1984 Mercedes-Benz 300SD with 11,300 miles

File this one under another great Mercedes-Benz that you usually see with hundreds of thousands of miles on but for whatever reason has almost none. This 1984 300SD shows a crazy 11,300 miles and looks every bit the part. You can totally see why people plunked down almost $40,000 (over $93,000 in 2017 dollars) for these when they are new. It’s frugal, handsome, secure, has enough to power to get out of its own way and all this won’t cost you a fortune to keep going. Except this car, as you might have guessed, will need a small fortune to take home with you.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Mercedes-Benz 300SD on Mercedes Heritage

Year: 1984
Model: 300SD
Engine: 3.0 liter 5 cylinder
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 11,300 miles
Price: $35,000

Single owner SD through 2015.
Rare 904 Midnight Blue with Creme leather.
Spectacular preservation from new.
Spotless engine bay.
Full handbooks.
Runs and drives beautifully.

What is there to say about this car? I overwhelmingly prefer the gen 1 (1981-1985) W126s over the later ones even though they do look a little more dated, but I think that’s the beauty of them. Give me a clean set of 14 inch Bundts with a OM617 and I’m as satisfied as I can possibly be in owning a car. This is a great color combination with the Midnight Blue and tan interior even with those terrible North America spec headlights.

Like I said, all this is going to cost you. $35,000 is a ton of money for any W126 but it’s tough to fault the seller for asking it. The market for clean golden-era Mercedes diesels isn’t slowing down but I wouldn’t bet on this car gaining anymore value once you start driving it. As I’ve said before, miles don’t scare me one bit so I’m really not the guy that this car appeals to.…

Peter Gregg’s 1978 Porsche 930

This Porsche 930 has two very unique features about it and I suspect just how much people care about each will be pretty divergent. Ultimately, a sale likely will be predicated on that rare individual who prizes both unique features fairly highly. The first “feature” should be obvious from the title. This 930 is said to have originally belonged to Peter Gregg, former Porsche racing driver and founder of Brumos Racing. Brumos has had a long and distinguished history with Porsche and Gregg himself was a distinguished driver in the ’70s. For some these are merely fun facts that add little value to the car. For others, they are the kind of facts that change a car from something that looks pretty nice to something that’s special. A collector’s piece.

The second unique feature is of the more typical variety, but a very rare version: the interior of this 930 is leather-to-sample with Dr. Fuhrmann seats. Fuhrmann seats are extremely rare in a 930. They’re also really strange looking, but ultimately it is their rarity that will win the day here. Combined these two features make for one very special 930. At least if you care about these things.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 on eBay

Year: 1978
Model: 911 Turbo
Engine: 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: 25,965 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

This 930 Turbo is so rare! It was previously owned by Peter Gregg, the founder of Brumos Porsche. The car was awarded to Gregg after winning the 1978 24 Hours of Daytona, and acquired by Auto Palace in 2015 from a private collection. The exterior of the 930 Turbo is Grand Prix White the interior is a leather-to-sample, with the rare factory Dr. Fuhrmann Interior and Seat option. Extensive service records are present for the vehicle.

1990 BMW M5

From the “Cars that need no introduction” file, witness the M5. So ingrained into the halls of automotive Valhalla is the M5 that it seems as though there was never a time without one. Yet while there were fast sedans that predated the Motorsport 5-series, the reality is that this was the blueprint which all subsequent fast sedans (tried to) emulate.

If you look up “benchmark” in the dictionary, the M5 should appear as an alternate definition.

But enough of the hyperbole, hoopla and heady praise. You know the details of what makes this car great. So what makes this particular one special?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 BMW M5 on eBay

Feature Listing: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe Backdate

Among Porsche 911 enthusiasts and collectors the 1973 911 Carrera RS is a much adored car and for very good reason. While not the very first performance oriented model of the 911 Porsche produced, previous versions like the 911R were produced in such small numbers that most buyers never would have had any shot at them. While the Carrera RS was still produced in relatively small numbers, production still reached around 1,500 so there were a few to go around and they caused quite a stir.

Naturally, all of this greatness means prices are now very, very, high. Some Lightweights have eclipsed $1M. Because of those high prices and the general demand for the style and performance it has become increasingly common for builders to backdate later 911s, usually the 3.2 Carrera or (more rarely) the 964, bringing the style of the long-hood Carrera RS to the more modern mechanicals and underlying structure of a later 911. We’ve featured quite a few of these builds and they come in all sorts of spec and with a wide range of prices. Here we have another, which I think looks fantastic in its very understated, but still quite pretty, Dolphin Grey exterior and within the typical range in which we see these priced, this one seems pretty reasonable!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe Backdate at Kachel Motor Co.

