Motorsports Monday: Mecum Racing Porsches Roundup

Motorsports Monday: Mecum Racing Porsches Roundup

As Rob mentioned in his Jade Green Targa piece the other day, we’re entering in quickly to auction season. Mecum, typically the purveyors of more muscle cars than European rides, nonetheless had quite an impressive lineup of signification Porsche race models that cover a few decades and many changes in the company’s history, so I thought it would be pretty neat to take a look at them. It’s very interesting to see over a relatively short period of time the many changes that Porsche’s motorsports programs have gone through.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 934.5/935 at Mecum Auctions

Tuner Tuesday: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo Andial 3.8

Tuner Tuesday: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo Andial 3.8

Outside of our usual perusing of eBay we all have a variety of other sites we frequent when looking for interesting cars to feature. Some of the sites are sellers whose inventory is a constant array of amazing options and truthfully we could probably just run down the entire inventory and feature everything. But that’s not really what we try to do. That said, at times certain cars stand out so much that we can’t just pass by them. As I hope anyone reading this will agree, this is one of those cars: a paint-to-sample Blood Orange 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo that early in its life was shipped off to Andial for their 3.8 liter twin-plug conversion. On the engine side, the Andial conversion raises horsepower to 575 on 93 octane gas and 625 on race fuel. But it isn’t just an engine. Upgraded suspension and braking helps control the extra power and a sport clutch and single-mass flywheel help deliver that power to all four wheels. While perhaps not as all out and well known as a RUF conversion, the Andial conversions are special in their own right and on the 993 Turbo a rare treat to see.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo Andial 3.8 on RPM Sports Cars

Motorsports Monday: 1987 Porsche 962C

Motorsports Monday: 1987 Porsche 962C

When pondering this Porsche 962, I couldn’t help but try to analyze why I romanticize about the Group C era so much. For the best part of a decade, if you wanted to win in Group C, there was really only one car to drive – the Porsche 956/962. Sure, there were inter-team and extra-team battles between full factory and privateer efforts, but let’s just say that the diversity at the end of the race was not particularly staggering. Then there was attrition; both with cars and drivers, as this seriously dangerous time period moving heavily into aerodynamics revealed the fragility of not only the engineering, but the humans that attempted to control it. Yet, combining some great liveries, a swoopy, low-slung body, some gold BBS magnesium wheels (or better yet, the BBS Turbofans!) is still the most iconic period in endurance racing in my mind. This is somewhat ironic, since with the WEC today we’re witnessing what is arguably the best racing the series has ever seen with the fastest endurance cars ever produced; often in the 1980s, it was who made it to the end without breaking, crashing or running out of gas. But today, it’s an all-out 6-24 hour sprint as Porsche, Audi and Toyota take three different ethos of building and designing a “hybrid” car and bring them to fans attention. Spectacular? You sure bet it is, and there’s no guarantee of who will win. Yet, when my eyes flash across a 962, I get a flutter in my heart that I just don’t feel looking at the new generation of cars:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 962C on eBay

Motorsports Monday: Porsche 911 GT3 Cup v. Cayman S

Motorsports Monday: Porsche 911 GT3 Cup v. Cayman S

For German car fans who love racing, it doesn’t get much more exciting than Porsche’s long history of endurance racing. Indeed, Porsche’s venerable 911 seems intrinsically linked with racing – undoubtedly, part of its mystique. However, true factory racing Porsches have always been pretty expensive when new and still are so. Watching yesterday’s coverage of the 24 Hours of Daytona had me cringing as the multi-hundred thousand dollar Le Mans class 991 Porsches took each other out, attacked Opossums and exploded crankcases. It wasn’t a great day for Porsche at a track where the company has had an impressive string of successes. So, today I decided to take a look at two racing Porsches as an homage to their first rate engineering, their enduring appeal and incredible performance:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2014 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S Andial 3.8 – REVISIT

Tuner Tuesday: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S Andial 3.8 – REVISIT

Speculation is a wonderful and horrible thing. We speculate all of the time about how much cars are worth; partially we’re helped by a fair amount of experience in writing similar cars up, but at the end of the day cars are only worth what the market will support. And, in the case of today’s quite rare Andial-motored 993 Carrera 2S, I correctly postulated that the market wasn’t ready to support a $228,500 asking price. Unsurprisingly the car is back up for sale four months later – and perhaps equally unsurprisingly at the same asking price. There’s no doubt that this is a special car but it’s fairly far ahead of the market right now. It’s lovely, though – so at least we can enjoy some 993 eye candy to close out the year!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S Andial 3.8 on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site September 16, 2014:

Tuner Tuesday: 1979 Porsche 930 Andial/Ruf

Tuner Tuesday: 1979 Porsche 930 Andial/Ruf

For all of the crazy tuner modified cars of the 1980s, there were very few that came out the other side looking better than what the factory produced. However, I think two tuners consistently managed to outperform what came directly from the manufacturer. Alpina is one; the subtle spoilers, large but somehow fitting stripes and perfect wheels always make those models modified by the exclusive tuner really stand out. The second for me is Ruf; it’s simply amazing what just a set of Ruf Speedline wheels can do. It is literally as if the 930 shape was made specifically to match those wheels – not the other way around. You can add in the other Ruf bits, ducts and pieces and really make a masterpiece; but the wheels almost make the car special all by themselves. Of course, if you happen to have a bunch of other period-awesome modifications from top companies, that doesn’t hurt either:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 930 Andial/Ruf on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1985 Porsche 930 Andial 3.5 – REVISIT

Tuner Tuesday: 1985 Porsche 930 Andial 3.5 – REVISIT

The wild Guards Red 1985 Andial-modified Porsche 930 3.5 turbo is back up for sale, this time with a $5,000 lowered “Buy It Now” to one penny short of $85,000. That price is still pretty steep for a older heavily modified example, but this is a pretty neat and rare bit of Porsche Motorsports history. What would you pay?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Porsche 930 Andial 3.5 on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site August 12, 2014:

Tuner Tuesday: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S Andial 3.8

Tuner Tuesday: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S Andial 3.8

The 993 is, without a doubt, one of the more desirable 911s in the range of cars that span several generations. Enthusiasts agree, having quickly pushed prices up on these models over prior generations like the Carrera 3.2 and 964. In fact, it doesn’t ever seem like prices on these cars came down much – as soon as the 996 arrived, faithful flocked towards the older models, snapping them up. Especially sought are the Carrera 4S and Turbo models – but there are some really rare gems hidden that pop up from time to time. Obviously, the ultra-rare Turbo S, Carrera RS and GT2 models are a great example – quite rare indeed. I’ve also previously written up an even more rare Andial Twin-Plug Twin-Turbo, one of the reported 19 assembled by the noted factory approved race tuner. Today’s car, like that car, mixes some of the styles of the rare cars that we didn’t get or didn’t see many of. The base is the already semi-rare Carrera 2S; like the 4S, the body shell was shared with the Turbo, but unlike the all-wheel drive variant, the Turbo’s upgraded brakes didn’t carry over. To solve that, the owner of this car turned to Andial – with a host of exterior upgrades to make it look like a Turbo S and a host of RS-spec 3.8 upgrades to make it go well, this is one tidy package – and exceedingly rare:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S Andial 3.8 on eBay