1968 Mercedes-Benz 600

A few days ago I was talking with a friend who owns and operates a Mercedes-Benz restoration shop and the topic of the W100 600 came up. It was mostly me asking all kind of questions as to what it is like to own one of these cars and getting answers that blew my mind. One thing stuck out that about stopped me in my tracks. He told me that a 600 he services for a doctor had to choose between doing some repairs on his car or putting a new roof on his house. It was at that moment I realized I was never going to own a 600 nor want to own a 600. Our conversation then turned to the cost-per-mile calculation to own one of these and he threw out the number of roughly $5. Most exotics usually average about $3.50 a mile. That means if you own a 600 and drive it a conservative 2,000 miles a year, you can expect your wallet to be $10,000 lighter. To think, some people still don’t understand that this just isn’t another old Mercedes that has some pricey parts on it. I’ve said this before and I want to say it again, there is no faking owning a 600. The amount of time and money needed to keep one of these probably surpasses some short-lived marriages.

Anytime a 600 pops up for sale, I always hurry to take a look because of the crazy options that could be lurking inside as well as the possibility of it being owned by a celebrity and/or murderous dictator. Today’s 600, a 1968 up for sale in Chicago, probably didn’t have any executions called in from the rear seat because it wasn’t owned by someone of that ilk and this car is equipped with a rear refrigerator, not a telephone. This 600 was actually first ordered and owned by a man named Don Ricardo. Ricardo was a NBC Orchestra conductor but real passion was cars — especially Mercedes-Benz. Ricardo owned two 300SL Gullwings, a 1928 SSK and one of the most infamous Mercedes of all-time, a 1935 roadster custom-built for Nazi Gestapo chief Heinrich Himmler. I assume this car was a 770. Anyway, safe to say that Ricardo liked his cars and knew exactly what he was buying in this 600. From there, details on this W100 are slim but thanks to the power of the internet, I was able to uncover a little more about this Grosse.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Mercedes-Benz 600 on eBay

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Bahama Yellow 1968 Porsche 912 Coupe

I don’t know what my most commonly featured 912 color is, but if you told me it was Bahama Yellow I wouldn’t be surprised. It’s an absolutely wonderful color that possesses tons of character, but it isn’t so bright you have to worry about blinding your friends and neighbors. So let’s look at another one: this one-owner (sort of) 1968 Porsche 912 Coupe, located in California, with a reported 51,545 miles on it. It’s said to be matching numbers and with a full history since new. The paint isn’t original, but the 20+ year-old respray still looks quite good. Just a lovely car!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Bahama Yellow 1968 Porsche 912 on eBay

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1968 BMW 1600

BMW’s long road to recovery in the postwar era was interesting to say the least. Before the war, BMW had a moderately successful series of luxury and sports cars with its 326, 327 and 328 lineup. However, the market for those cars in Germany didn’t exist in the early 1950s and the technology was quite dated, so BMW found itself reliant upon an Italian-designed and licensed bubble car — the Isetta — to sustain early sales. Of course, with their motorcycle expertise, the air-cooled twins that found their way into Isettas were reliable (though not sprightly) units.

Though economical, a family sedan the Isetta did not make, so starting in 1957 BMW stretched the two seats into four and created the 600. With just shy of 600cc from an enlarged rear-mounted engine borrowed from a R67 motorcycle and a four-speed manual gearbox driving a new semi-independent trailing arm rear end, the 600 was a serious step forward for the company. The improvements were masked behind a familiar face (which still served as the primary door, as with the Isetta) and the 600 was not a sales success, with just shy of 35,000 produced. Intended to compete with the Beetle, it offered little respite from Volkswagen’s steamrolling sales success.

1959 BMW 600

To remedy this, BMW continued to develop the 600 chassis into the larger and more conventional 700 model. Launched in 1959 as BMW skirted attempts by Daimler-Benz to purchase the Munich-based firm, the 700 heralded BMW’s first true postwar sedan. Yet in spite of the conventional sedan proportions, the 700 retained the motorcycle-based air-cooled flat-twin in the back, driving the rear wheels. Back when BMW’s naming conventions matched their engine sizes, the eponymous sedan’s power was upgraded to nearly 700cc and 30 horsepower — 50 percent more than the 600. Styling came from Italian Giovanni Michelotti, who would go on to pen the next generation of BMW sedans.

