1977 Porsche 911S Targa

A couple days ago I featured a 911 that had undergone a bit of a transformation into what we might best describe as an off-roader. I thought it seemed like a potentially interesting project, but in its present condition seemed somewhat incomplete. The pricing also didn’t seem great all things considered.

Here we can look at something similar though nearly the opposite. This is a Burgundy Metallic 1977 Porsche 911S Targa and unlike the 911S Safari, as it was dubbed, this one appears in nearly original condition, was under long-term ownership, has very low mileage, and looks pristine. At its best, this is what a mid-year 911 can look like. As I noted in the Safari post, the general lack of desirability of these models makes them good candidates for unique projects. With this one maybe we’ll see just where the market presently lies for an original example.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 911S Targa on eBay

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1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

This one checks a lot of boxes. I won’t call it perfect and there’s certainly some questions, but the car itself as it presents here should prove quite desirable. Here we have a 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera. I’m not 100% sure on the exact color since we aren’t told what it is, but I think it’s Signal Green. That’s a great start in and of itself since I love these early Turbos and that’s a great color for any Porsche. The interior is a fairly standard black interior, though it is fitted with sport seats. If you’re looking for one of Porsche’s very unique tartan or pascha interiors from this period, then this one won’t fit that bill, but a standard black interior isn’t bad either and everything looks in good shape. I should point out that this 930 has been fully restored; we aren’t looking at an entirely original example, but that restoration looks to have been of high quality. So while this isn’t one of those rare as-it-left-the-factory examples it still shows as an example that will transport you back to the days of its original production. We can only hope it’ll drive as good as it looks.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

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1977 BMW 525

Update 4/14/18: After not selling last year for $7,300, this beautiful E12 is back up for $9,000 Buy It Now this Spring. Will Amazonitgrün Metallic be not only the sign of warmer temps, but also more money?

This probably seems strange at first, but to me this 1977 BMW 525 is the perfect counterpoint to yesterday’s Jetta. Like the Jetta, this Euro-specification 525 is on the low-end of the totem pole in the production scale of even the early E12 5-series. Granted, the introduction of the M30 into the E12 did up the power over the early E10 4-cylinder models; however, in 1977 this M30B25 produced 145 non-fuel injected horsepower – only 15 more than the 520i. The early 5s didn’t have much in terms of luxuries that we’ve come to associate with the benchmark sedan, either – they were fairly basic. But just like yesterday’s Jetta, this 525 located in Bulgaria is worth a long look because of the beautiful condition, which is enough to draw you back to a more simple time:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 BMW 525 on eBay

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1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

I have somewhat of an obsession with these cars. There’s obviously a certain degree of obsession that applies to all of us here at GCFSB – whether writers or readers – but I mean this specifically in reference to the 3.0-liter 930. I can’t even really say why that is. I’ve never driven one or sat in one; I’m not sure if I’ve ever even seen one, at least, not any time recently. By all indications from those much more familiar with them than me, the later 3.3-liter 930 is better. It’s more refined, more powerful, and just a generally all around better performer. There also are a lot more of them so prices are much lower for all but the final year model. Yet here I am: show me a ’76 or ’77 930 and I will stop in my tracks to go over the whole thing.

The only thing I can say for sure about this obsession is that I definitely think the earlier whale tail Turbos – rather than those with the tea tray – are better looking. Functional or not, I’ve never really liked the look of the tea tray spoiler, whereas I think the whale tail fits the 930’s lines just about perfectly. The tea tray makes the 930 look clunkier while the whale tail makes it look lighter, which of course it is! If you add the Turbo graphics available at the time, then I’m completely on board. Perhaps someone else will understand this obsession. I don’t know. Either way, here we have another one up for sale and it looks quite good: a Silver Metallic 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera, located in San Diego, with black interior and 40,035 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

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1977 Porsche 911S Coupe

It’s been a little while since we checked in on the market for the mid-year 911. Mostly that’s due to not frequently coming across particularly desirable examples. As one of the least loved of the air-cooled 911 range, and with performance and reliability concerns being largely responsible for that lack of love, these simply aren’t models that owners tucked away, using only for weekend cruising, or models that restorers have had their eye on returning to former glory.

This one is an exception. It has been fully restored and even though that restoration occurred seven years ago it still looks in wonderful condition. It’s also a nice color combination even if dark green metallics tend to attract less attention than other available colors. For those who are fans of dark green though – and I count myself in that group – I think this combination should have a good deal of appeal. The asking price strikes me as a bit high, but, again, I haven’t had a good eye on the market so a nice example could be capable of fetching this value. We shall see. Let’s take a look: here we have an Oak Green Metallic 1977 Porsche 911S Coupe with Cork interior.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 911S Coupe on eBay

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1977 Audi 100LS with 30,000 Miles

The Audi C1 may have introduced the United States to the concept of a large, luxurious…well, Volkswagen…but time hasn’t exactly been kind to its legacy. Every time one comes up for sale, immediately stories will emerge of how one caught on fire, or left someone stranded, or was difficult to maintain, or just plain broke and was left to die. From a generation where cars rarely reached 100,000 miles before their untimely death, the 100 was an interesting addition to the range of German cars available to the public, though not particularly memorable for anything innovative, unique, or superlative. Yet they signaled a new direction for Volkswagen’s range, and would go on to be an important part of establishing Audi’s foothold in the market.

