1989 Mercedes-Benz 560SEC AMG Widebody

2017 marked the 50th anniversary of AMG that was celebrated through the year with various events and press pieces. As a result, lots of AMG cars young and old came out of the woodwork for sale. All of a sudden, a clapped out 1995 C36 with faded paint is a desirable car that people are fighting over. You take the good with the bad and today we have, I think, one of the good. It’s a desirable 1989 560SEC for sale just out of Leeds, England. What started life as your standard W126 coupe was transformed into a 6.0 AMG monster … I think.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Mercedes-Benz 560SEC at Motorhub UK

Year: 1989
Model: 560SEC
Engine: 5.5 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 16,767 mi
Price: £109,995 ($145,237)

 

******* FACTORY 560SEC AMG 6.0 HAMMER WIDEBODY LHD 1 OF 50 EVER PRODUCED WORLDWIDE *********** Left-hand drive, Metallic Black, Costing in excess of $200k when new, just 50 of a projected run of 100 cars are believed to have been completed pre-merger by the AMG factory. Utilising their own 385 bhp DOHC 6.0 version of MB’s big V8, along with suspension and interior upgrades and the stunning body modifications, AMG created what is, even today, regarded as one the most desirable and easily recognizable factory modified modern Mercedes. , High Spec Includes, Full Black Upgraded AMG Recaro Leather Interior, Wood Capping Including Door Cards, AMG Steering, Amg White Dials, Electric Seats, Heated Seats, Memory Seats, Climate Control, Air Conditioning, CD Player, Cruise Control, Electric Windows, Electric Mirrors, Central Locking, AMG Upgraded Suspension, AMG Sports Exhaust, Full Wide Body BY AMG Factory, AMG Split Rim Alloys, Fresh Imported From Japan From A collector, Japanese Service History, Recently Recommissioned, No Expense Spared,, Very Rare And Collectible Model,, £109,995

This car is a classic AMG Japan creation. This car left Germany as a regular 560SEC and at some point in its life was transformed into what you see today. That equals lots of AMG parts and even more wood. If you see a modified Mercedes from decades past and it has an extreme amount of wood in it, it is almost always from AMG Japan. Everything looks really great and is no doubt a really stunning car.  But, I see a problem under the hood. Everywhere in the sellers description and everywhere on this car it is labeled as a 6.0, but it is clearly stamped on the valve covers as a 5.6. Now, I can’t prove this isn’t a 6.0, but it is very easy to add a bunch of stickers and badges to a car while it is not so easy to add AMG valve covers. You can make the call.

Vintage AMG stuff is extremely hot right now so seeing this one listed for sale for over $145,000 doesn’t surprise me at all. Is it worth that? In my opinion, no way. I understand these cars are selling for big money, but it seems like a giant risk to me. Lots of these pre-merger cars have little to no documentation as to where they came from, who did the work and what exactly is in the car. I feel like these cars are bringing big money because they are rare, they look cool and there is some sort of speculation going on that values will just keep rising on them. While I agree on the first two points, I can’t say I see these ever being multiple six-figure cars. I look at it this way: A really nice regular 560SEC you can pick up for $20,000 and it will probably keep it’s value for a good while. So is this car, with a bunch of body work, interior treatment and what may or may not be a 6.0, worth another $120,000?

– Andrew

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3 Comments

  1. Love the seats and the wood!

  2. It’s a nice car other than the fact that it’s not a 6 liter nor a “Hammer.” As mentioned the engine stamping clearly states 5.6 and the general consensus is the name “Hammer” refers to the 4 door sedan with the 6 L DOHC engine. For some reason all pre merger AMG’s come with improper stickers and/or decals… not sure why people want to tart up their cars but whatever.
    The DOHC engine came in 5, 5.4, 5.6 and 6.0 sizes.
    I have pretty much the same car in 6L form and the engine stamp is XXX 6,0 28. Twenty Eight referring to the builder.
    Unless one has a unbroken chain of title or documentation the only way to determine the displacement is to measure the bore.
    The true beauty of the old AMG engines lies in their simplicity and use of mostly MB off-the-shelf parts. Mechanical parts availability is good; complete gasket sets are around $200 from Cometic, pistons are modified Porsche 928 and much better now than when new. Last time I checked a new crank from MB was around $300. Most of the bottom end is standard M117 MB. The timing chain is standard Regina, I believe the gears are MB’s. Beru makes the wires as does Magnacor (if you like red and are willing to spend $400. or so).
    The only “problem” is setting the valves. You’ll need the special tool ($400 or so) from Renntech as well as a dial indicator and about a full day to do it right as well as an assortment of shims. I’ll have to check but I think (guess is more accurate) that Alfa ones are what’s currently being used.
    Trim parts are available if one is patient. The rear 10″ Penta’s are difficult to find, the 9’s are somewhat easier. Correct tires are impossible as they are no longer being made in the proper size.
    In other words… a very useable, easily maintained classic, that was about 2.5 times the cost of a Testarossa when new and is much faster even today. And… you wont see yourself coming and going at every car show. Nor will you need to take out a second mortgage when it comes to parts.
    Kind Regards,
    Ron

  3. Yes i agree the Vendor/Agent needs to get their facts right and supported when advertising it is a 6 litre version when AMG have stamped it a 5.6litre (96.5mm bores versus enlarged bores to 100mm and appropriate 100mm pistons to create the 6 litre version which AMG charged a lot of cash for this extra work)
    The 5.6litre 32V AMG is still a rare masterpiece so just need to get the details correct.

    These pre-merger AMG versions were all hand built to spec and the only reason these over-engineered cars for their day are not much higher in value today as a collectors car is because they were never track raced to gain that status which takes a car from this era up to another level in today’s market.
    They are a timeless masterpiece of sophistication and cutting edge style for an 80’s road car coupe modified in limited custom order numbers by AMG that just happen to fly under the radar up until recent years when they have gained more attention.
    They are an extremely comfortable coupe to drive with very good road manners and vision all round that easily soak up the highways in grand style without the bone jarring cramped cabin ride of the likes of other makes like Porsche of this era.
    Considering the cost of these AMG modified Coupes when new, it is understandable they have climbed back up in price post GFC in 2010-13 when they hit rock bottom.

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