1982 Audi Coupe

While the Audi Coupe is no stranger to these pages due to some ridiculous bias by a certain author (ahem), we rarely get the treat of looking at the first half of B2 production. But before it became the “Coupe GT” I so adore, the 2-door basis for the Quattro was simply referred to as the Audi Coupe.

Europeans got a choice of several engines, but in the United States options were limited to one: the WE 2.1 liter inline-5, rated at 100 horsepower. Mated to a wide-ratio 5-speed with economy in mind, these cars were decidedly not as sporty as the later KX- and especially NG-equipped GTs. Brakes were smaller, too – with 4x100mm bolt pattern wheels on the early models sharing duty with some Volkswagens. But the Coupe had a whiff of class that the VWs didn’t manage, and its upscale construction – when well maintained – meant these cars have serious staying power.

Early models, while numerically superior to late GTs, are harder to come across. Audi sold some 4,236 1982s – the Type 85 Coupe’s most successful sales year in the U.S.. However, ’81-’83 GTs are the least frequently seen on the open market here, so this one from Canada looks to be prime to import:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Audi Coupe on eBay

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1982 Porsche 911SC Targa

Speaking of a bright red interior…. Yesterday I featured a 930 Cabriolet that we might almost confuse for the younger cousin of this 1982 Porsche 911SC Targa. The color combination is pretty similar in its general aesthetic, though the colors themselves technically are different. The 930 showed Slate Grey Metallic over a Lobster Red interior. Here we have Black Metallic over a Lipstick Red interior. Both obviously possess the mixture of darkness and bright color that we see quite a bit in the ’80s. We see it still today though in many cases the brightness of the red has been toned down. That’s probably fine, but there is something about a really bright interior that I find particularly alluring.

Lipstick Red is perhaps a little deeper of a red than Lobster Red and of course Black Metallic definitely is a darker shade than Slate Grey. So here we have the deeper, darker, version of that 930, but I think both would appeal to similar buyers – at least regarding appearance as the cars themselves are quite different. They’re unique looks and won’t have wide appeal, but for those searching for one of the more rare 911s this one might suit you well.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC Targa on eBay

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1982 Porsche 911SC Backdate Outlaw

I’ve featured a decent number of these backdated 911s and they always come in a wide range of quality and design. Mostly they’re good-looking 911s and I think we can understand the desire to produce such a build. They combine the beautiful and highly desirable aesthetics of the early long-hood 911 with a more modern and higher performance drivetrain of a Carrera or later 911. They also tend to be a good bit lighter than the original donor.

The consistent problem with these builds is price. Or, to put it more specifically, price relative to the performance gains. Many of these builds retain the engine and transmission of the donor – usually either a 911SC or 3.2 Carrera. In itself that’s fine; those are good engines and with the reduced weight of the build the performance gains and aesthetic improvements are worthwhile. However, this all might cost a decent bit of money, especially if the donor car itself needs some work, and as a buyer you’re only going to pay so much for what ultimately are aesthetic changes.

The way to solve the price problem is with a better engine. The 964 and 993 are both there waiting, it just isn’t as easy to get a hold of what you need. At that point we’re really getting the performance improvements and the higher price begins to make sense. Singer, of course, has made its name using bespoke 964s and can sell them for half-a-million dollars. That’s not at all what this car is. It has, however, chosen to eschew the usual 911SC engine and moved up the chain: a 1997 3.6 liter from the 993. Now we’re talking!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC Backdate Outlaw on eBay

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1982 Porsche 911SC Turbo Look

This 911 is a little bit of a curiosity. It should be of interest to particular buyers and could be a nice opportunity at a unique 911 for reasonable cost, two things that do not always go hand in hand. I’m also specifically interested in what it should cost, but we’ll get into that below.

So what is it? It’s a 1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe with all of the standard 911SC running gear, but with the body, suspension, braking, and interior of a ’88 930. That makes it similar to the M491-equipped Carreras that Porsche made available from the factory, though obviously this one was not built by the factory. An M491 911 can be a pretty expensive purchase. This one shouldn’t be and in that regard provides something different for those who would like a Turbo-look 911, but can’t stomach the high price. It’s definitely in driver level condition, but the engine and transmission have been rebuilt so hopefully it is mechanically sound.

