1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

Last week I featured a Guards Red 1976 Porsche 930 that probably would have made for an interesting option if the price was right. Unfortunately, the current asking price is not right. Here we have another example, but this one appears to lack the flaws of that Guards Red 930 and as such it likely stands a much better chance of reaching its high asking price. When I came across this 930 I was immediately struck because I could swear I had seen it before, but couldn’t immediately place it. The pictures obviously have been heavily edited with regard to shading and lighting, but there’s a pretty good reason for that: the collection from which this 930 hails was featured in Excellence Magazine’s December 2015 issue and the pictures from that shoot used these same lighting changes. That was the aspect of these pictures that immediately recalled this 930 to mind and I am sure the seller hopes that buyers will recognize the car as being related to those in that article given the praise that was heaped upon the restoration work carried out on those early 930s. As far as I can tell this isn’t one of the three 930s featured in the Excellence article, or at least if it is one of them then the interior has been changed since those cars each had tartan fabric seat inserts. I’m not sure if those seat inserts were original, but I really hope they haven’t been removed because they looked fantastic and provided for a much more interesting interior.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

Continue reading

1976 Porsche 930

When I come across them I will almost always choose to feature a 1976 Porsche 930. They are one of the earliest examples of what has become an iconic model – the 911 Turbo – and their simplified and pared down nature relative to later examples brings with them a purity that many others fail to match. But they can be difficult, which the example here, a Guards Red 1976 Porsche 930 located in North Carolina, demonstrates quite well. As some of the earliest examples of the 911 Turbo these cars tend to be quite valuable, as we’d expect. But especially in the current market, where 911 prices have begun to retreat somewhat for all but the very best examples, there tends to be a disconnect between asking prices and where we’d actually expect a 930 to sell. We’ll get to the problematic parts, let’s start with the good. Generally speaking, inside and out this 930 looks very ncie. The Guards Red paint shows well and the interior looks crisp throughout. In addition, other than the steering wheel the interior appears to retain all of its original parts. I would guess the interior has been refreshed at some point during this 930’s life, though the seller makes no mention of that so perhaps it’s wholly original. All in all, for a 40-year-old Porsche with more than 100K miles on it the condition is good and while we’d likely classify it as driver-quality rather than concours it definitely has a lot going for it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 930 on eBay

Continue reading

1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Targa – No Reserve

I’ve shown a coupe examples of the Carrera 3.0 over the past months and given the fairly high price tags typically attached to these models, you can imagine my surprise when I came across this 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Targa on auction with no reserve. Suffice it to say a $100K price tag would not be surprising, though we must keep in mind that the Targa of these models always falls into a much different category. Even though the Targa is quite a bit more rare than the Coupe – Targa production in each of the model’s two years was around half that of the Coupe – it remains the less desirable of the two so prices should be lower. Where this one ends up, we’ll just have to see.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Targa on eBay

Continue reading

1976 Porsche 911 2.7 Sportomatic

While automatic manual transmissions have become extremely popular on modern cars, and especially in racing, their appeal was far more limited in early applications. Porsche, as they are wont to do, was an early pioneer in the development of such systems, debuting their Sportomatic transmission in 1968. Dubbed by Car and Driver as a “nifty answer to a question seemingly no one was asking,” the Sportomatic did away with the clutch pedal in favor of a torque converter, though it still required the driver to do the shifting. As an early prelude to today’s PDK, the Sportomatic seems more like an interesting engineering exercise more than anything else, but nonetheless 911s do still exist showcasing this quirky transmission. We don’t feature very many of these – in part because there aren’t many that come up for sale given their relative lack of popularity – but from time to time and interesting example comes up. While the Sportomatic was available up until 1980 we almost never come across one attached to the impact bumper 911s, which makes this one all the more interesting. Here we have a 1976 Porsche 911 Coupe with only 11,787 miles on it and that 4-speed Sportomatic transmission. The seller doesn’t tell us this 911’s original color, but during restoration it was repainted in Geyser Grey Metallic.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911 2.7 Sportomatic on Hexagon Classics

Continue reading

1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Coupe

The Carrera 3.0 remains, to me, a somewhat mysterious car. Never offered in the US, these 911s followed in the footsteps of the fabled Carrera RS as a lightened and more powerful variant of an already excellent machine. The US market retained only the standard 911S, which used a 2.7 liter flat-six that remained hampered by restrictive emissions equipment. Now these highly regarded 911 models can be found on our shores, though their relationship – even if somewhat fleeting – to the Carrera RS has made them quite desirable. We’ve featured a few in the past and it has been tough to get a sense of where the market exactly lies as asking prices and auction bids rarely seem to match up. But here we have another, a restored Oak Green Metallic 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 located in Belgium, that has seen plenty of miles during its life and currently shows around 112K miles.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Coupe on eBay

