Feature Listing: 2006 Porsche Cayman S

Feature Listing: 2006 Porsche Cayman S

I sometimes feel I am neglectful of the Porsche Cayman. I write almost exclusively about Porsches and it turns out equally exclusively about the 911. This is by choice, not necessarily by design. The Cayman is (in relative terms) the new kid on the block for Porsche so it doesn’t always possess the sort of historicity that remains rooted in my brain. In simpler terms: these were not the Porsches that captivated me as a kid; not the Porsches that I saw on posters and dreamed about. All of this may be to my loss.

The Cayman is a fantastic car possessing inherently better dynamic balance than its much more well known sibling, the 911. Porsche has been oft criticized for holding the Cayman back, portrayed as fearful that it would overtake their beloved 911, but that doesn’t make the Cayman a family sedan. Impeccable balance, impeccable feel, and still plenty of power for everyday use characterize the chassis. In S specification with a 6-speed manual transmission you’re getting nearly 300 horses propelling a car weighing just over 3,000 pounds. That’s good for 0-60 in around 5 seconds and should you so desire you’ll top out north of 170 mph – not too shabby. There really is a lot to love with these cars and here we have one that comes from the very beginning: an Indischrot 2006 Porsche Cayman S with Sand Beige leather interior and just 31,000 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Porsche Cayman S at Eurowerkz

Feature Listing Double Take: Kachel Motor Company’s 2006 Porsche Cayman S and 2007 Cayman S 3.8

Feature Listing Double Take: Kachel Motor Company’s 2006 Porsche Cayman S and 2007 Cayman S 3.8

While the Porsche 986 Boxster might have been the car that saved Porsche with its massive popularity, the 987-derived Cayman was what made the mid-engine design popular with track enthusiasts. Especially in more potent “S” form, the Cayman is a giant killer with sublime vehicle dynamics and plenty of punch even without a turbo. The 987 refresh in 2005 fixed many of the perceived visual faults of the 986 Boxster design with a slant towards a more aggressive look. The Coupe added a smooth, flowing hatchback line to the 997-inspired exterior, creating a lightweight, 7/8ths scale mid-engine 911. That it was less expensive than the traditional flat-6 lineup didn’t hurt, either. It was, and remains, a hit.

It was no surprise then that immediately these Caymans became popular with track enthusiasts and racers alike, spawning their own race series in the PCA. But you don’t need to fork over $100,000 for one of the rare Napleton Interseries cars to have a lot of fun at the track, as Kachel Motor Company proves with this duo of Cayman S racers:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Porsche Cayman S on Panjo

Motorsports Monday: 2008 Porsche Cayman S Turbo

Motorsports Monday: 2008 Porsche Cayman S Turbo

As Spring 2017 officially kicks off today, my thoughts inevitably turn towards the track. While race series at Daytona, Sebring, Formula 1 (final testing, at least) and even Goodwood have already commenced, as I look out my window there’s still a layer of snow covering the ground and temperatures have barely crept past freezing. It certainly doesn’t feel like Spring yet, but that doesn’t mean that preparation for heading to the track can’t begin. And though I dearly love tracking my Audi Coupe GT and it’s racked up some serious mileage on the race courses of New England, I can’t help but think that maybe it’s time for something newer. Maybe something like a Porsche Cayman, the “affordable” way into a track-friendly performance Porsche:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Porsche Cayman S Turbo on eBay

Motorsports Monday: 2009 Porsche Cayman S Interseries

Motorsports Monday: 2009 Porsche Cayman S Interseries

Porsche history has always been intrinsically linked with racing since before they were even a company. From Mercedes-Benz to Auto Union and later Cisitalia, Porsche offered world-beating designs prior to establishment of its own independent racing heritage. Since the 1950s, they’ve never looked back, and every successive generation has their own legends that were born. For my father, it was the 908 and 917, while I grew up with the turbocharged whistle of the 956 and 962 dominating race tracks. To capitalize on this nostalgia, coupled with more gentleman drivers heading to the track every weekend than there ever have been, Porsche’s lineup has increasingly focused on track-biased cars. But that hasn’t stopped some from going a few steps further, and Napelton Porsche launched an interesting idea just before the turn of the decade.