1959 BMW 700

The 700 was available in three configurations — the conventional sedan, a sporty-rooflined coupe, and a convertible, each sporting era-correct tail fins. True to the company’s history, BMW even raced the 700 in rally, circuit and hill-climb events. The 700 would go on to be a relative sales boom for the company, bridging the gap between the borrowed Isetta models and the company’s first postwar conventional sedan: the water-cooled, front-engine Neue Klasse you probably remember best in the form of the legendary 2002.

1962 BMW 1500

The Neue Klasse launched with quite a splash in 1961 at the Internationale Automobil-Ausstellung in Frankfurt, and signaled a new direction for the company. Badged the 1500 due to its 1499cc M10 water-cooled inline-4, the 1500 was later joined by larger displacement models, some with fuel injection; the 1800 in 1963 and the 2000 in 1966. In 1964, the 1500 was replaced by the enlarged 1600. The M10 was punched out to 1573cc and now produced 4 more horsepower for a total of 84. While the 1600 wasn’t the first Neue Klasse, it was the first commercially successful model; between the beginning of 1966 and the end of 1968, BMW produced nearly 70,000 units of this model alone. This particular 1600 is a 1600-2 (the 1602 badge didn’t appear until 1973) from late in the ’68 VIN run, one of the 17,702 produced in this batch:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 BMW 1600 on eBay

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1968 Porsche 912 Vintage Rally Car

Here’s something pretty cool: a fully restored former Swedish rally 1968 Porsche 912 wearing its original color scheme and (what looks to be) a replication of its original decals and equipment. We see these sorts of Porsches pop up now and then, but in most cases they aren’t actual former rally cars, but rather builds that owners have put together that were inspired by the Porsche rally cars of the past. To have a chance at the real thing is a pretty nice treat! And the asking price really doesn’t seem too bad either.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 912 Vintage Rally Car on eBay

Year: 1968
Model: 912
Engine: 1.6 liter flat-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 250 mi
Price: $89,900 Buy It Now

Available today is a very unique and rare 1968 Porsche 912 rally car. This is a genuine period competition car that raced as a new Porsche from 1968 in rally events held in Sweden. This is NOT a replica or made up car. VIN # is 12801307. Mileage is approx. 250 since being restored about 5 years ago. Great looking car in it’s original color combination of polo red exterior with black leatherette interior.

Car has a replacement blank case. Engine was likely installed when the restoration was done but exact date is not known. Please note that this is a US street legal car and is currently registered in Georgia. There is no US title included. Car is sold on bill of sale and Georgia registration.

It was imported to the U.S. from Sweden then completely restored to as rallied configuration by the experts at Klub Sport Racing in Florida. This rally car has lots of period rally images and rock solid documentation as well as period magazines with the car featured. A lot of effort was put into the details such as the Halda rally equipment, German studded snow tires, rally lighting, skid plate, European heating system and lights, and perfectly duplicated period livery as well as lots of little details that give the car a great and unique presence.

The quality of the restoration is excellent with a very straight properly painted body, re-anodized window frames, detailed and rebuilt mechanicals and suspension, great interior with blacked out dash (as rallied in period), and houndstooth seat inserts. The car runs and operates beautifully. This great old Porsche rally car can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of a similar competition 911 and for much less than the owner has invested in the car.

Includes pictured chrome wheels along with a set of wheels with studded snow tires. A very unique opportunity to own a very cool vintage Porsche.

In Summary:
– A beautifully restored vintage Swedish Rally 912
– Great documentation and period photos
– Very unique – you won’t see one of these at the next Porsche gathering

– Car has very low mileage since being restored. Drives and presents very well.

Vehicle Condition:
I have not personally inspected this vehicle. I am relying on the pictures and descriptions provided by the seller. I can tell based on pictures and conversations with the owner that this 912 is very well restored with tons of money spent.

