1993 Audi S4

I find options on cars very interesting, especially when they’re options that aren’t often selected. Every once and a while, I’ll sit down and build a car on Audi, BMW or Volkswagen’s configuration tool, all the while trying to figure out what will be the options that 20 years from now someone will pine after, or just even smile to see. Today’s S4 is a great example of just that; indeed, if you look at the window sticker, you’ll note that only two options were selected. One was the 10 Compact Disc trunk mounted changer; it was an option my 1993 V8 quattro had and in retrospect I can’t believe they got away with charging $800 for it – I’m reminded of the scene from The Wedding Singer. But that’s not the option I’m really interested in; no, what I find unique about this car is that it was specified to the no charge 15×7.5 Speedline-made option wheels with all-season tires. For a time, Audi even touted that its 15″ option wheels offered better ride quality than the competition’s huge 16″ rolling gear. It was a rarely selected option, and it’s even more rare to find the car still rolling on those wheels 21 years later:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Audi S4 on eBay

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1995 Audi RS2 Avant

In the high performance, exclusive world of Audi’s RS models, most enthusiasts believe they never got it quite as right as they did with the original model. Sure, the RS4s, RS6s, RS5s and TTRSs are impressive, fast and luxurious. They’ll all decimate the roads on the way to your destination, with little regard for supposedly faster marque’s badges. But there was something that was extra special and just a bit more magical about the original RS2; the first of the super wagons, the splashes of red and RS blue were like a poison dart frog – a warning to the rest of the big boys that this little wagon meant business. Packed with a special 311 horsepower Porsche-messaged version of the venerable 20 valve turbocharged inline-5, the RS2 was very special indeed. Power made it to the ground through all four wheels mated to a 6-speed manual transmission with Brembo brakes and Porsche wheels; the small chassis Audi could break 5 seconds in a 0-60 sprint and was good for over 160 m.p.h. making it one of the fastest road cars in the 1990s. About 3,000 of these cars were made, making them not quite as rare as one would expect given how infrequently we see them for sale – but there’s a stunning low mile example today on VW Vortex:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Audi RS2 Avant on VW Vortex

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1987 Audi 5000S Avant with 45,000 Miles

When it comes to memorable Audis from the 1980s, the 5000 undeservedly gets little attention. That’s especially true when you back out the turbo and quattro versions of Audi’s flagship sedan. But in many ways it was the success of the large Audi sedans that allowed for the more exotic Quattro development – and the 5000 was a revolutionary success. Compared with what was on offer from rivals Mercedes-Benz and BMW at the time, the 5000 was downright futuristic and more modern in every way. It was an aerodynamic marvel, quiet and capable of returning excellent fuel economy. It was also hugely practical, too – especially when configured in hatchback Avant spec. Though the sloping rear glass dropped storage space a bit, it wasn’t much – and it’s amazing what can fit inside of these cars. Indeed, I used my 200 Avant to bring a complete 7A inline-5 home; the hatch actually assisted this since we could get the engine hoist over the car – something that would be impossible in most wagons. Still, most enthusiasts want the turbocharged quattro version, leaving the few front drivers that remain throwbacks to a time when a 120 horsepower large wagon was a reasonable option:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 5000S Avant on eBay

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Avant-garde: 1995 Audi S6 Avant Roundup

In the U.S., few Audi models have quite such a devoted following as the 1995 S6 Avant. Not many were imported, and those that were generally have been snapped up by enthusiasts and had miles piled on to them. Some have succumbed to accidents or been organ donors, leaving even fewer on the road 20 years later. However, we have 4 today available – amazingly all in different colors. Which would be the one you would choose? Let’s start with an Emerald Green Mica example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Audi S6 Avant on eBay

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1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro

The less glamorous version of what was a fantastic chassis and engine combination, the Audi 4000 quattro brought rally-bred performance to the masses. You really could think of it as the original “WRX” because while the big-brother Quattro that stole all of the headlines in its day is currently a reasonably good value compared to some of its contemporaries, when they were new the turbocharged, box-flared brother was simply out of reach of most enthusiasts. Original sticker price of the Quattro put it around the same price as a well-equipped Porsche 911; equivalent today to a base model R8. It was therefore very exciting to see a nearly identical drivetrain layout passed down to the more pedestrian sedan version, complete with a similar-sounding inline-5 and locking differentials. You got all of this in a slick-looking 4-door package for around $20,000 – not cheap, mind you, but half the price of the Quattro. For many fans of the Quattro package, it proved to be legendary in its own right:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro on eBay