Year: 1987
Model: 911 Carrera
Engine: 3.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 134,600+ mi
Price: $58,995

KMC is proud to present a unique opportunity to own this bespoke, award-winning, Restomod air-cooled 911. The build was based on a clean, numbers-matching 1987 911 Carrera from California. This was a perfect base for the build, given the well-established reliability of the 3.2L engine, with a slicker-shifting Getrag G50 gear box and revised chain tensioning and lubrication system (which plagued the previous 911 generations).

1986 Volkswagen Jetta GLI

Like its brethren GTI, in 1985 the Volkswagen Jetta GLI went a bit more upscale with the second generation of water-cooled performance. While the two shared most underpinnings between them, the Jetta was aimed at a slightly more upscale buyer. As a result, things like power windows, locks and mirrors and (gasp!) even an automatic transmission were available in the sedan but not the hatch. The GLI package, like the GTI, offered visual clues that greater performance lay under the hood; you got a red-striped exterior and alloy wheels outside. But unlike the GTI, VW omitted the blacked-out VW badges and the flashy “GLI” grill insert until later in the run. Inside, special velour sport seats, a multi-function display and standard power steering (it was optional in the rest of the range) with a leather-wrapped steering wheel helped to distinguish the model. But the meat of the meal was the added sport; the HT-code inline-4 was good for 100 horsepower and mated to a close-ratio 5-speed manual as standard. You also got disc brakes all around and an upgraded sport suspension with front and rear anti-sway bars. You could grab all of this fun for just a hair under $10,000 with no options – exactly $100 per a horsepower.

For 1986, power was up slightly to 102 with a new RD-code motor, again shared with the GTI. That massive power increase was met with a corresponding increase in base price to $10,190. Yet most reviews of the period felt that even at that price, the Jetta represented a great value; a perfect mix of sport and practicality with reasonably good build quality. The GLI of the period never sold quite as well as the GTI or caught on in quite the same way, though, so it’s a special treat to come across a clean and mostly original ’86 like this one:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Volkswagen Jetta GLI on eBay

1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Because I primarily write about Porsche 911s I tend to feature a lot of cars with very low mileage. As enthusiasts this understandably frustrates us and many readers. Machines are made to be used, especially such highly capable machines as the 911. The more rare the model the more likely we are to find one with few miles as owners tuck them away preserving them for years in pristine condition. Just look at the 911 Speedster.

I don’t mind seeing these cars; it’s always great to pore over the details of a like-new car that’s more than 30 years old as a way to experience something that I was too young to experience first hand at its inception. Still, cars that have been driven have stories. They have brought joy to their owners, sometimes mixed with frustration, but ultimately they have enlivened the senses and been utilized as their engineers intended. That in itself is interesting and worthwhile.

There are a lot of ways for a car to be rare, and sometimes higher mileage can itself be a rarity. Here we have something pretty rare: an Arctic Silver Metallic 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S, located in Los Angeles, with 67,044 miles on it. Granted, even this Turbo S is technically quite low in miles if we think about how many miles per year this figure represents. These things are relative. Nonetheless, this is quite a few more miles than just about every other Turbo S I’ve seen and, as the seller notes, that means you could (should!) actually drive the darn thing. Imagine that!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S on eBay

1992 Audi V8 quattro

While visually most people would have a hard time telling a 1991 and 1992 V8 quattro apart, there were a bunch of little changes throughout the model if you were paying attention. The easiest change to spot was the BBS RG forged wheels that carried over from the 1991 model. At 15 x 7.5″ with a 35mm offset, they filled out the widened arches nicely. The more pragmatic change was in badging; after two years of no model designation (one with nearly identical looking but very different cars underneath for sale), the company finally decided other people besides the owner should know what they were driving. V8 badges were added to the grill and left rear of the trunk, and a “quattro” badge returned to the right side of the lid. Much less noticeable was a more pronounced exhaust, with twin stainless outlets now emerging straight out instead of the 1990/1 down-turned tips.

Inside there were few changes; minor gauge movement had occurred between 1990 and 1992. Connolly leather seats were now standard (as were nearly all items on the V8), and the wood trim was upgraded. The V8 came standard with the Cold Weather package, sunroof, ABS, and BOSE radio. Gone was the option to row-your-own, as the manual was removed from the U.S. market. However, a light revision to the shift points along with an integral cooler meant that the 4-speed automatic in the ’92-94 models was more robust.

