1982 Mercedes-Benz 300CD Cabriolet

1982 Mercedes-Benz 300CD Cabriolet

Back in the 1980s when the world was running rampant with small tuning and coach building companies, we were subject to creations like today’s car. This a 1982 Mercedes-Benz 300CD … cabriolet. Yes, someone took a perfectly fine 300CD and chopped the roof off to fully expose you to the wonderful feel and aroma of diesel exhaust. But it was the 1980s and the money was never-ending, so doing things like this made sense at the time. Now that reality has hit us square in the face in 2017 and keeps on punching, we are still left to live with creations like this. Of course with something like this oddity, I have so many questions I can only try my best to explain – poorly.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Mercedes-Benz 300CD Cabriolet on Hemmings

Year: 1982
Model: 300CD Cabriolet
Engine: 3.0 liter inline-5
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 80,235 mi
Price: $80,000

1982 Mercedes-Benz 300TD Cabrio, RARE RARE (One of Five produced) I am 2nd owner / all Books/Records / Boca/Palm Beach (35 year History), Full Navy Leather w/Power top & COLD A/C / 35 mpg / $80k obo/trade. John, 561-818-1900, FL; biondo-palmbeach.com

The condition of the 300CD is actually pretty nice. Looks to be well looked after with no major visible flaws. Sure, it maybe or maybe not has a Nardi steering wheel and maybe that shift knob is a quality piece and not an eBay special. But I’ve seen stuff like this many times over. The white wall tires look odd even with the matching white paint as I’m a firm believer that white walls only belong on the W100 600 and even then I’m iffy on them. I just can’t get over the canvas top and what went into making this happen. A bunch of coachwork houses have done these conversions but none have really stood the test of time or functioned all that well and I’d bet this one is another one of those examples.…

1982 Porsche 911SC Targa

1982 Porsche 911SC Targa

I’m going to stick a little longer with the 911SC for today’s post. Unlike yesterday’s feature and its somewhat audacious interior, this Black Metallic 1982 Porsche 911SC Targa, with black interior and 65,933 miles on it, is a bit more standard, yet in none the less nice looking condition. Though it is less rare than yesterday’s color combination – even if Black Metallic is more rare than a standard Black exterior – I expect this one will be the more desirable of the two. Collector appeal will be lower, but I’m not really sure collectors are paying significant attention to the 911SC in general so that issue shouldn’t affect things too severely. The 911SC remains a great option for those hoping for a classic 911 to drive, so we shouldn’t let lower collector appeal influence our assessment of its merits.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC Targa on eBay

Year: 1982
Model: 911SC Targa
Engine: 3.0 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 65,933 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

1982 911 SC Targa

This 911 Super Carrera is preserved in beautiful original condition.

The 1982 Porsche 911 SC Targa featured here is finished in original rare and desirable black metallic with a beautiful matching black interior and Targa top. Accompanying this investment-grade 911SC is its owner’s manual, service book, and more. We are proud to offer this privately owned incredible Porsche to the most demanding collector, investor or enthusiast who appreciates the investment potential of this great German classic.

This magnificent motorcar looks as if it was in a time capsule and is believed to have only 65,933 actual miles. It comes equipped with nearly every available option. This 911 runs and drives like it is a few years old. Porsche 911’s are known to drive exceptionally well when maintained properly; this is a perfect example of that.

1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe

1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe

This 1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe is pretty interesting for a number of reasons. One of those is perhaps a peculiar reason: it’s up for auction without reserve. Of course, a no-reserve auction of a 911SC isn’t by itself all that peculiar. However, when combined with the other attributes of this particular 911 – the very low mileage, rare interior color, and stated documentation – it is, at the very least, unexpected that we’d see a seller forego a reserve. There was a time a couple years back when I’d be shocked by this and fully would expect the auction to be ended prematurely by a buyer that didn’t want to leave the sale to the chance of an auction.

