1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6

It’s been quite a while since we featured a 911 Turbo 3.6 with an asking price below $200K. In fact, it appears that of all of them we’ve featured only one had such a price. The one we see here, a Black 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 with Cashmere Beige interior and 54,562 miles, is not only priced below $200K, but at $164,000 it’s a good bit under $200K. Naturally, the question is why the price is so relatively low? We’ll speculate on some of that below, but I do also wonder about the prices for these Turbos in general. While so many we have come across were indeed priced above $200K they weren’t exactly selling outside of incredibly low mileage examples. Many auctions were being bid precisely into the territory in which this one is priced. So perhaps the price here is just a realistic one. Imagine that!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 on eBay

Year: 1994
Model: 911 Turbo
Engine: 3.6 liter turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 54,562 mi
Price: Reserve Auction ($164,000 Buy it Now)

New Inventory Alert! So new it’s yet to be detailed! Two owner 1994 Porsche 911 3.6 turbo. Same owner since 1995. 58,000 miles, we have receipts documenting every service and everything performed on the car since the day it left the lot in July of 1994. Recent complete engine overhaul/refresh by Porsche of Naples 5,000 miles ago. Runs/ drives incredible! Is it a sub 10,000 mile garage queen, that will cost you $300,000, No! t has had some repainted panels, has it been driven/tracked? like the pinnacle of all things Porsche of this era should have been. Yep you bet! Has everything, that it has ever needed to be addressed, been addressed when needed.

Pre-A: 1994 Audi 100CS quattro

Audi’s naming convention between 1985 and 1995 was, to say the least, a bit confusing. Audi had already changed its B2 series to the 4000 designation and C2/3 series to 5000 to help differentiate them from the earlier models. Starting in 1986, Audi introduced the “CS” designation. In the 5000 model, that denoted the turbocharged model, as the “S” was lower spec model. The same carried to the 4000 model. In both cases, the “S” model was no longer available with quattro. This was a bit confusing, as the 4000S quattro had been available in ’84/’85, and the ’86 model was effectively identical to the outgoing ’85. It was more confusing, though, in ’87, when the “S” model was introduced with quattro in the 5000 range but not in the 4000.

In 1988, the trim levels changed again. Now the 4000 designation was gone, replaced with the B3 models that brought the small sedans in line with their European counterparts. Now there was a low spec 80 and a high spec 90, both available with quattro. The 5000 soldiered on for another year with only revised badging script to bring it in line with the change.

In ’89, the 5000 was changed over to match the 80/90 with the 100/200 models. As with 80/90, the 100/200 differentiated trim and engine choice. Quattro was available in both models, but the 200s were higher spec and had turbochargers. It made sense.

Things started to get confusing again in 1992, though. Audi was really struggling to make sales in the U.S., and the introduction of the new “S” performance models further muddied the waters as the new C4 was introduced. Gone was the 200, but S/CS designation was back! However, since turbocharged models were limited to the S4 in the U.S., there was no 100S quattro – only the 100CS quattro.…

Porsche 968 Coupe Roundup

The Porsche 968 Coupe 6-speed is a fairly infrequently seen package, but one that is generally considered to be the “ultimate development” of the water-cooled transaxle 4-cylinder models. Only about half of the cars that were imported to the U.S. were Coupes (4,242 sent to North America, 2,234 of which were Coupes), and when equipped with the 6-speed manual the number dwindles to just 1,811. That puts production of these models on par with the E28 M5 in terms of rarity, and the group of enthusiasts who enjoy them are about as avid if not moreso. However, they also often overvalue their cars in the marketplace, making them expensive options relative to the performance on tap.

Today I have a group of no less than three 968 Coupe 6-speeds for sale – a rare Christmas treat to see. Which is the winner of the group?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 958 Coupe on eBay

1994 Porsche 928GTS – 5-speed

When discussing 911s I’ve written at times about what I can best describe as a car’s “presence.” That command of an audience that certain cars possess, but not in the manner of supercar audacity. Many cars attract attention because they look wild. Not so a 911 (perhaps the GT3RS excepted). Yet older models do turn heads and among 911 fans their varying levels of presence stands out. It is subjective, certainly, but I think it’s still a quality we can all understand.