Please feel free to ask questions prior to bidding. I will make sure to get every questions answered in a timely basis.

I invite and encourage any interested party to inspect this car in Atlanta, GA.

There are all kinds of inherent difficulties to assessing a car such as this. In this case those difficulties are exacerbated for US buyers – given that the car now resides in the US – by the fact that much of the documentation is in Swedish. But at least we have some documentation, along with some articles from when it was racing, and any resourceful individual can find a translator if you’re in serious pursuit of this 912.

All of this makes for a very interesting Porsche. While it seems somewhat clear that the exterior has been restored to its original spec I’m not sure whether that also applies to the interior. A conversation with the restorer should shed some light on how they went about the project. Even if the interior is more period-correct than original it still looks in nice shape and purpose built. Given that some excellent 912s have begun to sell for prices not far from this asking price – with at least one even selling for higher than this price – that makes this one seem pretty reasonable. It certainly will stand well apart from every other 912 and should serve as a fantastic head turner and conversation starter.

-Rob

1968 Porsche 912 Coupe

I do miss the days when I could come across a Porsche 912 and feel confident its selling price would be reasonable. We seem to have long passed those days as price tags above $50K are very common with some even approaching $100K. Those examples are few and far between, but, of course, it never stops other sellers from attaching similar figures to their cars hoping to capitalize on a few big sales.

In theory, this 912 should be pretty reasonable. It isn’t original or numbers matching. Bidding even is quite reasonable and we could hope that with some time that bidding would be taken into account and the asking price will come down. For that we must wait. Either way, here we have a very pretty 1968 Porsche 912 with a Polo Red exterior over a Tan interior and a reported 58,628 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 912 Coupe on eBay

Year: 1968
Model: 912
Engine: 1.6 liter flat-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 58,628 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

1968 Porsche 912

Karmann bodied 912 with appreciating value
One of only 7,458 912 models sold in the United States in 1968
Polo Red exterior with tan interior
1586cc flat four-cylinder engine from a ’66 Porsche
Dual DeLorto carburators
Five-speed manual transmission period correct for 1968
Koni Shocks, with Weltmiester Adjustable Spring Plates
Nardi steering wheel with engraved signature and Bird’s Eye Maple dash trim insert
VDO gauges, Hella lights and dual Durant sideview mirrors
Optional 15-inch chrome wheels
Documentation includes original owner’s manual and some service records
MotoeXotica Classic Cars is proud to offer this 1968 Porsche 912 for your examination. This is a Porsche you can take out and drive, either as an everyday commuter or on weekend club runs. This 912 is a California car and currently on a California title from San Diego.

Originally delivered to Porsche Cars Northeast in Bedford, Massachusetts on December 18, 1967. This 912 is finished Polo Red with a tan interior. Both the engine and transmission have been changed, with the transmission slightly newer, but still correct for the year. The engine is from a 1966 vehicle but appears to have been rebuilt as it runs extremely well.

Structurally and mechanically the vehicle is very sound, with many newer parts – Koni shock absorbers, Weltmeister adjustable spring plates and bushings, brake lines, rebuilt calipers, brake rotors, master cylinder, shift couplers, transmission linkage, tie-rods, DeLorto carburetors and a 050 Bosch distributor.

The car’s paint and trim are in overall good order, presenting as a nice driver quality 912. The windows are clear, intact and haze-free. The car’s Hella lights are in similar very good order, intact and crack-free. The car rolls on good-looking Michelin radials, 195/65R15, surrounding the original and optional, 15-inch chrome wheels that sparkle. Its spare tire is in place and looks to be in good order and the front and rear bumpers are in great shape, too.

Inside, the tan interior is in overall very good shape, from the reupholstered front bucket seats, to the matching carpet and headliner. Facing the driver is a Nardi wood steering wheel with engraved signature and the instrument panel has a Bird’s Eye Maple trim insert to complement its VDO gauges. The inner door panels and shift lever, topped by a complementing wooden knob, are in very good order. A whimsical touch, the car’s seat belts are red, echoing the exterior. Completing the interior is a Clarion AM/FM stereo with CD player.