The new B-range and C-range cars ostensibly replaced the NSU offerings like the 1967 TT, and Neckarsulm plant formed the backbone of the new production. Because of their visual similarity to the storied Mercedes-Benz W123, many often believe Audi just copied the Daimler design; however, when the W123 rolled out for production, the C1 was nearly done and due to be replaced with the C2 only two years later. Married with Porsche dealerships, the new Audi products sold remarkably well, especially considering their pricing. At nearly $8,000 in the mid-70s, you weren’t far off the established norm of American luxury cars like the Lincoln Continental. But this car didn’t have the features, or the ‘Murican V8, of those hulks. Still, Audi dealers managed to sell an impressive 146,583 before the new C2 5000 took over in the 1977-1978 model year.

Few of these 100LSs have survived the test of time, because for so long they’ve been considered an also-ran. For some time a friend of mine had arguably the nicest one in the United States, and he couldn’t sell it in the mid-single digits. Then last year something strange just a few weeks ago. His exact car sold at auction for $17,750. Has the world gone crazy? It’s no surprise that, immediately following that auction, here comes another pristine survivor 100LS:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Audi 100LS on eBay

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1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

I’ve featured a lot of 930s lately. More to the point: a lot of early 930s, especially the original 3.0-liter models. Before moving on to some other 911s I want to look at one more. This one didn’t make my roundup from the weekend because I mostly was searching for bright and unique colors for that post. This one is black so it wouldn’t have made the cut. But it’s quite unique in its own way so worthy of its own post.

While less unique black on black 911s and 930s have their own appeal and their own cadre of fans. For some buyers nothing other than black will do. When used as the color for a car like the 930 that exterior matches the persona of the car itself. Nothing here is to be trifled with. So the color may be common, but that doesn’t mean there’s little appeal.

This particular example, a 1977 Porsche 930 located in California, appears to have lead a somewhat forgotten life such that it sits now with a mere 18,800 miles on it. At some point in its distant past it was locked away in storage until “found” in 2005. It appears to be mostly original condition and is said to be numbers matching.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

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Limited Edition Double Take: 1977 and 1978 Porsche 924s

Yesterday’s Scirocco is a reminder of the original Volkswagen project for a sporty car based upon pedestrian internals. That project was EA425, and as Volkswagen shifted away from rear-drive platforms towards the new, efficient and cheap to manufacture front-drive arrangement, Porsche continued to develop the prototype. Released nearly in conjunction with the new Golf and Scirocco, the 924 was the first to introduce the world to a water-cooled, transaxle Porsche in late 1975. Yet as they’ve done with so many other models and though the affordable and efficient 924 was a relative hit out of the marks, immediately Porsche began offering special limited models to tick the price up and spur sales.

The result was that effectively every model year early on got its own special model. Today I’ve got two of the early examples; the 1977 Martini World Championship edition and the 1978 Limited Edition model. While neither have much in terms of performance gain, either is an affordable entry-level classic:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini World Championship Edition on eBay

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1977 Volkswagen Scirocco

If you haven’t been paying attention and like the early Scirocco, you’d be forgiven for thinking this was a cheap classic. But over the past year several exceptional examples of the first generation Giugiaro coupe have popped up and the result has been sticker shock. For a while it was only the GTI which generated really big numbers, but a niche appreciation for these little 2-doors has sent prices through the roof.

The first shot across the bow was in April 2016, when a pristine and original survivor ’81 with 51,000 miles hit $17,100 after 95 bids:

1981 Volkswagen Scirocco


That was followed in September of this year by two strong but not original examples; the New Dimensions Turbo example brushing up against $15,000:

First Dimension: 1978 Volkswagen Scirocco Callaway Turbo


And the clean resprayed ’80 hit $9,300:

Wild or Mild? Double Take: 1978 and 1980 Volkswagen Sciroccos


But the culmination of these examples was the best I’ve seen yet. It was a massively impressive ‘1978 that appeared throughout near new, and it was no surprise that bidding at the last moment rocketed up to $17,700:

1978 Volkswagen Scirocco with 27,000 Miles

So it was somewhat without surprise that suddenly my filters are full of early Sciroccos. Over the past few weeks, even more examples have hit eBay in what I can presume is an attempt to capitalize on the capital generated by these cars. The same trend happened a few years ago when we saw big numbers on A1 GTIs. So here we go again, this time with a pre-facelift ’77 model in California:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Volkswagen Scirocco on eBay

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Early Porsche 930 Roundup

Earlier this week I featured a very pretty Emerald Green 1976 Porsche 930. As I then looked around through other auctions I realized it wasn’t the only early 930 currently up for sale in an interesting color. In fact, there were quite a few. It doesn’t make much sense to feature each individually, as much I might like each one. Thus, roundup time!

These aren’t the only early 930s currently for sale, but they are the ones I thought looked the best. They are a fairly diverse group coming in colors both light and dark, vibrant and subdued, and with mileage ranging from the very low (15,054) to somewhat high (115,826). Three of them are Paint-To-Sample and the one that isn’t comes in one of our favorite colors on Porsches from this period. And we even have both engine sizes represented. None of these are boring.

So without further adieu, let’s take a look at these great machines:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

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