1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

I’ve featured a lot of 930s lately. More to the point: a lot of early 930s, especially the original 3.0-liter models. Before moving on to some other 911s I want to look at one more. This one didn’t make my roundup from the weekend because I mostly was searching for bright and unique colors for that post. This one is black so it wouldn’t have made the cut. But it’s quite unique in its own way so worthy of its own post.

While less unique black on black 911s and 930s have their own appeal and their own cadre of fans. For some buyers nothing other than black will do. When used as the color for a car like the 930 that exterior matches the persona of the car itself. Nothing here is to be trifled with. So the color may be common, but that doesn’t mean there’s little appeal.

This particular example, a 1977 Porsche 930 located in California, appears to have lead a somewhat forgotten life such that it sits now with a mere 18,800 miles on it. At some point in its distant past it was locked away in storage until “found” in 2005. It appears to be mostly original condition and is said to be numbers matching.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

Limited Edition Double Take: 1977 and 1978 Porsche 924s

Yesterday’s Scirocco is a reminder of the original Volkswagen project for a sporty car based upon pedestrian internals. That project was EA425, and as Volkswagen shifted away from rear-drive platforms towards the new, efficient and cheap to manufacture front-drive arrangement, Porsche continued to develop the prototype. Released nearly in conjunction with the new Golf and Scirocco, the 924 was the first to introduce the world to a water-cooled, transaxle Porsche in late 1975. Yet as they’ve done with so many other models and though the affordable and efficient 924 was a relative hit out of the marks, immediately Porsche began offering special limited models to tick the price up and spur sales.

The result was that effectively every model year early on got its own special model. Today I’ve got two of the early examples; the 1977 Martini World Championship edition and the 1978 Limited Edition model. While neither have much in terms of performance gain, either is an affordable entry-level classic:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini World Championship Edition on eBay

1977 Volkswagen Scirocco

If you haven’t been paying attention and like the early Scirocco, you’d be forgiven for thinking this was a cheap classic. But over the past year several exceptional examples of the first generation Giugiaro coupe have popped up and the result has been sticker shock. For a while it was only the GTI which generated really big numbers, but a niche appreciation for these little 2-doors has sent prices through the roof.

The first shot across the bow was in April 2016, when a pristine and original survivor ’81 with 51,000 miles hit $17,100 after 95 bids:

1981 Volkswagen Scirocco


That was followed in September of this year by two strong but not original examples; the New Dimensions Turbo example brushing up against $15,000:

First Dimension: 1978 Volkswagen Scirocco Callaway Turbo


And the clean resprayed ’80 hit $9,300:

Wild or Mild? Double Take: 1978 and 1980 Volkswagen Sciroccos


But the culmination of these examples was the best I’ve seen yet. It was a massively impressive ‘1978 that appeared throughout near new, and it was no surprise that bidding at the last moment rocketed up to $17,700:

1978 Volkswagen Scirocco with 27,000 Miles

So it was somewhat without surprise that suddenly my filters are full of early Sciroccos. Over the past few weeks, even more examples have hit eBay in what I can presume is an attempt to capitalize on the capital generated by these cars. The same trend happened a few years ago when we saw big numbers on A1 GTIs. So here we go again, this time with a pre-facelift ’77 model in California:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Volkswagen Scirocco on eBay

Early Porsche 930 Roundup

Earlier this week I featured a very pretty Emerald Green 1976 Porsche 930. As I then looked around through other auctions I realized it wasn’t the only early 930 currently up for sale in an interesting color. In fact, there were quite a few. It doesn’t make much sense to feature each individually, as much I might like each one. Thus, roundup time!

These aren’t the only early 930s currently for sale, but they are the ones I thought looked the best. They are a fairly diverse group coming in colors both light and dark, vibrant and subdued, and with mileage ranging from the very low (15,054) to somewhat high (115,826). Three of them are Paint-To-Sample and the one that isn’t comes in one of our favorite colors on Porsches from this period. And we even have both engine sizes represented. None of these are boring.

So without further adieu, let’s take a look at these great machines:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

Minerva Blue Metallic 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

Minerva is impossible to resist. Among Porsche blues it possesses a combination of brightness and subtlety nearly unmatched for its beauty. It’s a vibrant color, but it’s metallic accents allow it to shine without going the ultra-flashy route of a pastel. In light or dark it just looks great. Others might prefer another of Porsche’s many blues, but for me Minerva is the best.

I’ve featured it quite a few times, both on turbos and standard 911s, but I don’t think I’ve ever featured it on one of the early 3.0-liter 930s. That’s really taking desirable combinations to another level! Here we have a Minerva Blue Metallic 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera, located in New Jersey, with a matching Blue leather interior and 55,423 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Minerva Blue 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

1977 BMW 630CSi

Recently I looked at the one-year only BMW 630CSi. With only 17,000 miles on the odometer and in period correct Reseda Green with slightly updated BBS Mahle wheels, it looked like a great example. Unfortunately, it had three strikes against it; the photography and presentation wasn’t outstanding for the mileage, it was an automatic and the asking price was a steep $20,000.