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1987 Audi Coupe Quattro

Thought they recently have surpassed the 25 year importation boycott into the United States, it’s not likely that you’re ever going to see many of this model car on these shores. Sure, there’s a group of Audi enthusiasts who are particularly excited when they see a B2 Coupe Quattro pop up for sale – a truly rare event in the U.S.. However, clean models demand a serious premium because of their rarity – a premium which pushes them squarely into the price point of the turbocharged, box flared big brother. Though the drivetrains are for the most part the same, the addition of the turbo, bigger wheels and flares changes the category of ownership from neat footnote to headline splash. As such, it’s understandable why the Coupe Quattro is such as niche vehicle. Nevertheless, it’s really neat to see one for sale in the U.S., and this occasion is no different.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi Coupe Quattro on craigslist

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Tuner Tuesday: 1992 Audi S4

If you missed out on last week’s S-Fest II, have no fear. Our reader John has been on patrol and recently sighted this great looking 1992 Audi S4. The 1992 has some nice advantages in stock form over the later run cars; however, this particular example has been further modified with turned up boost, suspension and some European market goodies. In rarer-to-see black over grey leather, it looks like a pretty tidy package:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi S4 on craigslist

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1986 Audi Coupe GT

Do you think you know Audi and Volkswagen products from the 1980s well? There are a lot of people who claim to, but it seems that at times even VAG didn’t know what it was producing. Take, for example, this 1986 Audi Coupe GT. Now, according to most sources for a long time, if you wanted to get the digital dashboard in a 1986 Audi Coupe GT, you had to get the “Commemorative Edition” GT which came only in white or graphite. Yet as the owner of what was originally a Oceanic Blue non-CE Audi GT with an original digital dashboard, I can attest that in fact cars outside of the normal production run were fitted with the somewhat quirky bit of 1980s fad technology. If you talk to most Audi folks, they stand firmly in two camps. The small camp says that the digital dash is really, really cool; the far larger camp sees it as a glitchy gimmick that seldom works properly and is hard to service. But having owned one for the best part of two decades now, I can say mine has never experienced much of an issue. It had neat features, such as the “shut off the entire dash” feature which left you only with a speed reading. I think I used it once, only to show someone that it existed. At startup, you could tell your friends that you had programmed the cover art to Ghost in the Machine by The Police into your dash. Much more fun, though, was the ability on the fly to switch the dash from English to Metric units; if you were alone on the highway with an unsuspecting passenger, you could flip the dash into metric and then brag about how you were going “150” with ease. Okay, maybe I was the only one who thought it was funny, but there really weren’t many advantages to the digital dash otherwise. Despite that a smattering of 1986 and 1987 (non-“Special Build”) cars, seemingly with no particular order or logic, were fitted with the Atari-esque bit of technology:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Audi Coupe GT on eBay

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1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro

“It was bound to happen”. Over the past few months we’ve seen a spike in Audi 4000 Quattro prices, and with the spike the nice examples have started to come out of the woodwork. As a $2,500 car, you keep it until it dies. As a $5,000 car, you treat it well and it changes hands from time to time. Once prices crest $10,000 – prices that 4000s haven’t brought since the 1990 – people start flipping them. It makes sense; the 4000 Quattro is a great car but for $13,000 you can get many nicer, faster cars. Last week I wrote up a Tornado Red 1985 4000S Quattro that had reported fresh paint and seemed to be a good example, but failed to push a price as high as I expect the owner was looking for. Today’s example is arguably a bit nicer, but shown in the same shade – will you be seeing red?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro on eBay

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1984 Audi 4000S Quattro Turbo

We’ve been lucky enough to see a string recently of very nice condition 4000 quattros, with the nicest and highest priced breaking the $10,000 glass ceiling on these models. That’s apparently signaled to other 4000 owners that the market is prime to get out at current top dollar, ignoring the confluence of factors that combined to create that record sale. A super well documented, fully sorted and all original example, that car also found the right buyer at the right time. In contrast, today we have a decidedly unoriginal 4000S quattro with an asking price unsurprisingly right around the sale amount for that 1985 model. Will a modded 4000 bring stronger money than the average? Take a look and see what you think:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Audi 4000 Quattro Turbo on Craigslist.org

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