Those days on the air-cooled 911 market are behind us now, which means there is the possibility for a rare 911SC like this to see a full no reserve auction. And possibly, though here we really will have to wait and see, it may still sell for a fairly reasonable price. This definitely is one to have our eye on.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe on eBay

Year: 1982
Model: 911SC
Engine: 3.0 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 35,032 mi
Price: Auction

1982 Porsche 911 SC
This is NO RESERVE auction for a very nice 2 owner 1982 Porsche 911 SC. This car was one Doctor owned until 2015 when the second owner took ownership. This car has been garage kept it’s entire life and all service records/warranty books are present as well as the original window sticker. This car shows a very low 35k original documented miles. Outside the Zinc Metallic paint is all original. The car has never been involved in an accident or had any paint work. Paint thickness is a consistent 6-9 mil thick all the way around the car.

1982 Volkswagen Scirocco

1982 Volkswagen Scirocco

As I mentioned recently in my 1979 Volkswagen Scirocco post, early water-cooled Volkswagens are really beginning to stretch their legs in value. That’s especially true for survivor cars; those untouched by the hand of times and hands of the traditional Volkswagen crew. It’s unusual to see a Scirocco at all these days, but one in pristine original condition with low mileage? Yeah, play the lottery when that comes across your field of view. Well, at least some (the traditional fans of these cars, for the most part) will now have hope to hit the lotto to throw their hat into the bidding for some of these cars:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Volkswagen Scirocco on eBay

1982 Mercedes-Benz 300CD

1982 Mercedes-Benz 300CD

Another week, another crazy low mileage Mercedes-Benz. Today’s example is a 1982 300CD in Light Ivory with the wonderful Sienna MB-Tex interior. This C123 for sale in New Jersey checks in with a little over 18,000 miles and while the seller explains this is basically a showroom car, but a lot of times I don’t always agree with those claims. This car is an example why.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Mercedes-Benz 300CD on eBay

Year: 1982
Model: 300CD
Engine: 3.0 liter 5-cylinder
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 18,488 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

What is presented before you is the grail of all Turbo-Diesels – a 100% all original, 18,000 mile, two owner , Concourse level Mercedes-Benz 300CD !!! This is an unbelievable, unmolested, pristine, like NEW in the wrapper and very rare W123 Coupe !!!
This car is essentially priceless. This is not to say that the car is worth millions of dollars (nor that it will never achieve such a figure in time). I say priceless because there is no way to put a dollar value on a vehicle as rare as this. There is no other comparison that I know of; it is undoubtedly a one-of-a-kind.
A little history of the car from second owner:
The following information was passed on from the daughter of the original owner to the current collector: For propensities sake, before his passing in his 90s, the original owner had instructed his daughter to sell the car only to a collector. He said “the car is much too valuable to go to anyone else”. After her father’s passing, his daughter enlisted the help of a friend who is a licensed dealer in the state of North Carolina and deals only in high-end European cars. The car was sold to the current collector who has driven the automobile less than 80 miles while in his stewardship.

1982 Volkswagen Scirocco

1982 Volkswagen Scirocco

Yesterday’s 1985 Scirocco was a well modded driver. But if you wanted to win a preservation class – or, just liked the original configuration the car came in – it wasn’t for you. Today’s car answers those critics with a very clean first-year model of the second generation design. Though the shape of the new Scirocco was modern for the time, underneath the specification changed little from the outgoing model. It was still a Mk.1 underneath, with a 1.7 liter, 74 horsepower inline-4 providing adequate motivation to the 2,000 lb. coupe. Where the original Giugiaro design had held lovely nuance, the Karmann-penned follow-up borrowed heavily from the Asso di Picche design (ironically, also from Giugiaro) meaning it was all angles, everywhere. But it pulled it off reasonably well, and the second generation was quite popular, selling about a quarter million units in total. There were rolling changes throughout the years as more power, bigger spoilers and wheels, and even a more traditional second wiper appeared. But in terms of purity, the simple design shows through well despite the clunky U.S. spec bumpers on the early models like this 1982:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Volkswagen Scirocco on eBay

Winter Project: 1982 Mercedes-Benz 280SE

Winter Project: 1982 Mercedes-Benz 280SE

While Andrew and Craig have been the typical purveyors of all-things Mercedes-Benz over the past few months, I’m always drawn to the clean, simple and classic look of the 70s and 80s MB products offered in the rest of the world. Today’s 1982 280SE is a perfect example of this. A W126.026, this European specification S-Class is powered by the M110 double-overhead cam inline-6 which was never offered to U.S. customers. Admittedly, the engine looks a bit lost in the bay you’re used to seeing V8s in, but it’s a proven unit with adequate power – 185 raging ponies, to be exact. However, the 280SE is the short wheelbase model and with European bumpers and missing some of the heavy luxuries, performance should be on par with some of the U.S. spec early V8s, if not better. Even if buying the short wheel base, six-cylinder model may sound a bit ego-deflating, these Euro-spec cars always get my attention:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Mercedes-Benz 280SE on eBay