The Porsche 912 was manufactured between 1965 and 1969 as its entry-level model. The 912 is a nimble-handling compact performance four-seat vehicle, capable of up to 30 miles per gallon fuel. This is possible because of a high-efficiency engine, low weight, and low drag. A variant of the Type 911, one of the most famous and successful sports cars of all time, the Type 912 initially outsold the 911, boosting the manufacturer’s total production until success of the six-cylinder 911 was assured. As production of the 356 model concluded on April 5, 1965, Porsche officially began production of the 912 coupe. Overall, Porsche produced nearly 30,000 912 coupes. This is one of 7,458 912s sold in the United States in 1968.

In 1968, the United States Department of Transportation (D.O.T.) imposed mandates that would significantly change the Porsche 912. No longer permitted were glass lenses that had enclosed the headlights, and in their place were large chrome bezels that housed the lenses directly. Windshields were made of composite glass for increased strength. Instead of silver, windshield wipers were painted matte black to reduce unwanted reflections. And to increase wanted reflections, Durant side mirrors were enlarged considerably. Door buttons were more recessed. For U.S. cars, colored reflectors were also fitted to the sides of the car. Inside the car, the 1968-only the rear-view mirror was attached to a spring-loaded release attachment located on metal window frame, between the sun visors instead of the chrome plated metal type bolted to the roof of the car. Easier to read white lettering replaced the green Porsche had historically used on all its gauges. All interior fittings, from window cranks to ashtray pull, were now encased in soft rubber plastic, which was deemed to be less damaging to occupants in the unfortunate instance of a collision. In addition to safety concerns, the U.S. D.O.T. also imposed environmental regulations for 1968, which Porsche was able to comply with by introducing a vacuum advance 050 Bosch distributor, split-shaft Solex carburetors and an air pump that pushed more air through the tail pipe thus lowering emissions but only as assessed expressed in terms of parts per million, and not overall.

For 1968, 912 door panels were a unique one-year only design and doorframes in were now aluminum instead of chrome-plated brass. For added stability, wheel width was increased from 4.5 to five inches. For more reliable braking, a dual circuit master cylinder was introduced. A larger 420-watt generator charged the battery faster.

Looking for a German sports car you can drive regularly versus one with a “look but don’t touch” vibe and that will still appreciate in value? Then visit MotoeXotica Classic Cars to check out this late 60s Porsche 912 before someone else takes it home.

This car is currently located at our facility in St. Louis, Missouri. Current mileage on the odometer shows 58,628 miles. It is sold as is, where is, on a clean and clear, exempt mileage California title. GET OUT AND DRIVE!!!

VIN: 12802427
EIN: 747006

The big points we need to take into account with this 912 is that neither its engine nor its transmission are original to the car. The engine is an earlier unit from 1966. The seller says it appears to have been rebuilt, but it’s clear that this seller did not install the engine and may not know much about who did and when. The transmission is said to be period correct and slightly newer. Again, there’s little information. A PPI should tell us if each unit is in proper working condition and well maintained. Obviously, being non-numbers matching is not ideal, but if your goal were to get a driveable 912 for lower cost, then this would less of an issue.

The interior, which looks quite nice though obviously refurbished, also has some non-original additions. These would be my biggest quibble, though I will admit the wood additions fit the general character of the car. I just think the wood is all wrong. Why not attempt to replicate the look of the wood dash in a ’65 or ’66 911? Those are beautiful and possess wonderful vintage character. This wood looks too modern. Some may enjoy it though for that extra dash of modern luxury.

As I said above, this 912 should come in at a reasonable cost due to all of these issues. And it is a really nice looking example both inside and out. Bidding is following suit sitting at only $17,300. That in itself would be a very attractive price if everything is in good mechanical condition. Alas, the seller’s asking price is a good bit higher. Something will have to give and we’ll have to see if bidding eventually comes up to the seller’s ask. I don’t expect it to so with patience a buyer may still get a pretty nice price in the end.