But the big change was under the hood, where a new ABH 4.2 liter all-aluminum V8 met the owner. With 276 horsepower and 295 lb.ft of torque, it was the most powerful Audi you could buy in 1992, and acceleration matched the manual and turbocharged S4. All of this luxury and speed cost; the sticker price was now up to $54,000.…

1995 BMW M3 GT

While you’re no doubt familiar with the great lament of the de-tuned E36 M3 and the inflated price of the very limited Lightweight model, Europe enjoyed a full spectrum of Motorsport performance. One of the potent additions to the lineup was that of the M3 GT. Intended to homologate racing bits and aerodynamic tweaks for the E36, 350 limited BF99 examples were produced in early 1995. The motor was turned up to 295 horsepower with hotter cams, special oil pumps and Motorsport oil pan and revised computer controls. They also had stiffened and lowered suspension, a strut brace and a 3.23 final drive. Outside new spoilers front and rear increased downforce, and like the Lightweight the GT wore the M forged double spoke staggered wheels. Harder to spot were the aluminum doors the car wore to help keep weight down. All were painted 312 British Racing Green and featured Mexico Green Nappa leather interior with Alcantara bolsters, special Motorsports badging and carbon fiber trim.

They’re a very special and rarely seen variant of the E36 M3, and increasingly in this collector market that means a higher asking price:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 BMW M3 GT on eBay

1968 Porsche 912 Coupe

I do miss the days when I could come across a Porsche 912 and feel confident its selling price would be reasonable. We seem to have long passed those days as price tags above $50K are very common with some even approaching $100K. Those examples are few and far between, but, of course, it never stops other sellers from attaching similar figures to their cars hoping to capitalize on a few big sales.

In theory, this 912 should be pretty reasonable. It isn’t original or numbers matching. Bidding even is quite reasonable and we could hope that with some time that bidding would be taken into account and the asking price will come down. For that we must wait. Either way, here we have a very pretty 1968 Porsche 912 with a Polo Red exterior over a Tan interior and a reported 58,628 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 912 Coupe on eBay

Year: 1968
Model: 912
Engine: 1.6 liter flat-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 58,628 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

1968 Porsche 912

Karmann bodied 912 with appreciating value
One of only 7,458 912 models sold in the United States in 1968
Polo Red exterior with tan interior
1586cc flat four-cylinder engine from a ’66 Porsche
Dual DeLorto carburators
Five-speed manual transmission period correct for 1968
Koni Shocks, with Weltmiester Adjustable Spring Plates
Nardi steering wheel with engraved signature and Bird’s Eye Maple dash trim insert
VDO gauges, Hella lights and dual Durant sideview mirrors
Optional 15-inch chrome wheels
Documentation includes original owner’s manual and some service records
MotoeXotica Classic Cars is proud to offer this 1968 Porsche 912 for your examination. This is a Porsche you can take out and drive, either as an everyday commuter or on weekend club runs. This 912 is a California car and currently on a California title from San Diego.

Roll the dice? 1992 Mercedes-Benz 500E

Bet big to win big, right? Today might be one of those situations. What we are looking at is a 1992 Mercedes-Benz 500E with a hair under 50,000 miles. This is obviously very good in the big picture. But the real pictures you are seeing show a different story. This monster W124 is so dirty you can’t tell the condition of the paint, the tires are nearly flat and the seller has no real information on the car other than it’s just been sitting in the driveway for at least a year.

Ready to gamble?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Mercedes-Benz 500E on eBay

Year: 1992
Model: 500E
Engine: 5.0 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 49,396 mi
Price: No Reserve Auction

Low mileage because owner collected many cars.

Grille is 1993 version. Has been sitting in driveway at least 12 mos, battery may need to be replaced. Tires appear low. Can probably be driven after battery is charged. But current registration is for planned nonoperation. This is not an estate sale.

Interior of car is very new looking.

Previous license was 3CLH104 prior to a rear-end accident where license plate was lost.

The 500E is a dilemma if I’ve ever seen one. These are no doubt valuable cars and the current market isn’t slowing down on them. Any E500E that is in any kind of decent shape is usually bringing $12,000 right off the bat even for cars pushing the 200,000 mile mark. Once you start getting into lower mileage cars that are very well sorted you can hit $30,000 very easily and head all the way up to $150,000 for Jerry Seinfeld’s 500E.

A couple of things about this car I find interesting. First is that it has been updated to the 1994 facelift look.…