1977 BMW 630CSi with 17,000 Miles

630s are infrequently seen in today’s market, so it was with some surprise that another 1977 popped up for sale in such short order. This time in Rubinrot Metallic and wearing again updated BBS Mahle wheels with a more aggressive fitment, this E24 is a no reserve auction and, importantly, a 5-speed manual. Is this the one to get?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 BMW 630CSi on eBay

Feature Listing: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini World Championship Edition

In 1976, Porsche won the World Sportscar Championship for makes with successful runs in both the 935 and prototype 936 chassis. The 936 was triumphant at Le Mans in the already famous Martini livery, while a series of 935/76s carried the colors in Group 5 FIA sports car racing. It was there that Porsche introduced the ‘slant nose’ aerodynamic bodywork that became the hot mod on 911s in the 1980s; however, in the 1970s you could get a very nice slantnose Porsche – replete with Martini Racing colors – for a lot less than a 911 Turbo.

To commemorate the success of the 1976 season, in 1977 Porsche released a limited run of Martini-colored 924s. Option M426 was the Martini World Championship Edition, and it cost $450. Add in a removable roof like this one for about $350, and the sticker price of this car just passed $10,000. For that sum, Porsche gave you quite a lot of visual enhancement; bathed only in pure white, the 924’s 8-spoke alloy wheels were color-matched to the body. Martini stripes ran the length of the sides, their design mimicking the wedge shape of the 924. Inside, a special two-tone interior of scarlet corduroy and black leatherette was offset with Martini stripes stitched into the upper portion of the seats and blue piping ran throughtout. A commemorative plaque was added to the back of the center console, too, reminding you that the car you were driving was from the house of a champion. You held a real leather steering wheel, and helping execute your commands was achieved by Porsche adding sway bars to the suspension both front and rear. It was a series of small changes that resulted in a neat package, and one that is sought by collectors of the transaxle design today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini Championship Edition on Hemmings

1977 BMW 525

This probably seems strange at first, but to me this 1977 BMW 525 is the perfect counterpoint to yesterday’s Jetta. Like the Jetta, this Euro-specification 525 is on the low-end of the totem pole in the production scale of even the early E12 5-series. Granted, the introduction of the M30 into the E12 did up the power over the early E10 4-cylinder models; however, in 1977 this M30B25 produced 145 non-fuel injected horsepower – only 15 more than the 520i. The early 5s didn’t have much in terms of luxuries that we’ve come to associate with the benchmark sedan, either – they were fairly basic. But just like yesterday’s Jetta, this 525 located in Bulgaria is worth a long look because of the beautiful condition, which is enough to draw you back to a more simple time:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 BMW 525 on eBay

Ice Green Metallic 1977 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Targa

I think this will be the last of the green 911s I look at this week, though who knows what else I might find. I don’t know if I’d say this one is the most interesting of the bunch – an Irish Green ’65 911 is pretty darn interesting – but this Carrera 3.0 has quite a lot going for it. And it definitely has the longest name. Whereas this week’s 993 Targa seemed like a not too bad price for a nice car that you could spend some time driving and the Irish Green 911 combined very early origins with a great exterior color, this Carrera 3.0 brings with it a wealth of interesting facets. Like Irish Green it too comes in a wonderful exterior color: Ice Green Metallic. The interior too possesses rare, unique, and I think very attractive, Black Watch plaid seat inserts to contrast with the Ice Green exterior. And the model itself serves as the successor to the iconic ’73 Carrera RS. Oh, and the condition looks fantastic! There is A LOT to like.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Ice Green Metallic 1977 Porsche 911 Carrera 3.0 Targa at Hunting Ridge Motors

Year: 1977
Model: 911 Carrera 3.0
Engine: 3.0 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 58,276 mi
Price: $178,900

1977 Porsche 911 3.0 Carrera Targa finished in Ice Green Metallic with Blackwatch Plaid inserts.

1977 Porsche 911 3.0 Carrera Targa European Specifications finished in Ice Green Metallic with Black interior with Porsche Blackwatch Plaid inserts. Imported back in 1985 by it’s second owner, this rare and very desirable 3.0 Carrera Targa produces over 210HP and is actually faster than it’s coveted 1973 911 Carrera RS sibling. It is the only 911 that shares a 930 engine case with the famed 930 Turbo cars.

1977 Volkswagen Scirocco


ANOTHER Scirocco?!?!

Yeah. Another Scirocco. If you can be fascinated by the proliferation of the mega-Beetle 911, though, you can bear with me. Volkswagen’s replacement for the Karmann Ghia, what would become the Porsche 924, proved to be perhaps a step too far for the company. What it created instead, once that was abandoned, was a bit of a legend in its own right. Based upon the pedestrian underpinnings of the Golf but actually developed in tandem and released prior to the more famous hatchback, Giugiaro’s penning of a slinkier two-door coupe variant of the platform was simply beautiful. As the Ghia had before it, it married serious Italian styling credentials with the practicality of an economy family hatchback.

Volkswagen’s new EA827 was the power of choice. Here displacing 1588 ccs and generating 71 horsepower, it was adequate motivation to top 100 mph – just. Amazing at it may seem, the nearly 1.6 liter unit in this 1977 was an upgrade over the 1.5 from the model’s 1974 launch in the U.S., though it only gained one net horsepower. They were diminutive cars; a 94.5 inch wheel base and only 155.7 inches overall, the first generation Scirocco is an amazing 10 inches shorter than the model I looked at yesterday. Even though it had little horsepower, road tests revealed that the Scirocco could out-accelerate a Mustang II Mach 1 (its contemporary) in the quarter mile. How dreary must that shoot-out have looked to our modern eyes? Suspension in front was a strut with coil-over spring setup; the rear was technically independent with a trailing arm configuration. Wheels were 13″ by 5″, or about the same size as modern brake discs on high performance cars.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Volkswagen Scirocco on eBay