1990 Mercedes-Benz 300GE Cabriolet

It has been awhile since I’ve featured a Mercedes-Benz G-Wagen Cabriolet because frankly, they don’t come up for sale all that often. People that know what they are usually want them pretty badly and when they get their hands on one, they keep it for a while. The last one I checked out was a 1999 G500 Cabriolet that was nearly perfect and came with a price tag to match at $150,000. Today’s G, a 1990 300GE for sale in Las Vegas,  is still a W463 but obviously a little older. This one however is a little cheaper and thanks to a bunch of custom touches, even a little bit cooler in my eyes. Although I want to be clear here. The word ”cheaper” is a relative term when talking about these trucks. They are still really expensive in the grand scheme of things. How expensive?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Mercedes-Benz 300GE Cabriolet on eBay

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BiChance: 1991 Alpina B10 BiTurbo

Here we are a week after looking at the 1990 Alpina B10 BiTurbo, and by chance, we get to look at a second BiTurbo. Last week’s was seriously suspect; there were alarm bells throughout, as major chassis issues and incongruous details were capped by a seller clearly looking to deceive the market. At first glance, there’s some cause for concern here, too, as we’ll see in a moment. Is this the case of another crestfallen hero, or does this super sedan hold true to its heritage?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Alpina B10 BiTurbo on eBay

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1976 Mercedes-Benz 450SL

One of my favorite configurations of cars is ‘business on the outside, party on the inside’. A reverse mullet of sorts. What I mean is, a car that has a standard appearance on the exterior, usually a subdued color, but a totally bright and wild interior. Usually you can just peak inside the windows to see something happening in there and it is all the more interesting once you finally get a full look inside. Today’s car, a 1976 Mercedes-Benz 450SL up for sale in California, is exactly that.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Mercedes-Benz 450SL on eBay

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Tuner Tuesday: 1985 Porsche 930 Slantnose

Have you been looking for the most ’80s Porsche you can find? Not just an ’80s model, but one that has taken the extra steps to modify it and add those little details that really showcase the time period? We’ve got just the car for you. Here we have a Black 1985 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe. The Slantnose itself always has been right at home in the ’80s exhibiting the general sense of excess in design with which we’re all familiar from those days. We dealt with the issue of authenticating the Slantnose conversion in our feature of this Slantnose and the issue presents itself again here as well. As the seller notes it isn’t until the ’87MY that these determinations become much easier.

The details don’t stop there though. This is more than just a Slantnose and especially once we step into the interior things really get interesting. The history of how this 930 came to be in its current state are a little fuzzy, but it’s had a good bit of work and houses some nice RUF upgrades. Let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Porsche 930 Slantnose on eBay

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1990 Volkswagen Corrado G60

If you’re into the small, sporty coupe, the other alternative to the 924s I’ve written up if don’t have the big bucks to buy a super clean 944 is Volkswagen’s answer – the Corrado. While that may generate a chuckle from some, if you breakdown the numbers, the Corrado was pretty close to the recipe of the outgoing 924S. Adding the G-Lader supercharger to the 1.8 liter inline-4 gave the Volkswagen similar punch; 158 horsepower and 165 lb.ft of torque with about 2,700 lbs to motivate. It was a 2+2 hatch as well, with more practical seating in the rear and plenty of storage space. The 195-50-15 tires gave plenty of bite, making the Corrado the equal of the 924S through corners, too. And early on it was even a bit cheaper than the 924S had been because, you know, it wasn’t a Porsche. It’d cost about $20,000 out the door; expensive compared to the GTI, but then this car was really intended to compete in a more upscale market.

Like the 924S, there are foibles. There’s a more potent version that’s quite a bit more popular in the later VR6, though it should be noted that just like the 944, by the time the SLC VR6 models bowed out of the marketplace they were 50% more expensive than the 1990 launch version. It can also eat up a lot of money in repairs, especially if the supercharger that made the package get up and go has got up and went. Also like the 924S, asking prices are usually out of line with market value, and there are quite a bit more abused ones out there than clean examples. I last looked at a clean, but at least partially (and poorly) resprayed example in November:

1990 Volkswagen Corrado G60

The asking price was originally $5,200, but it eventually sold for just under $5,000. That puts it squarely in line with the price of those two 924s from last week. Today, we get to look at another Tornado Red with dark gray/red stripe velour manual. While it has more miles on it, it looks clean and importantly is a no reserve auction:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Volkswagen Corrado G60 on eBay

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1993 Porsche 968 Club Sport

I believe this is a first for me. While I’ve written about the 968 previously, I’m fairly certain it’s never been the Club Sport. They’re rare so that’s not too surprising, but still given how often I’m on the lookout for early-90s Porsches you’d think at some point it’d have happened.