Why not create a race series of equal cars, slap historic liveries on them, and hit the track? The Interseries was just that, with door to door action pitting the iconic color combinations of Porsche history at the hands of mere mortals. From the Salzburg 917 that first took Porsche to the Le Mans title to the unmistakable Rothmans colors, each of these cars wore a bit of what made the marque a legend for so many people. Everyone has their favorite design, so this series offered Porschephiles a veritable cornucopia of visual pleasure. Today, one of these cars has come up for sale:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2009 Porsche Cayman S Interseries on eBay

1991 Mercedes-Benz 300E 3.4 AMG

1991 Mercedes-Benz 300E 3.4 AMG

1
Back in the 80s and early 90s, when AMG was an independent tuner not yet folded into the Mercedes-Benz family, those looking to soup up their Benzes could have their cars delivered to an AMG-authorized dealer for the installation of a range of body, suspension and engine upgrades. As a result, there are a number of “mix and match” cars from the period with bespoke configurations, making the authentication of pre-merger cars today quite difficult. The most famous car from this period is probably the “Hammer,” the AMG-tuned, V8-powered, wide-body kitted version of the W124 platform E-class (there’s a neat little video of Chris Harris driving one here). While the Hammer continues to be highly sought after, and priced accordingly, less well known is that AMG also produced a tamer version of the W124, the 300E AMG. This offered the brutish exterior styling of the Hammer while retaining the M104 six cylinder engine, bored out to 3.4 liters.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Mercedes-Benz 300E AMG on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 Porsche 930 Coupe

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 Porsche 930 Coupe

Modified cars from the 1980s enjoy are and interesting exercise in dichotomy. Take AMG, for example – add the flares, wide wheels, hunkered down suspension and turned up engine to a W126 and the asking price increases from a standard model by a factor of ten. What is strange about the AMG model, though, is that enthusiasts of the Affalterbach company accept licensed installers as proper original builds. Such is not the case when it comes to tuners like Alpina, Hartge and Ruf; generally speaking, in those cases the only “true” original examples came from the manufacturer’s facilities in Germany. In these cases, examples that are properly sorted and original can be worth double, triple or even quadruple what an identically modified car from a licensed installer in the U.S. would be worth. On top of that, AMG continues to be a bit of an aberration in the tuner realm since most other period modified examples of Porsches, BMWs, and Audis are worth less than a pristine stock example. It’s a bit of a head scratcher, since generally speaking, companies such as Alpina and Ruf put out equally good looking products when compared to AMG, and properly modified were just as luxurious and just as fast. Nevertheless, a tastefully modified example like this period Ruf-modified 1987 Porsche 930 just doesn’t seem to draw the same attention as a AMG 560SEC Widebody 6.0 would, for example. Let’s take a look at what a reported $75,000 in mods got you in the late 1980s:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 930 on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1989 Ruf BTR 3.4 Cabriolet – REVISIT

Tuner Tuesday: 1989 Ruf BTR 3.4 Cabriolet – REVISIT

Back in October I took a look at a Ruf Cabriolet. Originally listed as a BTR3, the listing has been corrected to refer to the car as a BTR 3.4. Last time around one of our knowledgeable readers commented that there were injection differences between the two. There’s also been a pretty substantial price drop of $40,000 to a still nose bleed-worthy $200,000. Is it likely to find a home this time around?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Ruf BTR 3.4 Cabriolet on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site October 13, 2015:

Tuner Tuesday: 1989 Ruf BTR3 Cabriolet

Tuner Tuesday: 1989 Ruf BTR3 Cabriolet

I have to admit, I really don’t get fast convertibles. You could argue that the top down lets you hear the roar of the exhaust, I suppose. Or you could suggest that the faster the acceleration and higher the top speed, the more alive you feel as the wind rushes through your hair. It’s not that I don’t think certain fast convertibles aren’t attractive, mind you, or appealing in their own way. And some modern convertibles are downright amazing in their ability to channel the blowing atmosphere away from you. But in all honesty, once you’re above highway speeds, the expensive radio and million plus horsepower are lost upon me, obscured in a veil of churning oxygen, nitrogen, and other trace elements. Perhaps I’m in the minority and it could have to do with the not-always awesome New England weather, but I’d prefer a sunroof coupe in most applications – with some notable vintage exceptions like pre-War cars and Pagoda SLs. Of course, I suppose if you argued that you weren’t going to break the speed limit (okay, but not by much…) or head to the track, then the convertible arrangement offers you plenty of speed in for your driving pleasure and the thrill of the open-air experience. Want to know what it felt like to be the Red Baron, for example? This Ruf BTR3 Cabriolet could sure help:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Ruf BTR3 Cabriolet on Hemmings