Continue reading

1976 Porsche 911S – Carrera RS Tribute

Modified Porsches, especially those which take aim at the look of an iconic model like the Carrera RS, are all about that first impression. While the details ultimately are what is important, we come across enough of these builds that it becomes easy to pass by many of them before those details even become apparent. Since you’re seeing it here, it should be clear that this one attracted enough attention to warrant a closer look. The details here are somewhat straightforward: this was originally a 1976 911S now fitted with the engine from a 3.2 Carrera mated to the 915 5-speed transmission. In typical fashion the exterior is completed with flares, a ducktail spoiler, and a set of Fuchs-style wheels all draped in Talbot Yellow with Black accents. The interior takes its cues from the Carrera RS with most amenities deleted and a set of Recaro seats that while not period-correct still look mighty good inside this 911. Mechanically it’d have been great if this were taken up a few notches, though that does tend to raise the asking price significantly. Perhaps this one may best serve as a canvas for additional performance upgrades should a new owner desire them. Strictly on appearance this one looks quite good.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911S – Carrera RS Tribute on eBay

Continue reading

1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Coupe

I’ve been trying to find a greater number of 911s that fall within the reasonable value spectrum – cars that perhaps more of us could aspire to own. This is not one of those cars, but I couldn’t pass it up. Here we have a restored Mint Green 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Coupe located in California. We should not let the ad’s mileage statement fool us: this has not been a garage queen. While it has not traveled much over the past twenty years – only 10K miles since the completion of its restoration – the first two decades of its life were lived quite fully as it traveled nearly 150K miles. Now it has been brought back to its former glory and looks in very good condition with little evidence of all those miles traveled. The Carrera 3.0 is a special model that we don’t see many of. Never available in the US they were an evolution of the Carrera 2.7 MFI, which itself was an evolution of the iconic 1973 911 Carrera RS, and they used a naturally aspirated version of the 3.0 liter flat-six found in the 930. These were a far cry from the 911s we had here in the US during those years, showcasing both more power and less weight. And, of course, their lineage makes them quite desirable.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Coupe on eBay

Continue reading

1976 Porsche 911S backdate

We’ve seen cars like this before. An impact-bumper Porsche 911 that has been backdated to the look of a long-hood 911, but all the while retaining its higher output engine. These 911s come in all sorts of builds, but I think this one stands out for two reasons. First, I find it incredibly striking. The Slate Grey paint looks wonderful and works well on the widened rear. It also works really well with the red accents that are eye-catching, but do not overpower the overall look, especially of the interior. The second factor in this car’s favor is that it lacks the typical six-figure price tag we see with many such builds. One of the most common criticisms of these cars is that the sellers simply are asking way too much money. Not only does this one not have a six-figure price, but the reserve on this auction has already been met so it looks like it will be going to a new home. It still isn’t cheap – bidding currently sits at $60,300 – but at least the market is having a chance to establish the value rather than an overly ambitious seller.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911S backdate on eBay

Continue reading

1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

It isn’t too often that I come across an old Porsche priced at $160K and think the price doesn’t seem too bad. As with any car of that sort the question of “why?” becomes paramount as we try to understand the reason for the seemingly reasonable price and whether the car truly is worth taking on the risk. Here we have a 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera where we find ourselves in just that quandary. Such is the world we are in with these early air-cooled Turbos. The issues with this one are in one part clear and in one part unclear. The clarity lies in the color: both the exterior and interior colors have been changed. The original colors were Copper Brown Metallic over Black and its current colors are Sahara Beige over Brown. Why the colors were changed is left unsaid and may be unknown as it seems those changes took place with a previous owner, rather than the current long-term owner of the car. It could be as simple as changing to a more desirable palette since brown metallic fell out of favor pretty quickly once we left the ’70s. Still, that’s our first piece of uncertainty. The rest of the uncertainty is more standard as the car recently has come out of long-term storage and that in itself can cause its own set of troubles. Its recent service records will help in that regard, but interested buyers still will want a thorough evaluation to be sure of this 930’s present condition.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on Excellence Magazine

Continue reading

1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 MFI Coupe

This is about as mid- to late-70s as a Porsche 911 gets. Bitter Chocolate over Tan with black trim and the Carrera script running down the sides. For a while now the mid-year 911s have been some of the least expensive classic 911s on the market, especially when compared to the long-hood examples that immediately preceded them. There have always been two exceptions to that rule: the Carrera 2.7 of the US market and the Carrera 2.7 MFI in the European market. It is that MFI Carrera that we see here and with prices for mid-year 911s slowly creeping up these models have set the bar for the heights these machines can reach. Mechanically similar to the ’73 Carrera RS Touring, the Carrera 2.7 MFI serves as an alternative for those who don’t have a spare million dollars lying around for a RS and the example we see here, a Bitter Chocolate 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 MFI Coupe located in Atlanta, comes from the final year these models were produced. These would be the last of the mechanically fuel injected road cars that Porsche would build.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 MFI Coupe on eBay

Continue reading