1982 Porsche 928 5-speed

1982 Porsche 928 5-speed

I’m going to shift gears a little and step over to the front-engine side of the Porsche lineup. We have a couple excellent guest contributors who feature the best and most interesting of Porsche’s front-engined cars so any time I wade into this territory it’s really just with a sense of “hey, I like this car, it looks good and the price doesn’t seem too bad, why not feature it.” So, I like this 928! It looks good and the price doesn’t seem too bad! Here we have a Black Metallic 1982 Porsche 928, located in Tennessee, with Brown interior, a 5-speed manual transmission, and only 54,698 miles on it. It’s said to be in entirely original condition and with good documentation and if those two points both check out it looks like a nice option for a fairly early example of Porsche’s V8 Grand Tourer.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 928 on eBay

1982 Porsche 911SC Targa

1982 Porsche 911SC Targa

In case there was ever doubt whether I’d feature any Minerva Blue Metallic Porsche I come across, here I present another. But this one is worthy of our consideration even beyond the wonderful exterior color. Unlike the past few Minerva examples I’ve featured, which have been high-dollar 930s, this is a fairly basic 1982 Porsche 911SC Targa with a price we can think long and hard about. The seller seems quite knowledgeable about his car and its current mechanical condition and has provided us with a wealth of detailed photos and description with which to judge that condition. It has a Black interior, rather than my preference of Tan, and 142,000 miles on it. Regardless, I imagine I will be quite jealous of the new owner of this beautiful 911.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC Targa on eBay

1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup GTi

1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup GTi

Volkswagen of America’s small pickup truck offered a unique experience at the beginning of the 1980s; basically, the front half of the pickup was a Rabbit, which meant relative comfort, reliability, easy of use and driving and good fuel economy. In back, Volkswagen stretched the wheelbase nine inches and swapped in a tubular axle supported by leaf springs giving the pick up 1,100 lbs of payload capacity and a six foot bed – not too shabby! They even launched a “Sportruck” model, which gave you bucket seats and some really trick decals that covered most of the side. You also got some amazing options for the period, like a tachometer (wooooow) and a 5-speed transmission. However, the mix of 1.7 liter, low compression 8V motors available weren’t exactly going ignite your enthusiast dreams. 78 horsepower channeled through the manual would return a not particularly stunning 0-50 time of 9.7 seconds. 60, you’ll remember, was illegal in the United States at that time, so why bother designing a car that could approach it?

But Westmoreland, PA produced some other neat Volkswagens around the same time, though – notably, the U.S. finally got the higher compression, higher output GTi. Though Volkswagen themselves never combined them, that hasn’t stopped some enterprising individuals:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup on eBay

1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe

1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe

Earlier this week I mentioned that as the air-cooled 911 market has settled I’ve started to come across a lot more classic 911s that appear to be in good condition and also might be had for reasonable prices. For a while it seemed like that was impossible. But here we have another: a Black Metallic 1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe, located in New Jersey, with Tan interior and 85,756 miles on it. The condition isn’t perfect by any means, but as a driver-quality example it looks good and the Black Metallic paint provides a nice change of pace from the usual non-metallic Black with which we’re far more accustom.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe on eBay

1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup

1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup

The advertising tag line for the 1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup was “So American, it’s not available in Germany”. Since the mid 1980s, though, the opposite has been true as the truck range of Volkswagen was removed from the U.S. lineup. In some ways, that’s a bit strange since the small truck market was so strong in the mid-to-late 1980s, but starting in the 90s and culminating in the early 2000s, the small truck market evaporated as the crossover to large trucks became so easy and prevalent. But big trucks have gotten very expensive, and smaller trucks (which really are the size of 1980s full sized trucks) are experiencing a minor resurgence – so much so that VW is rumored to be thinking of bringing the Amarok starting as early as next year. So, let’s take a look back at where the VW pickup began:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Pickup on eBay

