Peter Gregg’s 1978 Porsche 930

This Porsche 930 has two very unique features about it and I suspect just how much people care about each will be pretty divergent. Ultimately, a sale likely will be predicated on that rare individual who prizes both unique features fairly highly. The first “feature” should be obvious from the title. This 930 is said to have originally belonged to Peter Gregg, former Porsche racing driver and founder of Brumos Racing. Brumos has had a long and distinguished history with Porsche and Gregg himself was a distinguished driver in the ’70s. For some these are merely fun facts that add little value to the car. For others, they are the kind of facts that change a car from something that looks pretty nice to something that’s special. A collector’s piece.

The second unique feature is of the more typical variety, but a very rare version: the interior of this 930 is leather-to-sample with Dr. Fuhrmann seats. Fuhrmann seats are extremely rare in a 930. They’re also really strange looking, but ultimately it is their rarity that will win the day here. Combined these two features make for one very special 930. At least if you care about these things.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 on eBay

Year: 1978
Model: 911 Turbo
Engine: 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: 25,965 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

This 930 Turbo is so rare! It was previously owned by Peter Gregg, the founder of Brumos Porsche. The car was awarded to Gregg after winning the 1978 24 Hours of Daytona, and acquired by Auto Palace in 2015 from a private collection. The exterior of the 930 Turbo is Grand Prix White the interior is a leather-to-sample, with the rare factory Dr. Fuhrmann Interior and Seat option. Extensive service records are present for the vehicle. For further information, call 614-347-3257.

While always important, documentation will be paramount with this 930 both to validate claims of Gregg’s ownership and also the originality of the interior of the car. We’ll also want to know something about its history and the level of originality this 930 possesses. A quick search of the VIN turns up a little bit of information, but nothing too definitive. It appears the interior is substantially original, but the exterior likely was repainted. That’ll bring the value down a little, but shouldn’t be too harmful.

I am pretty interested in how this 930 gets valued. Famous owners can attract extra dollars, though not always and sometimes their fame has to be much more broad than someone like Peter Gregg who won’t be known by many outside of racing circles. A very low mileage and totally original ’78 930 can bring in pretty high values, easily exceeding $150K, and that doesn’t even get to the unique features of this particular 930. So we could be looking at something pretty special. Bidding, however, remains very much on the low end for such a car, reaching only $60,100 as of writing. We’ll see how everything changes, but right now I can’t imagine this will be going anywhere any time soon.

-Rob

5 thoughts on “Peter Gregg’s 1978 Porsche 930

  1. I think you’re right about this car’s special value. It’s worth what It’s worth because of what it is, not for who might have owned it. I went to college with Peter and we were motorcycle riding buddies. At an IMSA race at Riverside in the 1980s, when Peter was a multi-year champion, I asked him about ex-Peter Gregg cars. He explained to me an interesting relationship with Porsche, which led to a new factory Porsche every year. The point was, as he said, “there are a lot ex-Peter Gregg cars.”
    FWIW

  2. The Ask on the Auto Palace website is $149,9.

    Pretty car. I don’t follow the 930 market, but I will watch this one.

  3. You’d think they’d at least have a COA. They offer no documentation of Gregg’s ownership. My memory fails me a bit, but were 930s legally imported in MY 1978?

  4. Jack a: ’79 was the last year of important. That year Porsche did something interesting. They issued a run called The Last 50. I think one went to each dealer. Speculators were crazy for the car. As they sat in dealerships the above-list price climbed. I think the value became $50,00 a car. That’s a great price now but it wasn’t then. Some of the far-sighted noticed that Porsche was still producing the car. So there was no “Last 50”. The bubble burst in 82 or 83 when US importation resumed. Regardless, 1979 Porsche Turbo Carreras command a premium.

  5. I remember seeing a 930 that was touted as being one of Gregg’s at the now defunct Steering Wheel in Fort Lauderdale back in the 80s I believe. Anyway it had an unusual interior, too. There was a material that resembled burlap on the door panels and other interior pieces. There were some other unique features that I don’t recall at the moment.

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