1976 Porsche 912E

With the air-cooled 911 market backing off a bit, especially for classic 911s of the late-70s and ’80s, the hope, or at least my hope, is that this will help return the 912 to its typical place as an inexpensive alternative. After all, if the 912 is commanding high dollars then it’s tough to rationalize one as a driver when a little effort almost surely could turn up a decent 911. One caveat is that the original long-hood 912 produced from 1965-1969 may remain a more expensive option. We haven’t seen the long-hood 911s come down in value much (though they aren’t really going up in value either) and I suspect the 912 will follow suit. That leaves us with the one-year-only 1976 Porsche 912E that we see here. Like the 911 of its era the 912E is most distinguished from its predecessor by its impact bumpers, but it also featured a larger 2.0 liter flat-4 replacing the 1.6 liter of the original 912. Unfortunately, that increased displacement did not bring with it additional power as the 912E actually offered fewer horses on tap than when equipped with the 1.6. It’s also heavier. This wasn’t an atypical problem for Porsches of the time as the mid-year 911 suffered a similar fate and these points help explain why they remain some of the lower priced options on the air-cooled market.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 912E on eBay

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Bat Signal: 1976 BMW 3.5CSL

While there are iconic liveries that permeate motorsports, sometimes there are equally iconic aerodynamic aids. The 1970s and 1980s saw some incredible experiments, from the Brabham BT46 ‘Fan Car’ which sucked all of the air out from underneath the chassis, literally sticking the car to the road to the 935/78 ‘Moby Dick’ car, which somewhere underneath the long tail and stretched front end was actually a 911 (in theory, at least!). For BMW, exploiting the Group 5 FIA rules to suit their E9 chassis and make it competitive with the Porsche 911. That meant the aerodynamics of the 3.0CS had to be altered, and the result was wings, fins, and flares. But if the road going version of the also lightened 3.0CSL looked outrageous, the racing version simply took the recipe and turned it up to 11. Giant boxed flares widened the E9 half again. A huge front air dam looked capable of clearing cattle on the Sante Fe railway. Huge centerlock BBS magnesium wheels sported a footprint that would make most large commercial planes jealous. And if the tires didn’t shock them, the huge cantilevered wing protruding from the back of the trunklid certainly would spoil their plans to go airborn. This was the legendary car which gained the name “Batmobile”, and though they were not ultimately able to defeat Porsche in the Group 5 contest for 1976 (you know that, of course, because of the many Martini Championship Edition Porsches we feature), they are no less memorable than the 935:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1975 BMW 3.5 CSL at Jan Luehn Cars

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1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera – REVISIT

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The Grand Prix White 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera we featured back in May is back up for sale this time with the price reduced by $10K. I don’t know if that reduction will be enough to see it sell, but with its sport seats and wider wheels this 930 has a few interesting options added to what is already a very nice car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site May 17, 2016:

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1976 Porsche 912E

An enduring myth in the car world is the old lady. You know, the car whose current owner – and ideally this is long-term ownership – is an older woman who has only used the car sparingly for shopping trips and other weekly tasks. These cars will be low mileage and have been very well maintained. Many times they are also well documented. The car will have seen almost no inclement weather during her ownership. To be clear, this is not myth in the since that such cars don’t exist – they most certainly do – and seeking them out can lead to some truly good bargains and fantastic cars. Why bring this up here? Because it’s exactly the case we have with this 1976 Porsche 912E located in Oregon. All of the basic typologies are present: 33 years of ownership, driven lightly on the weekends, excellent cosmetic condition, a huge stack of receipts. Perhaps even better? It’s a no reserve auction and bidding remains quite reasonable.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 912E on eBay

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1976 Porsche 911S Targa

I’m always a little wary of posting cars when the seller gets certain major pieces of information wrong – obviously a lot of issues are raised – but I think here barring that inaccuracy everything else with this 911 looks in good order and given that it’s a no reserve auction, buyers who put in the necessary legwork can know they have a legit shot at the car. The major error: the seller lists this as a 911SC, which it clearly is not based upon, well, everything. Here we have an Emerald Green Metallic 1976 Porsche 911S Targa, located in Oregon, with Cinnamon partial leather interior and 54,953 miles on it. This is a really nice color combination as the Emerald Green exterior – which reminds me of a toned down version of Viper Green – contrasts really well with the Cinnamon interior. And it is on these cars where I really enjoy the Targa. The roll hoop stands out really well and that little bit of openness allows the interior and exterior colors to show against one another to great effect. While I don’t expect it to remain there, with current bidding around $30K this 911S may even be had for pretty reasonable value.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911S Targa on eBay

