1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC

Edit 11/1/2017: I was taken to task for my critique of the pricing on this example. The builder and many of his avid fans chimed in to offer more history and background of the build and its thoroughness. Additionally, the seller was able to point toward the $10,000 recent sale of a similar 24V modified Corrado to justify his pricing. It’s a comp that I hadn’t seen and certainly backs up his starting price argument. Thanks for the input to all our readership who know the seller and the build better than I did! -CJ

1992 was an interesting year of change at Volkswagen. At least for the next decade, it signaled the end of the hot water-cooled EA827-derived 4-cylinder models that had made it popular once again as a modern, efficient economy car that was capable of plenty of sport, too. 1992 was significant in this regard, because although the engine labored on for a bit, alongside the twin-cam, high-revving 16V GTI and GLI or the gutsy G60-supercharged Corrado came the new VR6 power unit. Displacing 2.8 liters, the new engine went without exotic forced-induction or peaky twin cams. Instead you just got low-end grunt and great noise, and 170-odd stampeding horses running across the front of your Volkswagen. In short order, the Passat, Jetta, GTI and even the EuroVan all moved to six cylinders.

1992 was even more notable because for the U.S. market it was the sole year where both the G60 and SLC VR6 were available together in the Corrado lineup. It was also unique because of the tones available; Corrados had been available previously in Nugget Yellow LK1B, but in 1992 it moved to Jasmin Yellow LK1D. It then promptly disappeared from the color catalog after few were ordered, making it one of the most infrequently seen tones on an already seldom seen car:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC on eBay

2001 Volkswagen Eurovan Westfalia Weekender

I’ve always been intrigued, and a little confused, by the Volkswagen Van. I first learned to drive on a neighbor’s T2, and I grew up in a period where vans were as cool as it got. Vans were ambulances. Vans were campers. And vans even carried the A-Team. Sure, the GMC Vandura wasn’t a Countach, but to kids in the 1980s it had nearly as much impact, fool!

But it’s not the appeal of these vans that I find confusing at all. The first thing I find hard to follow are the various trim levels. Especially when it came to the T3 and T4 models, things get a bit complicated. You could buy, for example, a Wolfsburg Edition Vanagon in the 1980s and early 90s. This was not to be confused with the Westfalia model, which was notable for having the pop-top. However, there was also a Weekender model, which sometimes had a pop-top but didn’t have the camping accoutrements of the Westfalia. That these were further available in two- and four-wheel drive made things even more confusing, and then – of course – there was a Wolfsburg Weekender for a short period. I don’t even know what came in that model. Well, I do, actually, but the point remains that it was confusing.

The switch to the T4 was pretty revolutionary. Gone was the antiquated rear-engine layout, and cylinder count went up to five as Audi’s 2.3 liter motor was massaged into 2.5 liters with a short stroke for lots of torque in the new Eurovan. These came to the U.S. starting in 1993, and there were two configurations – the Eurovan and the Multi-Van (MV for short). The difference was the seating configuration, in that the MV had rear-facing seats behind the captain’s chairs and a table in the middle.…

1977 Volkswagen Rabbit VR6 24V swap

Did the high-mileage R32 from earlier get you wondering what you might do with the drivetrain? A little over three years ago, we took a look at a special early Rabbit. Dressed in Miami Blue and looking subtly upgraded with Corrado steel wheels and a lower ride height, what the exterior didn’t give away was that lurking under the hood was a 2.8 liter 24V VR6 motor popped in. The swap looked well executed and generally clean outside of some loose wiring, and the builder hadn’t gone over the top with a crazy interior – instead, relying on the original items for a true sleeper status. With a few minor changes like a better executed intake, engine cover and some odds and ends, the car has reappeared with generally the same introduction – but that’s okay with us, because the look is spot on! It’s also a no reserve auction, so we’ll get to see where an honest yet seriously quick Rabbit gets you these days.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Volkswagen Rabbit VR6 24v Swap on eBay

1990 Mercedes-Benz 300E 24V 5-speed manual

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The 1981 Mercedes-Benz 280S we featured on Wednesday got a fair amount of attention, mainly due to its unusual spec. Part of this boiled down to the fact it was equipped with a 4-speed manual gearbox. There’s no telling how many W126 S-classes they made with a third pedal, but my guess would be less than 3% of the production run. The W124 E-class was initially offered in the US market with a 5-speed manual, but few buyers chose this gearbox which led Mercedes to swiftly remove it from the options list. This 300E for sale in Paderborn, Germany, is equipped with the 3.2 liter, 24 valve inline-6 hooked up to a 5-speed manual gearbox. Unlike the aforementioned 280S, this isn’t a poverty spec model. This example has leather, burlwood trim, heated seats, rear sun blinds and other luxury touches that buyers in the US market came to expect from Mercedes. This 300E is also a 1990 model, making it eligible for importation stateside.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Mercedes-Benz 300E 24V on Mobile.de

1991 Mercedes-Benz 300SL 5-speed

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The R129 has always been my favorite iteration of the SL roadster. Softer and more modern than the classic R107 that it replaced, but still sufficiently angular that it doesn’t succumb to the awful jelly bean aesthetic of the late 80s and early 90s, the quintessentially Mercedes design remains attractive today; sporty and taut yet elegant and handsome. While most US buyers opted for the V8 500SL or the range topping and magnificent V12 in the 600SL, the car could also be had with an entry level 3.0 liter straight six, as found in this 300SL version. Already a relatively uncommon spec, this car features the especially rare manual gearbox, available only on six cylinder R129s.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Mercedes-Benz 300SL for sale on eBay

2002 Volkswagen Eurovan

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I’m whole-heartedly behind the thought of an event vehicle, as I want to be able to tow my Audi Coupe GT track car to the event. Why? Well, as fun as it is to drive, driving it hundreds of miles in race seats on race suspension with no radio and no A/C gets…well, trying. But when it comes to towing even something fairly light like my Coupe, the Vanagon is a no-go.

Many years ago I was surprised when a friend of mine arrived at the track towing his E30 M3. It wasn’t that he towed it there, it was what he towed it there with – a then new VR6 24v EuroVan. I starred at the Volkswagen in disbelief; it just shouldn’t have been able to do it, but he assured me that it towed quite well, had room for many or much, and was very comfortable. There’s additionally the benefit of having a dual purpose vehicle; while many “tow vehicles” spend a lot of their time stationary, the EuroVan easily transforms with no modifications to a family truckster with room for most of your child’s grade school class. Even the non-weekender, when pushed, can further double as a light camper. My nomination then for “GCFSB Company Vehicle” is the VR6 24V EuroVan GLS, like this brilliant red one today:

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Year: 2002
Model: Eurovan GLS
Engine: 2.8 liter narrow-angle VR6
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 116,485 mi
Price: $9,995 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2002 Volkswagen EuroVan GLS on eBay

2002 VW EUROVAN. Nice and Sharp Looking loaded with most of the options. Texas Owner so there is absolute NO Rust. compare it with the other vehicles being sold on the North East region with bunch of snow. Even with slightly high miles, it runs and drives awesome.