Motorsports Monday RS Style: 1979 and 1987 Porsche 911s

Motorsports Monday RS Style: 1979 and 1987 Porsche 911s

It goes without saying that the Porsche 911 is one of the most popular modified chassis ever conceived, and a fair amount of those modifications are track-based. The results are sometimes mixed; however, one of the more popular trends which I think is pretty slick is backdating 911s. It’s ironic, since for some time it was more popular to update the looks of many of the older race cars to new 964 or 993 bodies. However, the surge in pricing in the 1960s and 1970s 911 market has resulted in many backdated cars coming to market. Obviously, the advantage is that you get a better driving and more powerful car with more options than original, but it’s got the look of the sought after early models. However, probably the biggest advantage is that of price; with a lower entry cost, prospective buyers aren’t afraid to use the 911 where it is well suited; driving fast on a race track. Today I have two different takes on backdated 911s, both with a nod towards the mega-buck RS model. Which is the one you’d choose?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 Ruf BTR Lightweight

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 Ruf BTR Lightweight

While there are a plethora of Porsche 930s sporting Ruf details, when you get into the real Ruf vehicles you have crested a very high mountain of performance. Rufs emerged in the 1980s as the ultimate giant killers; cars whose performance exceeded the expectations of everyone in the motoring press and every stock vehicle they came across. Put simply, there were just no cars that were faster; even Porsche’s legendary 959 was bullied by the equally revered Ruf CTR Yellowbird in a high-speed test when they were new. They were, and remain, the most expensive and most highly sought modified Porsches available. Add to that the specialized lightweight versions of the already exclusive Rufs, and you’ve got something truly special and unique:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Ruf BTR on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1988 Porsche 911 Turbo Ruf BTR 3.4

Tuner Tuesday: 1988 Porsche 911 Turbo Ruf BTR 3.4

Here’s the question of the day: do you need an original? Perhaps, if you have quite particular taste and your pockets are quite deep, yes is the only option for you. Perhaps you don’t feel like you could possibly turn up for a track event, coffee and cars, or club car show and explain to people that your pride and joy is a replica or car that was converted in the style of the originals. But to me, if it looks like a duck, quacks like a duck, and – as in this case – goes like a duck, perhaps it doesn’t matter that it didn’t leave the egg as a prized duckling. Ruf cars are some of the most highly sought tuner cars ever produced – and these days, a real-deal Ruf BTR will set you back a pretty penny; but then, so will a mint condition 930. 930s have recently undergone a serious spike in prices; perhaps recognition by the market that they’re a lot more car than a E30 M3 and probably should be priced below one. So what we have here is a great looking 930 that has been given a host of BTR upgrades by an authorized Ruf dealer. Is it worth the price of entry?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 911 Turbo Ruf BTR 3.4 on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 2007 Porsche Boxster S Ruf 3400

Tuner Tuesday: 2007 Porsche Boxster S Ruf 3400

Without a doubt, Ruf is one of the most popular tuners in the world, but enthusiasts draw a strong line in the sand over what can and should be considered a Ruf automobile. For the most part, their enthusiasm generally falls off once the car in question does not carry an official Ruf vin plate. But are there extenuating circumstances that allow some cars to still be considered from the maker? Maybe you can help decide on today’s 2007 Boxster S, a car sporting $43,000 worth of Ruf modifications and available for sale on Ebay:

Year: 2007
Model: Boxster S
Engine: 3.4 liter supercharged flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 24,859 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Porsche Boxster S Ruf 3400 on eBay

Ten years after the Boxster roadster debuted, it continues on as Porsche’s least expensive model, and remains one of the most thrilling cars on the road for the dollar.Two engines are offered, with a horizontally opposed six-cylinder 2.7L engine appearing on the base Boxster and a 3.4L version of the same engine found in the Boxster S. The smaller engine produces 245 horsepower, while the S has 295 horsepower on hand. Both powerplants use VarioCam technology for 2007 to vary both the valve timing and the valve lift on the intake camshaft. The result is increased power and improved fuel efficiency.The base Boxster has a five-speed manual transmission with a manual six-speed optional. The S gets the six-speed standard, and both models can opt for a five-speed Tiptronic transmission with gear selectors mounted behind the steering wheel.A mid-engined design gives the car a low polar moment of inertia, which enables the Boxster to navigate turns with a nimbleness that has to be experienced to be believed. The extra oomph of the S is helpful when putting the power down coming out of the corner, but the basic Boxster is also a highly entertaining and exceptionally capable vehicle.The Boxster is very well equipped, with heated power mirrors, power leather seats, power windows and locks, an alarm system, and automatic climate control.