Like most any Porsche Club Sport model, the 968CS was a lightened and more potent version of the standard 968. While the 968 never was the most popular of Porsches they remain a lovely design even today and the Club Sport itself a highly sought after model. It was one of the favorite cars of our former editor, Paul. He featured them as frequently as was possible given their rare nature and the fact that they couldn’t be imported into the US. With it now being 25 years since they were first produced that problem should be more easily surmountable. If these were one of the cars of your dreams, then here’s your shot at one of these rare machines:

A Speed Yellow 1993 Porsche 968 Club Sport, currently residing in Canada, with 47,224 miles on it. This 968CS originally was delivered in Japan. There’s no word in the ad on when it made its way to North America, but it is said to come with extensive records so hopefully prospective buyers can work out those details.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Porsche 968 Club Sport on eBay

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2003 Mercedes-Benz S600

Last week I checked out the lowly 2006 Mercedes-Benz S350 that in addition to being literally short, was short on options too. Today, we travel to the other end of the (non-AMG) W220 spectrum with a car that has no problem with features or power, the S600. The thing about the W220 S600 is that despite only being produced from 2001 to 2006, this super sedan had two variants of V12s. The early S600s used the naturally aspirated 5.8 liter M137 that was so disastrous that it only lasted two years before the engineers went back to the drawing board to totally redesign a new V12 for their flagship cars. What they came with was a twin-turbo 5.5 liter M275 that proved to be much less troublesome. Luckily today’s car, a 2003 S600 for sale outside of Chicago, sports the M275. Even better, it checks in with just a little over 27,000 miles.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2003 Mercedes-Benz S600 on eBay

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Double Take: 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS – Black or White?

This will be a study of complete contrasts. Light and dark. Two examples of the 997 GT3 RS that look equally stunning, but achieve that through entirely different means. One is paint to sample, the other a standard color. Both are somewhat rarely seen in this form, though in the case of the white RS it is more the lack of adornment that produces that rarity.

I had seen this paint-to-sample Black GT3 RS previously and knew I would want to take a closer look. Then I forgot about it. When I came back around to it a Carrara White GT3 RS had also come up for sale. White and Black: neither color is much outside the norm for most cars, but the GT3 RS is not like most cars. Black even was a paint-to-sample option, which almost beggars belief. Let’s take a look at that peculiarly rare black example first:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: PTS Black 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS on eBay

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2016 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Rennsport Reunion Edition

For reasons I can’t quite put my finger on I’m quite attracted to Porsche’s Rennsport Reunion 911. While not really in the sort of colors I tend to prefer there is something great about the overall package and when I see one I definitely take notice. The Rennsport Reunion Edition served to commemorate the fifth Rennsport Reunion held at Laguna Seca Raceway in September 2015. It is a showcase of Porsche racecars from throughout its history.

We are sometimes hard on Porsche for its constant commemorative and special edition 911s. In most cases they just seem like another way to move some cars and in truth that’s probably the primary intent. But I will say this, in more recent years these special editions have been produced in very limited numbers. If you’re going to make something special, then you might as well go all out. The Rennsport Reunion Edition 911 is no different: only 25 were made. If you want one opportunities can be fleeting.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Rennsport Reunion Edition on eBay

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1988 Porsche 944 ‘Celebration’ Special Edition

In my recent double Porsche 924 post, the rhetorical and problematic question posing entry-level Porsches arose – ‘why not just get a 944’?

It’s a very valid question. Indeed, why would you choose a 924 – even a very nice, limited production one – over a 944? The answer is simple. Price.

When the 924S Special Edition was last on the market in 1988, you could stroll down to your dealer and pick one up for around $23,000. If you wanted to step up to the 944 – which offered no practical improvement in performance, mind you, as it was actually slower than the 924S – you’d have to shell out an additional $10,000. In many ways, that gulf of value perception remains today; it’s possible to find deals on 944s, but equal 944s to the two 924s I looked at? They don’t come cheap, at least not in asking price.

Yet while I’ve spent considerable time talking about the 924S Special Edition and what a cool package it offered you on the cheap, we never really look at its 944 equivalent. Often referred to as the ‘Celebration Edition’, just like the 911 and 924S the 944 received a Special Edition package in 1988. Built to commemorate the 250,000th 911 produced but coinciding with 100,000 944s made, too, Porsche officially referred to the 944’s trim as the “Special Edition Package”. What did you get?

For $2,437, Porsche equipped your car with option code M757. This gave the car “a unique leatherette/gray-plaid cloth interior, silver velour carpeting, and a commemorative plaque which may be personalized with the owner’s name” according to Porsche. You also had to select metallic paint, a $645 charge, in one of two colors; Satin Black Metallic or Zermatt Silver Metallic. Otherwise these cars were pretty well loaded; the antithesis of the lightweight, stripped-down 924S SE. They came with split-folding rear seats, electric sunroof, rear window wiper, and 15″ ‘Phone Dial’ wheels, along with standard fog lights, central locking, electric mirrors, power windows, power steering, and automatic climate control. Like pretty much every special edition Porsche, these cars were seemingly earmarked for collectors:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944 Special Edition on eBay

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