All posts tagged 1985

1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

Some cars will always hook me. Through a combination of a good leading picture and a particular model that, whether I realize it or not, happens to be just the sort of thing I’m looking for, certain ads draw me in and lead to further investigation. Sometimes the joy ends there. With others, like the car we see here, it ends up deserving the extra attention. Here we have a Black 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, located in California, with 53,115 miles on it. Black and Tan (or in this case, Black and Champagne) remains one of my all time favorite combinations and on a Cabriolet it works particularly well since the contrast is made more apparent once the top is dropped. This isn’t a striking combination so much as it is a classic combination. And on the 3.2 Carrera it’s a combination that shows really nicely. With warmer days nearly at hand now is just the time to get into an open-top car!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

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Squint-worthy Survivor: 1985 Audi 4000S quattro

I had a serious amount of nostalgia when I came across this listing; if finding 1980s Audis has become somewhat rare these days, finding ones in good nick has become even more so. But in this case the nostalgia stems from this particular model in this particular configuration; an Alpine White with Brazil Brown sport cloth 1985 4000S quattro. The reason why is that it’s about as close to the first car I owned as you can come. I had this car in this configuration, but a 1986 “CS” model. Outside of the “C” on the rear, the only other change was the addition of the third brake light at the base of the rear window. I didn’t start out looking for an Audi at all, and to be honest when I was 18 the B2 was virtually unknown to me. I tried – and failed – to buy a decent 2002 tii; an exercise that ultimately led a car-selling friend of my father’s to take me under his wing. He claimed he’d find the perfect car for me, and shortly thereafter I found myself paying for a 4000CS quattro without any real knowledge of it. It had about the same mileage as the car shown here, and generally was in good shape. Over the next few years, it would carry me on many adventures; long highway cruises to see friends, trips to the mountains to ski, my first track event, countless drives sideways through the snow – it became as much as friend as a vehicle. Despite that, the day came when I had to move on; owning both a Coupe GT and the 4000, I chose the former as the car to keep and the 4000CS quattro drove away. I’ve often dreamed of finding another in the shape mine left me in. And though it requires quite a bit of squinting due to the unreasonably small photos in this listing, I think this car just about fits the mold:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Audi 4000S quattro on eBay

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1985 Volkswagen DoKa VR6 Swap

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In America, DoKas are so rare that even mediocre examples (albeit with a GoWesty engine) can go for almost $40k. In Germany, you can get this amazing VR6’d DoKa for less than $10k. The matte/murdered-out look is a bit past its prime, but if any sleeper deserves a mean rattle-can job, it’s a crew-cab VW van-truck with more than twice its original horsepower. The seats have been nicely recovered, highlighting an interior that is functional if not cohesive. Double bonus points for the home-brew see-through engine cover. Like a Ferrari, but with a window from West Marine! All told, this is a Vanagamino that isn’t clean or perfect, but it’s not trying to be either. It’s made to blow minds and scare children.

Click for details: 1985 Volkswagen T3 DoKa on mobil.de

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1985 Audi Sport Quattro

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By 1984 the writing was on the wall, and the wild formula called Group B was mutating cars as if they had been supplied nuclear-tainted drinking water. Lancia went from the nutty but awesome and pretty 037 to the much nuttier, much less pretty but significantly faster Delta S4; a mid-engined turbocharged and supercharged all-wheel drive wonder. That matched Peugeot’s effort with the 205 Turbo 16, a mid-engined turbocharged and super-balanced all-wheel drive hatch. The competition was lighter and much better balanced than the Audi was, and all-wheel drive was no longer the trump card. The Audis had been fast but also a bit prone to understeer – something that won’t surprise anyone who has driven a 1980s Audi. Additionally, they were heavy compared to the competition even when fitted with aluminum blocks instead of the road-going cast iron. One last complaint that the drivers had was that the windshield rake meant there was a tendency to have a large amount of glare that distracted the driver and navigators. Plus, Audi was at the limit of what it could develop reliably with the 10 valve turbo motor.

The response was the Sport. To drop weight, Audi chopped the best part of 13 inches out of the middle of the Quattro, making it a two seater unless your passengers had no legs. They took the doors from the short-lived 4000/80 5+5 2-door and the windshield from the 4000/80, too – it was much more upright than the normal Coupe. The flares grew as well, another few inches in girth allowing now 9″ wide Ronal R8 wheels with larger tires. The body was made from carbon fiber and kevlar to help cut weight and was produced by noted special vehicle producer Baur in Stuttgart. And under the vented hood lay what would become the party piece; the 2.1 turbo motor now sporting 20 valves. The result was staggering in terms of road performance; in 1984, the Sport was the fastest accelerating road car you could buy to 60 m.p.h. at 4.5 seconds. Remarkably, 30 years on that would still be considered seriously fast. But it was the belching flames, the wail of the five cylinder and the wild slides that captured the imagination of the world. In rally trim, Audi saw a reported 600 horsepower from the monstrous S1 E2 depending on trim. On the road the Sport only saw half that output, but the Sport received a special interior to match the special exterior – heavily bolstered Recaro seats in special trim and a heavily revised dashboard with more gauges and a new readout. 214 of these special Quattros made it to the road at a somewhat staggering equivalent of $72,000 in 1984 – nearly double what the already expensive long-wheel base Quattro cost. As with all of the special homologation cars from Group B, the Sport was a truly special car then and is perhaps even more revered now:

Click for details: 1985 Audi Sport Quattro on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 1985 Volkswagen Golf 2.0 16V – REVISIT

I’ve been watching this Volkswagen Golf 16V come and go off eBay; non-running, it’s ask was likely too high despite the very cool nature of the car and neat build. Unsurprisingly, it’s continued to drop in price each listing. Now from the original $9,000 asking price when it was offered first in December of last year, it’s down to $7,800 Buy It Now. While that’s a substantial drop in price, I think this one still has a way to go before it’ll be snatched up. It’s a cool bit of Volkswagen history, but in non-running, non-original configuration it’s a hard sale and just a pile of rare assembled bits. I’d guess at $6,000 this car would find a larger audience. What would you pay?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Volkswagen Golf on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site December 22, 2014:

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