All posts in Motorsport Mondays

Motorsport Mondays: 1974 Porsche 911S driven by Paul Newman

There’s been a number of celebrities over the years who have tried to make the jump into motorsports, sometimes successfully, sometimes not. The actor Steve McQueen, often associated with the embodiment of cool, tried his hand at British Touring Car racing and won his class in a stint at the 12 Hours of Sebring, sharing the driving duties with Peter Revson and winning his class. More recently, the actor Patrick Dempsey has competed in the 24 Hours of Le Mans and the Rolex 24 Hours at Daytona. One of the most memorable actors to get involved into the sport of racing was Paul Newman.

Newman’s role in the 1969 film Winning sparked his interest in racing and was the start of a lifelong obsession, both as a driver, team owner and winning Daytona at age 70. No doubt about it, any car associated with Newman is bound to grab the collector’s attention. This 1974 911S for sale in Georgia was raced by the actor in Sebring in 1977 and went on to campaign successfully for many years later.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Porsche 911S on eBay

Continue reading this article

Motorsport Mondays: 1967 BMW 2000CS

While BMW was a well-known name throughout Germany in the 1960s thanks to their prolific motorcycle history and pre-War exploits in the Mille Miglia and other sports car races with the 328, outside of Germany they remained fairly unknown in the 1960s. Indeed, in the late 1950s or early 1960s, if you asked someone to identify where the kidney grills belonged in Britain, they’d probably point you towards the BMW-derived Bristols of the day – straight copies of some of the first post-war BMWs, right down to the grill. So in the 1960s and 1970s, BMW went racing to try to spread the reputation of their engineering out of motorcycles or perhaps some veiled World War airplane references with their “New Class” sedans. It was independent tuners like Schnitzer and Alpina that first really started to get the small sedans noticed in Touring classes. While the large coupe based upon the New Class design wasn’t raced much in its day – efforts instead focusing on the smaller, lighter and similarly powered sedans – it’s none-the-less exciting to see a 2000CS that has been modified in the style of the period racers:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 BMW 2000CS on eBay

Continue reading this article

Motorsport Mondays: 1986 BMW 325 NASA Spec

Most of us who are car enthusiasts have a desire at some point or another to go racing. Ever since watching my uncle work the Sports Car Club of America ITE circuit with this ’88 Corvette, I was hooked. The constraints of urban living make having a dedicated race machine a bit impossible, but one can dream. This 1986 BMW 325 built to National Auto Sport Association specifications seems like a good place to start satisfying the urge for those who have track day visions.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 BMW 325 NASA Spec on eBay

Continue reading this article

Motorsport Mondays: 1985 Volkswagen GTi 2.0 16V

There’s a saying that goes something along the lines of “To make a small fortune in racing, you have to start with a large one”. While it’s true that any track-related activities are generally a one-way flow of cash – out – from your bank account, it doesn’t necessarily mean that you need to be a millionaire to go have a lot of fun. One of the more affordable platforms that budget weekend racers took to in the early 1980s was the then-new Volkswagen GTi; with solid aftermarket support, a light and nimble chassis and and crash it, walk away ability, the inexpensive Volkswagen was a natural track candidate. It’s become rare to see either of the first two generations showing up at the track these days, no surprise as many are 30 years old at this point. But once in a while, one that has undergone development and is a tidy package pops up, and today’s 1985 GTi is just one such example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Volkswagen GTi on eBay

Continue reading this article

Motorsport Mondays: 1990 Porsche 944S2 Firehawk

In a recent discussion regarding why values of the E30 M3 had taken off while the Porsche 924/944/968 had remained affordable, one of the comments suggested that the reason was because the Porsches did not enjoy the race pedigree than the M3 did. While one can’t deny the success of the E30 M3 on track and even in rally venues, that answer belies the many races and different series that the 924 and 944 competed in. Indeed, the development of the 944 and 944 Turbo motors came about in part because specifically of the race programs. In everything from local SCCA races straight up to the big dogs at Le Mans, the Porsches were racing right beside some of their more famous 911, 935, 936, 956 and 962 brethren. On top of that, the factory also fronted 924 Carrera GTS cars in the World Rally Championship, many of those that were involved later to move to Audi’s program. Then there were the one-make 944 and 944 Turbo Cup races around the world. But into the late 1980s and early 1990s, one of the hottest contested, affordable race series in the U.S. was the “Firehawk” series put on by IMSA and the SCCA. One of the more competitive cars in those race series were the late 944S2 and 968 models, offering serious reliability, surprising speed and excellent balance to make a fantastic race car. One of the original 944S2 Firehawk cars is up for sale today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 944S2 Firehawk on eBay

Continue reading this article

Related Posts with Thumbnails