1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SL

Only recently have we seen the market for the Mercedes-Benz 190SL and certain R107 SLs trend upward, but for as long as I can remember, the W113 SL, otherwise known as the “Pagoda” has been the hands down favorite of collectors. I’d almost consider it the air-cooled 911 of the Mercedes set, given where values have been hovering for the last couple of years. This 1971 280SL for sale in Texas represents the last year for the Pagoda. This one was restored by noted specialist Bud’s Benz in Georgia in an uncommon Seafoam Green.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SL on eBay

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Year: 1971
Model: 280SL
Engine: 2.8 liter inline-6
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 46,994 mi
Price: Reserve auction

Texas Classic Cars of Dallas is proud to present this beautiful classic Mercedes-Benz 280SL Convertible. This particular car has been treated to an extensive restoration by Bud’s Benz in Douglasville, Georgia. Today, it is displayed in our Dallas, Texas showroom. Just over 400 miles have been logged on this frame-off restoration. Enjoy our presentation and feel free to contact Dave at 214-213-7072 or Maris at 214-616-2317 with any questions.

Mercedes’ W113 chassis coupe/roadster body made its debut at the 1963 Geneva Motor Show. This nimble sports’ luxury chassis was used through 1971, the final year.

This example was treated to a beautiful restoration. The original green finish was upgraded to vintage Mercedes Pearl Green (Seafoam Green). This unique color was offered on the legendary 190SL Convertibles. It was the perfect color choice to restore this car in. We have several photos from Bud’s Benz of the car in the restoration process, as shown above. This Mercedes looks amazing in person and gets tons of compliments from Mercedes’ enthusiasts that have visited our showroom in the few days its been on display here at Texas Classic Cars of Dallas. The car was disassembled with all paint and interior restoration completed in 2009 by Bud’s Benz. It has been garage-kept since and is in excellent condition both cosmetically and mechanically.

The 280SL model was introduced in 1967 and in production until 1971. These cars boast a host of improvements over earlier examples, the main one being a much improved powerplant in the 2.8 litre 6 cylinder engine, rated at 170 horsepower, while the U.S. version was more emissions friendly, rated at 160 horsepower. The engine runs very smooth and is paired with the factory automatic transmission, crisp shifting. This is a very fun & easy classic car to drive.

Many of these attractive Convertibles were sold in the coupe/roadster configuration, fitted with this quality-made removable hardtop. This hardtop was restored along with the car.

The paint and body condition on this Mercedes-Benz are in excellent condition. The special Mercedes Pearl Green paint was chosen especially for this example. The closer you look, the better this car gets. The color-keyed wheels were restored in Pearl Green and fitted with new Coker Classic Whitewall Radial tires (195/75R14s x 4). The chromed bumpers are U.S. spec with the bumper guards. The glass was removed during the restoration and new seals installed throughout. The convertible soft top is also in excellent condition, replaced during the restoration. This is a beautiful Mercedes, very well restored by the experts at Buds Benz in Douglasville, Georgia. These guys really know what they are doing with classic Mercedes-Benz roadsters. We are impressed with this car. Open the doors to 1971. The interior is in beautiful condition, very well done and showing as original.

The upholstery is fully restored, as is the padded leather dash. The instrument of choice are the original VDO gauges, functional and in excellent condition. The radio is the original optional Becker Eurona II AM/FM pushbutton stereo. You have to appreciate this nostalgic period-correct Mercedes-Benz interior. The upholstery is in excellent condition throughout as is the carpeting and bright work.

The engine compartment is in excellent condition, you can see the level of time and expertise put into this car. The 2.8 liter 6-cylinder engine is factory rated at 170 horsepower. The gearbox is the 4-speed automatic. This car is a pleasure to drive down the road. The doors in excellent condition as are the door panels. The doors were removed during the restoration work. The original trim identification plate, vin plate and production plates are all intact.

Underneath the car is the original flooring throughout. This underbody is in excellent condition, always a dry climate car and is shows. The trunk is very clean and detailed, showcasing the original pan along with the rubber mat, spare tire & wheel, with lug wrench & jack. Enjoy our lengthy photo slideshow below, there are many additional photos. Again, feel free to contact Dave at 214-213-7072 or Maris at 214-616-2317 with any questions. This is your opportunity to own a collector quality 1971 Mercedes-Benz 280SL Roadster with Hardtop. View our 100% positive customer feedback and bid with 100% confidence.

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If I was going to go to the trouble of restoring a W113 SL, there would be a few things I’d do differently. I like the color on this one, but I probably would have used a lighter parchment or black interior color for better contrast. Also, like the 600 SWB we featured yesterday, I’d skip the whitewalls. I’d like it if this 280SL were a 4 or 5-speed manual, but the automatic isn’t a total deal breaker. To finish the package off, however, I would throw a set of Euro market headlamps on it to give the front a cleaner look. Over ten years of Mercedes-Benz ownership, I’m familiar with Bud’s Benz and can say, hands down, that they run a fine business for parts and service with a knowledgeable staff. Given the work that’s gone into this particular SL, I’d expect it to reach somewhere in the upper end of the range. Somewhere in the $90,000 to $120,000 range at the current time would probably be a reasonable estimate.

-Paul

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4 Comments

  1. I agree about the lighter interior needed to offset better. The color of the top looks nice. Also, a manual is what I would want in a car like this. It looks like the underneath could still use some freshening. Fyi: there ask is $55,000.

  2. I drove one of these belonging to a friend’s mother when new, and they were not fast. The automatic started in second unless floored or manually shifted. At $10,000 CDN, it seemed stodgy compared to the Barracudas and Cutlases other were driving at the time. I’m sure I would appreciate it much more now. But not this one! I just can’t get past the colour of the body, and the interior doesn’t improve things. Those painted wheels and whitewalls are like the over the top icing on a cheap cake from Safeway. Why would you buy a Mercedes dressed up like a ’56 T-Bird?

  3. Conservativesdefeated

    I owned a ’67 230 SL Pagoda with hardtop back in the eighties when you could hardly find one on the street. A Euro import model with Euro headlights, kilo speedo in dark maroon.

    An absolutely beautiful car and even with the auto every time I drove it , the exhaust sound was intoxicating. The rumble of that six cylinder is the best. I was tboned by an inattentive hausfrau and predictably USAA salvage titles it and took it. The rust under the headlghts and fenders was too much in their estimaton at the time. I think i bought it for 11,000 in early 1980.

    The 280 here is beautiful but I as a potential buyer would want one in the livery from which it left the factory. The carefully worded descripton leads me to believe there has been a color change.

    And i would want a Gettrag 5 speed……

    All that said it is beautiful

  4. Should I end up with the family 1971 280SL 4-speed, it will undergo a color change from it’s current non-original medium green/black interior. I’m intrigued by this color, but think I like the metallic mint green a bit more.

    http://37.media.tumblr.com/29244c2e7d55bb08767691e7f8611231/tumblr_mlzh98qGQ81qkqupno1_1280.jpg

    But, I still think the flat grey/red interior combination might be the best on these.

    Great find!

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