The 928, even though one has not been produced in over 20 years, certainly possesses that sort of presence. Heck, on those very rare times when I see one I try to take as much time to look at it as I can. The design seems so beyond its era, yet not even particularly modern. It’s just a great design that works in a variety of time periods and still looks fresh today. Here we have one from very near the end of their 17 years of production, and it also happens to be one of the very rare manual transmission examples on the market: a Slate Grey Metallic 1994 Porsche 928GTS, located in Texas, with 88,454 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 928GTS on eBay

1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Flatnose

The quest for the ‘Holy Grail’. Everyone has their own holy grail among 911 models and for those that are really particular that search gets parsed even further into specific color combinations on said models. Well, among 911 models themselves the one we see here is the one many will seek. Here we have a 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Flatnose with a scant 2,306 miles on it. The colors here are Guards Red over Cashmere Beige – a not uncommon, but still eye catching combination on any 911. As you’d expect there aren’t many of them (39 were built for the US) so we don’t see them come up for sale often and they’re very expensive. Interestingly, these aren’t the most rare and sought after of these cars. The even more rare ‘Package Car’, distinguished from these by having the standard 964 nose rather than the 968-derived Flatnose, takes relative rarity even further with only 17 having been produced in total, all of which were for the US market. Holy Grail indeed!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo S Flatnose on Excellence Magazine

Northern Exposure: 1994 BMW M3 Canadian Edition

I promise that it was not my original intent to run a Canadian market car this today, but it’s pretty apropos for this morning’s coffee intake. The Canadian Edition M3 is no stranger on these pages; I’ve written up two of the original 45 in the past few months. First was the Mugello Red car which had undergone some changes for stock.. Second was the staggering Individual Giallo example which set what I believe may be a record price for a non-Lightweight car. Today #40 has come up for sale and seems to lie between the condition of the two cars. Presented in fetching Dakar Yellow, where will the price of this E36 end up?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 BMW M3 Canadian Edition on eBay

Irish Green 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 – REVISIT

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The Irish Green 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 remains up for sale with the asking price holding steady at $225K. Given its rare paint-to-sample exterior color and its relatively reasonable pricing I’m actually surprised someone hasn’t snapped this one up. The mileage certainly is higher than many other examples of the Turbo 3.6 we come across, but the Irish Green paint makes it one of the most unique options available. Perhaps some other detail in its history is holding it back?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Irish Green 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site September 7, 2016:

1994 BMW 840Ci

1The E31 8-series (1989-1999) was available in 840Ci, 850Ci and 850CSi guises. The 840 came with a 4.0 liter V8 (later upgraded to 4.4 liters), while the 850 was powered by a 5.0 liter V12 motor. This engine was bored out to 5.6 liters for the range-topping CSi version. (The cousin of an abandoned project to build an M8, the CSi also came with a 6-speed manual gearbox, stiffer steering and suspension, and a model-specific bodykit.) Low slung and sleek, with pop up headlights, no B-pillars and a wedge-shaped profile, the 8-series was undeniably gorgeous. It was also incredibly expensive, both to buy and to repair, and a little underwhelming, particularly in entry level form, where the car’s performance never really matched the highly exotic exterior. That last criticism now seems a little unfair, since these cars were sold as grand tourers, not out-and-out sports cars. Still, the 8-series has remained somewhat under appreciated. As a result, entry level models can be found for a fraction of their original cost. This car is indeed a base model 840Ci, but it’s definitely not cheap. That’s because it carries a number of desirable features and upgrades, including some more usually found on the CSi model.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 BMW 840Ci on Bimmerforums

1994 Mercedes-Benz E500

1The W124 platform E500 – the product of a joint venture between Mercedes and Porsche – has established itself as a firm favorite among enthusiasts lusting after brawny, fast German steel. Hewing close to the late 80s/early 90s super-sedan recipe – big engine, understated exterior, room for four to travel in comfort with effortless rapidity – these brutes have been rising in value of late, with asking prices on mint, low-mileage examples reaching into the $30k plus territory. Over the summer, Paul and I saw a couple of 500Es hanging out at Katie’s Cars and Coffee, the same place, in fact, where a week later a 380SL would rather infamously collide with a Ferrari 458 Speciale. I hadn’t seen a 500E in the flesh for a while, and I was struck by just how muscled and hunkered-down they look. At the time, Paul said to me that “hunkered-down” is exactly how they feel to drive too. I have to take him at his word; sadly I haven’t had the pleasure.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Mercedes-Benz E500 on eBay

1994 BMW M3 Canadian Edition Individual

You’re not going to buy this M3. It’s not because of lack of desire; certainly, a limited run European-specification Canadian Edition M3 is already a very hot commodity. Further upping the ante was the BMW Individual “Giallo” yellow color, slightly different than the standard specification Dakar Yellow. While that may seem like a strange choice, it was what the original buyer of this already very expensive ($60,000 in 1994, about $90,000 today) ordered – and that choice made this particular car the only out of production color in the run of 45. Obviously, since they cared a lot about their prized Euro M3, miles are super low and condition is effectively near perfect. But you’re not going to purchase this car, not because of the colors, or the miles, or the low production number, or even because it’s a Euro car. You’re not going to buy this E36 because the asking price is $65,000:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 BMW M3 Canadian Edition on eBay