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1976 Porsche 912E

I’m fairly certain that the very first Porsche 912 I featured here at GCFSB was one of the single-year 912E. In the three years since then, I’ve never featured it again. That is in part because the long-hood models are simply much better looking, but also they’ve tended to make more sense when their values are compared with those of their long-hood 911 brethren. Because mid-year 911s haven’t shown nearly the same high values the 912E doesn’t attract our notice quite as much. However, the long-hood 912 has begun to rise enough that they no longer seem like the wonderful values they once did. Perhaps the 912E can begin to make a little more sense. In that regard, I’m curious to have a look at where one might sell. We come across them pretty rarely, and frankly most of them are in pretty bad shape. But the one we see here, a Sepia Brown 1976 Porsche 912E with Tan interior, looks in pretty good shape. It needs work, as the seller readily admits, but the overall condition appears quite sound and perhaps the value it shows will begin to bring these into greater favor.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 912E on eBay

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1976 BMW 2002 eta swap

I’m not sure what it is, but lately I’ve fallen out of love a bit with most BMWs from the last 15 years or so. I think a lot of it is the continual business travel abroad that I do, always seeing and riding in interesting Italian, French and miscellaneous machines that we can’t buy new here in the US market. In my drive to be different, I usually buy my clothes outside of the US, but sadly, I can not do this with cars. What to do then? Create something yourself, such as this 1976 BMW 2002 with the 2.7 liter inline-6 eta engine swapped in for sale in California. It’s rather interesting that someone decided to swap in the longer stroke economy engine, as it’s not the usual go-to engine for a 2002 swap. But the overall package is quite pleasing.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 BMW 2002 eta swap on eBay

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1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

I’ve been waiting for this 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera to come back around and am happy it finally has. This 930 was listed at the same time (and by the same seller) as the Ice Green Metallic 930 I featured a month ago and I chose to feature that one since, well, it’s Ice Green Metallic and that’s such a wonderful color. But I’ve had this Grand Prix White example on my mind ever since. The condition is excellent and it looks to be well documented, but what really draws my attention are the specially ordered RSR 8- and 9-inch wheels. That extra width really helps fill in the wheel wells and gives this 930 some additional presence. Other than changing the headlights out for the much better looking H4 units this 930 also has retained its originality. There’s certainly a lot of positives surrounding this early Turbo, but whether it will reach this sort of price may be another matter.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

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1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

This is one of my favorite cars to come across: an Ice Green Metallic 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera. I realize that’s really specific, but the combination of the 3.0 liter 911 Turbo with this color really works for me and it always grabs my attention immediately. For my tastes this one is also helped by its Cinnamon interior, which has just enough darkness to it to provide the right contrast to that light green exterior. I even like the somewhat quirky and, in this application, subtle “Turbo” graphics that run the length of the car. I can’t really vouch for the seller’s claim that it is the single-most beautiful early Turbo to exist, but it would certainly rank highly.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

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1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0

One of the things I enjoy most about Porsches – beyond their brilliant mechanical abilities – is the possibilities available to buyers. Porsche is happy to provide its customers with just about any color combination or pattern, along with a host of options, through Porsche Exclusive. Granted, there typically is significant cost to those options, but as someone principally eyeing the second-hand market all of that variability keeps things interesting. One of my favorite options has been seat inserts. In some cases these are fairly standard solid colors that provide contrast with the rest of the interior. But Porsche has also offered other choices. My favorite is houndstooth, which we mostly see on early 911s, though it was revived most recently on the 50th Anniversary 911. That interior is spectacular. For those who desire something even more eye-catching, Porsche has also offered a variety of tartan seat inserts. If memory serves, I’ve only seen these on Porsches from the ’70s. They certainly won’t appeal to everyone and I’ll admit some of them don’t work, but in a few cases they look great and provide for an interior that has a lot more going on than the standard monochrome we typically see. The example we see here came with just such an interior: a Black 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0, located in Texas, with around 94,000 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 on eBay

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