As they say, the devil is in the details and this one definitely will require a knowledgeable person to look it over and insure all of the work was done properly. The current owner has put a decent number of miles on it so hopefully he too can help with those details. If it all checks out, then it should be a fun car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC Turbo Look on eBay

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1982 Mercedes-Benz 500SEC

I’ve been pretty heavy in the Mercedes-Benz C126 the past month or so, but honestly I take them as they come. When it rains it pours and it seems like I’ve just been running across nice SEC, after nice SEC, after nice SEC. Today’s C126, a 1982 500SEC in Arizona is another great example of the Bruno Sacco coupe but this one is a little more special. This car is painted in the ultra-rare Cypress Green and if that wasn’t enough, it’s also a European-spec car that maintains all of its goodies that North American cars didn’t get. The photos and information aren’t that great with this car, but if a car ever had potential, it is this one. But who is willing to take the risk?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Mercedes-Benz 500SEC on eBay

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1982 Porsche 930 Slantnose

We feature the Slantnose pretty frequently around here. Mostly that’s because I like them a lot – especially the coupes. Most of those, however, come from the final few years of 930 production when the factory M505 option was made available. We definitely always have an eye out for one of the rare, and very valuable, examples from 1989. Of lesser frequency (and I’ll admit we may not have featured one at all) are the earlier Slantnose Turbos from before they were made an official factory option. As the seller of this particular 930 alludes, it isn’t always easy to verify such builds. Given the frequency with which we see aftermarket Slantnose 911s – with sometimes very unreasonable prices and uncertain provenance – it is in many cases best to steer clear.

However, that doesn’t mean we should ignore them altogether. Good ones exist and sometimes we see one that combines that audacious sloping front end with rarely seen colors and a price that doesn’t make us shake our head. I think this one fits that bill: a Chiffon White 1982 Porsche 930 Slantnose, located in California, with Brown leather interior (including factory sport seats) and 83,800 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 930 Slantnose on eBay

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1982 Porsche 930

I love a red interior. They come in a variety of shades and a variety of contrasts and as a general rule I like them. Porsche long has been a producer of vibrant red interiors. There are few other marques I can think of that produce as bright a red interior as Porsche does.

But bright red can be tough and this one, on a Black 1982 Porsche 930, I’m struggling to really get into as much as I normally would. The contrast is so stark that the brightness distracts rather than captivates. The pictures will tell the story better than I can describe so let’s jump right in:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 930 on eBay

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1982 BMW 528e

It’s easy when considering BMW’s venerable E28 lineup to skip over most of the production and focus in on two models – the M5 and the M535i/535is. In fact, without intention to do so I think that’s what we’ve done over the past few years. They were the sports sedans that established the benchmark by which all others are judged, notoriously long-lived and arguably still very good value in the used classic BMW market.

Despite that, in the 1980s it was not the M30-equipped E28 that was the most popular. The 533 and 535 models combined for a total of about 34,000 sales in the U.S.. Add in the M5 and you’ve just crested 35,000. In comparison, it was the relatively uninspired 528e that was the sales force for the 5 over the model run. Between 1982 and 1988, BMW dealers sold more than double the amount of 3.2- and 3.4-equipped 5s with the 528e. Just shy of 80,000 of the lowest-spec model made it here, all equipped with what BMW hoped would be the most efficient inline-6 they could produced. The 2.7 liter M20 was de-tuned and strangled to produced just 121 horsepower and a diesel-inspired rev-range. This was achieved by making the stroke longer and installing smaller valves.

Coupled with catalytic converters, the result was a car which met CARB requirements but failed to really excite. 0-60 was a lackadaisical 11.2 seconds. The later ‘Super Eta’ engine added a few more horses but only came at the very end of the run. Yet BMW didn’t want this to be a drag racer; they wanted to make an efficient driver. As a result, the Eta-equipped models had good usable torque down low yet still returned over 20 m.p.g. on the highway. It cost about $30,000 for a modestly equipped model. What was interesting was that BMW sold most of them equipped with the ZF 3HP22 automatic, sapping some of the fuel economy the car was intended to produce and even more performance.

Despite being the most popular model when new, the Eta is generally considered to be the least desirable model for enthusiasts and many have died in junkyards. But once in a while a nice one pops up and is worth a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 BMW 528e on eBay

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Arrow Blue 1982 Porsche 911SC Targa

This car really checks a lot of the boxes for my own personal preferences. So I hope others like it just as much! This is an Arrow Blue 1982 Porsche 911SC Targa, located in New York, with black interior and 105,627 miles on it. The 911SC remains my favorite of the 911 models, not necessarily the best model but my favorite, it’s a Targa, which I love, and it has a bright blue exterior. As far as best 911SCs I’ve featured this one should run close to the Signal Yellow 911SC I featured almost exactly one year ago. I guess this is the time of year for selling my preferred beautiful 911s!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Arrow Blue 1982 Porsche 911SC Targa at Grand Prix Cafe

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Rosewood Metallic 1982 Porsche 928

The 928 still manages to amaze me. Let’s not be confused, this 1982 Porsche 928 is an old car. But it doesn’t really look old. Or at least not in the way most cars from the ’80s look old. The design clearly was ahead of its time – a point driven home by how similar the design remained over the 928’s 17 years of production – and even today the older versions still look good. It is in the interior where things most quickly begin to date themselves, but on the outside the 928’s curves still look fresh. We certainly won’t confuse it for a current production model, but as I said when we compare it to the various cars of its day it just doesn’t quite show its age to the same degree.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Rosewood Metallic 1982 Porsche 928 on eBay

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