How Low Will It Go?: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S Andial 3.8

Edit 11/17/2017: After three years with a over $230,000 asking price with the same seller, ask on this neat Andial-modified Carrera S has finally dropped to $149,993. Of note is that in over three years, the picture, description and mileage have never changed. A neat car, but buyers should do some heavy investigation before the deposit. Is this car a sign that the air-cooling market has also struck the 993, or is this just an aberration?

The 993 is, without a doubt, one of the more desirable 911s in the range of cars that span several generations. Enthusiasts agree, having quickly pushed prices up on these models over prior generations like the Carrera 3.2 and 964. In fact, it doesn’t ever seem like prices on these cars came down much – as soon as the 996 arrived, faithful flocked towards the older models, snapping them up. Especially sought are the Carrera 4S and Turbo models – but there are some really rare gems hidden that pop up from time to time. Obviously, the ultra-rare Turbo S, Carrera RS and GT2 models are a great example – quite rare indeed. I’ve also previously written up an even more rare Andial Twin-Plug Twin-Turbo, one of the reported 19 assembled by the noted factory approved race tuner. Today’s car, like that car, mixes some of the styles of the rare cars that we didn’t get or didn’t see many of. The base is the already semi-rare Carrera 2S; like the 4S, the body shell was shared with the Turbo, but unlike the all-wheel drive variant, the Turbo’s upgraded brakes didn’t carry over. To solve that, the owner of this car turned to Andial – with a host of exterior upgrades to make it look like a Turbo S and a host of RS-spec 3.8 upgrades to make it go well, this is one tidy package – and exceedingly rare:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera 2S Andial 3.8 on eBay

Feature Listing Double Take: Kachel Motor Company’s 2006 Porsche Cayman S and 2007 Cayman S 3.8

While the Porsche 986 Boxster might have been the car that saved Porsche with its massive popularity, the 987-derived Cayman was what made the mid-engine design popular with track enthusiasts. Especially in more potent “S” form, the Cayman is a giant killer with sublime vehicle dynamics and plenty of punch even without a turbo. The 987 refresh in 2005 fixed many of the perceived visual faults of the 986 Boxster design with a slant towards a more aggressive look. The Coupe added a smooth, flowing hatchback line to the 997-inspired exterior, creating a lightweight, 7/8ths scale mid-engine 911. That it was less expensive than the traditional flat-6 lineup didn’t hurt, either. It was, and remains, a hit.

It was no surprise then that immediately these Caymans became popular with track enthusiasts and racers alike, spawning their own race series in the PCA. But you don’t need to fork over $100,000 for one of the rare Napleton Interseries cars to have a lot of fun at the track, as Kachel Motor Company proves with this duo of Cayman S racers:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Porsche Cayman S on Panjo

1993 BMW M5 Euro 3.8

At first glance, I was sure we’d covered this car before. After all, it’s not often that European specification 3.8 liter M5s come to market in Daytona Violet.

Or, is it?

Believe it or else, this is actually no less than the third Purple Porsche Eater that we’ve covered for sale in the U.S.. Back in September, Craig spotted chassis GD63734for sale. If that wasn’t surprising enough, I was pretty sure when Craig wrote that car up that it was the identical twin of chassis GD63657 – a car I thrice covered with three different sellers. But, no – today’s car is a chassis GD63375, produced before those other two 1993 examples, yet in the same outrageous shade of Daytona Violet Metallic:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 BMW M5 Euro 3.8 on eBay

Capitalizing on an Air-Cooling Market? 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport Tribute – REVISIT

Generally, I try to stay away from regurgitating material. However, once in a while a special car that makes me look back comes along, and today’s 911 Carrera RS Clubsport replica was certainly worthy of such devotion of time. The build was exhaustive and utilized factory parts throughout. The result? Stunning, to say the least! But, of course, since I originally wrote this car up nearly 3 years to the day ago, the air-cooled market has both soared, and for most models, gently cooled. The cars that remain at the top have been extraordinary examples such as the ultra-limited RS, turbo and truly special examples of the early and late air-cooled cars.

Where does a tribute car factor into this? Well, that’s tough to judge. That the car didn’t sell at its original $145,000 asking price is somewhat telling. However, three years on the car is now valued by the same seller at double the original asking price – now, $285,000. Before you punch your computer screen and throw insults vicariously through your keyboard, let’s put that into perspective. The last factory RS Clubsport we looked at stickered nearly $100,000 more than this car. Another, closer visually to the look of this car equipped with the spoilers and Speedline wheels, was asking nearly $300,000 more than this tribute. Still, it’s going to take just the right person who likes the looks but doesn’t care about the authenticity to stomach the mortgage payment for this ’95.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 RS Clubsport Replica on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site December 3, 2013:

Motorsports Monday: 1995 Porsche 911RS Carrera Cup/3.8 RSR

Race cars, by definition, don’t lead a pampered life. Often they’re tossed around, crashed, bashed, and driven hard when wet. They are infrequently all-original, as many go through multiple changes in rules (even within a single season) and need to evolve to remain current. Also infrequently do they stay with one owner, changing hands multiple times as the years pass more quickly than laps. Then, a generation on, they’re no longer competitive and shelved in favor of the newest, greatest and latest track weapon. In short, they’re pretty much a collector’s nightmare.