-Rob

1968 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa

I shall now return to my favorite quirky Porsche model with this 1968 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa, located in California, with a reported 60,082 miles on it. I suppose to be totally accurate the 911 Soft-window would be my favorite, but the 912 is close enough. While it might be a strange looking design there’s a ton of versatility to these Targas as the removable rear window allows for a variety of open-cockpit driving conditions. If you want a fully open experience you can remove the roof and unzip the rear window. Or perhaps it’s a hot sunny day and you just want some extra airflow? Then leave the roof in place, but keep the rear window down. And, of course, the standard Targa configuration with which we’re very familiar: remove the roof and keep the rear window in place.

The Soft-window Targa was intended to allow Porsche to continue to provide their customers with as open a cockpit as possible, while meeting what they expected would be increasingly stringent safety requirements that would necessitate the fixed roll hoop. Those requirements never materialized, yet it did take Porsche another 15 years before a 911 Cabriolet would come into existence. That leaves us with the Targa and these interesting pieces of engineering as Porsche first developed a model for the 911 and 912.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 912 Soft-window Targa on eBay

Year: 1968
Model: 912 Soft-window Targa
Engine: 1.6 liter flat-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 60,082 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

1968 Original Soft Window Targa
new black paint with charcoal German carpet and black leather seats and interior by Auto International of Escondido
5 Speed
rebuilt engine / Big Bore / # 752983
rebuilt carbs
new rubber, seals, and bushings,heater hoses
no rust
original floor pans
original rubber floor mats
Fuch alloy wheels
jack and lug wrench
removable hard top excellent original
New soft window and tonneau boot and bag by Autos International of Escondido

appointment available
Del Mar, CA

The SWT we see here we wouldn’t really consider a special version of the breed, but rather a pretty standard example in a standard black on black color combination. The condition looks pretty good, but we must admit that the pictures don’t tell us a whole lot, especially with regard to the interior. We do know that a certain degree of restoration has been undertaken as this SWT has new paint and interior along with a rebuilt engine. The engine raises a quick question as it’s said to be “big bore” so we’ll want to see documentation of the engine work so as to fully understand its current state. Documentation verifying the mileage, assuming it exists, also would be a huge help.

Unsurprisingly, these questions currently seem to be suppressing bidding – or perhaps an optimistic bidder will view it as a chance at better value – the auction sits at only $35,100 with reserve unmet. The 912 in general can show pretty significant value differences between excellent examples and more run-of-the-mill examples with the SWT always tending to drift a little higher within those scales given its relative rarity. So we’ll have to see where this one ends up, but right now the price remains low.

-Rob

1968 Porsche 911 Soft-window Targa Sportomatic

This might be the quirkiest 911 I could feature. And I don’t mean that in a derogatory way, but rather in the way it utilizes a number of early and short-lived technologies and combines them all in one package. Here we have a Tangerine 1968 Porsche 911 Soft-window Targa, located in California, with 59,589 miles on it. Rather than the standard 5-speed manual transmission it is equipped with Porsche’s 4-speed Sportomatic transmission, the first year the marque would offer their attempt at producing something like the clutchless manually-shiftable automatic transmissions so prevalent today. In that regard, while the Sportomatic eventually disappeared, and rarely was favored while it existed, it did serve as a prelude to what was to come. The Soft-window Targa is a different story: around for only a few years and quickly replaced with the hard window version with which we are all familiar. The ability to open the rear window while keeping the top in place provided extra versatility, but it became clear pretty quickly that most owners weren’t much interested in that versatility.

I have never come across a 911 that combined these two interesting pieces of Porsche engineering and I don’t suspect we will find many of them that do.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 911 Soft-window Targa Sportomatic on eBay

Year: 1968
Model: 911 Targa
Engine: 2.0 liter flat-6
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 59,589 mi
Price: $129,000 Buy It Now

Up for sale, 1968 Porsche 911 Soft Window Targa sportomatic with matching numbers in its most desirable color tangerine.
The car has been restored and the restoration is documented.
New paint job, engine rebuilt, interior has been partially restored trying to keep the most original and unrestored parts like the 2 front seats.
Staright body, perfect new floor pans, The original 5-1/2” x 15” Fuchs have been polished and painted.
Rare 911 Soft window targa sportomatic, really low production and highly collectible.
Don’t miss the oportunity to own a piece of the Porsche History.