1982 BMW 323i Baur TC1 Turbo

1982 BMW 323i Baur TC1 Turbo

In a post I wrote for The Truth About Cars this past week, I covered a few E30 models that offer affordable and interesting visual and performance alternatives to the E30 M3. One of those models was the Baur TC2, the model which gave BMW a soft-top before BMW made its own in 1985. Of course, the E30 wasn’t Baur’s first foray into convertible 3-series models, though, as they had started with the E21 model. Baur only produced a little less than half the amount of E21s – 4,595 according to Petrolicious – as they did E30 models at over 11,000, but as importation of early 1980s cars was easier, it seems more common to see the E21 Baur than the E30 Baur. Though fitted as standard with no performance upgrades, this unique 1982 example remedies that with a turbocharged M20:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 BMW 323i Baur TC1 Turbo on eBay

1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Convertible with 8,000 Miles

1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Convertible with 8,000 Miles

The product catalog for what Formula E is makes for a pretty hilarious read. “Passive Formula-E systems built in to your VW begin with an aerodynamic body design that cuts down on wind resistance.” Have you actually looked at a Rabbit? I guess in terms of footprint, it was physically smaller than a Chrysler Cordoba, so there’s that? But ‘aerodynamic’ is not the first thing I think of when I see an A1. It continues on touting the benefits of radial tires (Wooooow), a high-torque engine (compared to….?), and the George Costanza-inspired “breakerless transistorized ignition”. What it really was was a long 5th gear, denoted on Audis as the ‘4+E’ in the same year. What that meant was it spun the high-torque motor down to low revs, and that road better be pretty flat and not particularly windy if you’d like to maintain any speed. And, if you downshifted to pass anything or go the speed limit, immediately an arrow-shaped light would pop on the dash, reminding you that fuel was being wasted. But Volkswagen claimed it was good for 42 m.p.g. in a period still reeling from the fuel crises of the 1970s, and marketing is marketing.

What the Rabbit Convertible really offered you was one of the very few drop-top options in the early 1980s. Remember, this was a time when Detroit had pulled out of convertibles following hints they would be banned by the NHTSB. Japan didn’t really have much of anything on offer, either, as it hadn’t really established itself fully into the market in anything other than superb economy cars. And Germany? In 1982, you had two options – the Mercedes-Benz 380SL, or the Rabbit Convertible which had replaced the Beetle in 1980. That was it. In some ways, that makes these early Rabbits special, and though these Volkswagens were no where near as dear as the Daimlers, some who bought them treated them as royalty:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Convertible on eBay

1982 Audi Coupe with 36,000 Miles

1982 Audi Coupe with 36,000 Miles

Anthony Bourdain has been pretty successful with his show Parts Unknown, in addition to the many other reasons he’s been an award winning chef and writer. In that show, he’s always on the lookout for new and rarely heard of cuisine from around world. And, for the most part even though I’m not a ‘foody’, I find his presentation, travels, and quick summaries of far reaching historical periods pretty enjoyable. He is, for lack of a better comparison, the Jeremy Clarkson of food critics – at least, a bit. In one memorable-to-me episode, he set out to find this magical, amazing and hereto unheard of cocoa plant. But he wasn’t going just to taste this new and interesting food; he was going to secure rights to harvest the plant and to profit. And, frankly, he couldn’t have seemed less interested or involved in any step of the process. He complained, whined, and lackadaisically mused about the chocolate he’d later offer for $18 a bar throughout the episode, ignoring the cultural and economic aspects of the lives the people of Peru – where the bar’s magical ingredients come from. I was left feeling at the end of the episode that it was less an investigation of the process, and much more an advertisement for the overpriced consumerism he was going to attach his name to. Why wouldn’t you pay $18 for a chocolate bar – he’s Anthony Bourdain and he obviously knows more than you, so ante up!

The point of this is story that I’m left feeling that many of the inflated markets are doing just what Bourdain did; cashing in on a name and a reputation coupled with a market surge. One classic you can get into without all of the market hoopla, though, is pretty much any classic Audi outside of the Quattro – for now:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Audi Coupe GT on eBay