But over the past decade a growing appreciation for vintage motorsport means there is increasing attention focused on ex-factory race models. And, even though the air has cooled slightly on the Porsche market, it’s still at a pretty astronomic level. Put those two factors together with a low production period racer, and even though it’s far from original condition, it’s the recipe for enthusiast’s dreams and an asking price high enough to make small African nation dictator’s son feel jealous.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911RS Carrera Cup/3.8 RSR on eBay

1984 Mercedes-Benz 380SEC

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The W126 coupe has always been pretty popular and for good reason. It’s well-built, reliable, has classic looks and can eat up the miles effortlessly. Back when the getting was good in the 1980s, the C126 was so popular that many gray market cars made their way to the US before Mercedes put an end to that. This car for sale in Miami is just that. A grey market car that made its way to America and was probably used by someone who had a strong resemblance to Sonny Crockett or Rico Tubbs because a Testarossa was really expensive. Now that it’s 2016 and 1980s fashion is a popular Halloween costume, the value and collectability of cars like today’s is in sort of in limbo. So let’s try to break down the desirability of this golden coupe.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Mercedes-Benz 380SEC on eBay

Motorsports Monday: 2016 Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport

The popularity of track days and amateur racing is at perhaps an all-time high, with seeming countless versions of track-prepared options out there. Back in the 1970s, there were basically no track-ready options available. Even when supposed track-derived cars arrived in the 1980s, they wouldn’t hold up to hot-lapping for very long. But today you can pop down to your Porsche, Audi, Aston Martin, Ferrari, and even Bentley dealer and walk out with a full factory prepared race car. The Porsche model which traditionally has carried this flame was the 911, first with the RS models followed by the GT3. But they’ve gotten hugely expensive, and Porsche has another popular track platform in the Cayman. Recently gussied up for track duty in the GT4 model everyone is swooning about, the Cayman is better prepared than ever to take on your favorite track. And by track, for many that means garage, waiting for the model to appreciate. But Porsche also released a full turn-key race version of the Cayman to the public this past year. With a mid-mounted 385 horsepower 3.8 flat-6, motivation wouldn’t be a problem. Porsche ups the track-bias with the 6-speed PDK, a factory roll cage, gutted interior and lightweight aluminum/steel hybrid panels, 15″ 6/4 piston brakes, and a slew of GT3 bits. You could even get a 26 gallon endurance fuel tank. But unlike the normal Porsche factory race cars, this fully-prepped GT4 Clubsport would run out the door at $165,000:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche Cayman GT4 Clubsport on eBay

Motorsports Monday: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup 3.8 RSR

Over the weekend I took advantage of some frankly great streaming video from the IMSA Racing application to view some of the Rolex 24 at Daytona. And the action was thrilling, with several classes being decided not in the last hour, but in the last minutes. Of particular interest to me was the GTLM category, where Porsche had been going round after round with team Corvette over the past few years. And while they weren’t challenging for the overall victory, it gave me pause to consider Porsche’s contribution to racing. You see, Porsche has recorded 22 overall victories at Daytona, but what’s perhaps more impressive is the claimed 77 class victories they’ve claimed. It wasn’t to be this year, but one of the 991 RSRs did make it to the podium. Fitting, then, that we should look at one of the more impressive and expensive variants of the 911 RSR; the 993 Cup 3.8. Only 30 of these racing variants were produced; less even than the road-going 3.8 Carrera RS with which it shared its name. Lightened, widened and with something like 400 horsepower coming from the race-prepared motor, these are still seriously potent track weapons today some 20 years later:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup 3.8 RSR on Race Cars Direct

Motorsports Monday: 1979 Porsche 911

A friend of mine and I were sitting around recently, musing over what kind of 911 we’d own if we had the money. The genesis of this was his Porsche 911 ownership; he had a ’85 911 cabriolet, and while he enjoyed the car it was a bit….well, basic in terms of creature comforts and ride quality compared to his current M3. There’s some charm in that, but having driven both I’d agree that the M3 is the better day-to-day car in nearly every way. But both of us agree that, money no object, the idea behind the Singer 911s is pretty compelling; take a more modern 911 and give it the classic look, but keep most of the modern amenities plus the modern powertrain, brakes and handling. It’s become quite a popular recipe, and with classic 911 values seemingly on an endlessly rising trajectory it’s quite viable to restore or resto-mod a 911 into a dream ride and make your money back, if not then some. Today’s example is pretty interesting and unique, though – I believe it’s the first time I’ve seen someone take a 930 chassis and turn it into a “regular” 911. Backdating the late ’70s look to the early 1970s and adding in some of the iconic IROC bits, the builders took modern Fuchs replicas and a built up 3.8 naturally aspirated motor and created one pretty awesome package:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 911 on eBay

Motorsports Monday: 2007 Porsche Cayman

I really like the concept of the Cayman. Mid-engined, manual gearbox, rear drive and a lighter chassis are a return to the roots of Porsche – the Auto Union Grand Prix cars first designed by Ferdinand Porsche in the 1930s. Dynamically, it’s hard to fault the Cayman, too – on track, they’re simply magnificent, dispatching corners and straightaways with ease, rippling pavement in braking zones. I was lucky enough to spend some time on track in a then-new ’09 fully loaded S; it immediately put you at ease, the capabilities of the chassis left plenty in reserve even when you entered corners at seemingly inappropriate or inadvisable speeds. Fit and finish-wise, they’re a Porsche through and through; beautiful paint, striking wheels, and luxurious interiors. The soundtrack is pretty great, too. One area that I’m not convinced? The looks; some look great, while others look slightly out of proportion to me. One great upgrade that you can do that really makes the Cayman look more purposeful, though, it to equip the front end with big-brother 911 GT3 items. The result is much more aggressive, and paired with some racing graphics, a huge rear spoiler and the right bits inside, you’ve got yourself a budget Cup car:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Porsche Cayman on eBay