Comes with original books, service records, tool kit, jack and spare tires.

more information upon request.

Adding to the intrigue here, 1968 was the final year before Porsche extended the wheelbase of the 911 to provide it with better balance and cope with its rear-weight distribution. Naturally, that means ’68 was the only year a Sportomatic could be had on a short-wheelbase 911. And to further elevate our interest all of these quirks are covered in a wonderful Tangerine paint. The Targa robs us of a little of the Tangerine joy since the top is black, but this 911 looks great none the less.

So this is a very unique 911. It’s been partially restored (the interior is said to be mostly original) and looks in good shape, but we aren’t provided with anything in the way of documentation to verify the claims of originality nor any information on its history and provenance. Those will be key factors in determining whether this asking price is reachable. It’s priced at the very top of the market and beyond where we’ve typically seen any Sportomatic sell. I do wonder if all of these unique attributes will help elevate the car in the eyes of some collectors though. For someone interested in having a piece of Porsche engineering history this 911 makes for a nice option and certainly is one you could spend a lot of time looking over and talking about.

-Rob

1968 Porsche 911L Coupe

A long-hood 911 up for a no-reserve auction almost always manages to attract my curiosity. I know there will be problems – either basic cosmetic and mechanical problems or problems with originality (or all of the above!) – but why let that deter me? In the case of the 911 here my interest is increased by it being the one-year-only L, not necessarily because the L was a particularly special model, but simply because we don’t see them often and that makes them more interesting. Prices for the L typically hover between those of the T and E and I’ll be curious where bidding takes this one. Let’s start with what we have and then get to the issues below: A Coffee Brown 1968 Porsche 911L Coupe with what looks like a cream-colored interior and a reported 133K miles on it. I suppose we could say that these two colors were destined to go together.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 911L Coupe on eBay

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1968 Porsche 912 Soft-Window Targa

Here we have one of Porsche’s more interesting design ideas: the Soft-Window Targa. Most are quite familiar with its hard windowed cousin, which has been available on the 911 for most of its life. But far fewer may be familiar with the precursor to the 911 Targa. With the Soft-Window Targa Porsche sought an engineering solution that would allow for maximum openness in the cockpit while retaining a measure of structural integrity they thought would be necessary to meet impending safety regulations. Those safety regulations never became manifest, but their design did. It’s somewhat simple: use a fixed roll-hoop and make the top and window removable. The look is somewhat strange and the window section was quickly converted to a fixed window, but the soft window provided a great deal of versatility and choice for drivers depending on just how much of the external environment they wanted to experience. The Soft-Window Targa is quite rare on both the 911 and 912 and as such will command higher values, with the 911S being far and away the most expensive. The one we see here is from the earlier short-wheelbase model years as well: an Irish Green 1968 Porsche 912 Soft-Window Targa, located in California, with 113,000 miles on it. It should be noted, this 912 does not possess its original engine, but the rest of the car is said to be original.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 912 Soft-Window Targa on eBay

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Double Take: Tangerine 911S – Coupe or Targa?

Time for some citrus. I’ve mentioned previously how the market for the long-hood 911 has plateaued, and perhaps even reached its peaked, but even if that is the case the 911S remains a special car that we must keep an eye on. These were some of Porsche’s first opportunities to show its ability to produce a top-level machine that could provide performance but also remain civilized. The 911S epitomized that focus and here we have two different variants, both of which come in the wonderful shade of Tangerine over Black. With values remaining mostly stable over the past year it’s not a bad time for those who really enjoy these early 911s to look for the right opportunity. Here we have both a Coupe and a Targa and both look in very good condition. Which would you choose? We will begin with the Targa, from the 1968 MY:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1968 Porsche 911S Targa on eBay

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