1990 Mercedes-Benz 300CE

Last week I check out a CLK55 AMG and felt like it was missing something. Not only was it missing something but it had a different feel from Mercedes coupes of the past. I understand it though, it was a transition from an era of analog to a launch of much more modern renditions. From the W124 to W210, the W140 to W220 and even the W202 to W203. All those cars looked and felt significantly different. You saw the line in the sand when everything changed. But I can’t blame them nor should anyone else. Evolution is a thing with cars and if you don’t, you’ll be eaten alive by competitors. Suddenly your legacy buyers who have owned your cars for 25 years have jumped shipped for Lexus.

But the good thing is that you can always go home. And for a lot of people, the W124 is home. It was the perfect mix of old school Mercedes but you still got modern features. For some, the W124 coupe is that perfect home feeling.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Mercedes-Benz 300CE on Hemmings

Model: 300CE
Engine: 3.0 liter inline-6
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 184,000 mi
Price: $6,500 or Best Offer

This 1990 Mercedes-Benz 300CE has 184k miles and is powered by a 3.0L 6 cylinder engine with automatic transmission. The W124-based coupe is mechanically sound and ready for a cross-country trip, with no rust. Recent maintenance includes a 4-wheel alignment, new front brakes, new front window switch, new full exhaust and oil change. The car was purchased new in California and is on owner 4. The car has a detailed mileage history and has been well kept over its lifetime.

Detailed Videos Available Here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtiAsXmWVVyIXwKyZ5KSqDCWdNO3LuJKV

The 300CE coupe was based on the W124 E-Class and has a slightly shorter wheelbase than its sedan sibling.

1990 Mercedes-Benz 300CE

The 300CE  joined the W124 lineup in 1987. These cars offered the same levels of reliability, passenger comfort and safety as the sedan, but with a shorter body, two doors and no B-pillar. This gave the coupe a much a rakish, sporting look. But there can be no mistaking its provenance: the coupe retains the elegant, taut and brawny good looks of its sedan sibling, and both are unmistakably the work of famed Mercedes stylist Bruno Sacco. Powered initially by the 3.0 liter version of the M103 SOHC engine, in 1990 the CE’s motor was swapped out for the M104 DOHC unit, which increased power output to 217 hp (the engine was revised again in 1993, bumping displacement to 3.2 liters, but power output remained the same).

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Mercedes-Benz 300CE on eBay

Double Take: Mercedes-Benz 300CE – One cheap, one not so much

To some, the W124 might look like just another Stuttgart taxicab. But to those in the know, the 80s/90s era E-class stands for all those traits that once made Mercedes-Benzes the best cars in the world: over-engineered, incredibly safe (for the time) and remarkably durable, capable of cracking over half a million miles if properly cared for. While I’ve written up a number of sedans in the past, I haven’t posted many coupes. That’s a regrettable omission; the coupe offers all of the aforementioned characteristics only repackaged into a stylish, pillarless two-door body shape. The 300CE, produced between 1987 and 1995, was built on a slightly shortened version of the sedan chassis. Initially powered by the SOHC 12v, 3.0 liter version of the M103 engine – good for about 180 hp – cars sold from 1990 onwards came with the DOHC 24v M104 motor instead, pushing output to around 217 hp.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Mercedes-Benz 300CE on Ft. Myers, FL Craigslist

Tuner Tuesday: 1988 Mercedes-Benz 300CE AMG Mosselman Twin Turbo

There is a fairly substantial problem with pre-merger AMG products: documentation. At this point, the newest of the pre-merger cars are on the verge of being considered antiques in many states, and with Mercedes-Benz takeover of the Affalterbach company, much of the documentation of the early models production numbers is lacking. They’ve often changed hands multiple times as styles and tastes have changed, and the paperwork accompanying their builds isn’t always present. Further complicating this was the model that AMG followed. Unlike, say, a Ruf BTR, there was no specific mold to most of the AMG products. Instead, individual taste and monetary resources determined how many of the à la carte options would be tailored to your individual Mercedes-Benz. Also unusual was the AMG authorized dealer-installed model, which meant that you could get an authentic AMG install in California, for example. You could also apparently claim your AMG heritage with as little as three accessories installed, leaving a broad interpretation of what makes a “true” AMG build. Lastly, the popularity – especially in recent years – of AMG products means that there are a plethora of replica kits and pieces that are available. And, at first glance, this W124 would seem to be the product of just that – replete with “custom” AMG seatbelt covers and an ill-fitting C126 hood conversion, for example. But this W124 is much more:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Mercedes-Benz 300CE Mosselman Twin-Turbo on eBay

1990 Mercedes-Benz 300CE AMG 3.4 Widebody

1This car couldn’t be more different from yesterday’s slightly dodgy “AMG” 190E. While that W201 was in rough shape and of dubious authenticity, this low-mileage, AMG-tuned, widebody W124 coupe appears to be both the real deal and in glorious, mint condition.  There’s no denying that this black on black 80s bad boy has incredible presence, with deep dish wheels and bulging fender flairs. Unfortunately, it also comes with hefty price tag to match.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Mercedes-Benz 300CE AMG 3.4 on eBay

1992 Mercedes-Benz 300CE-24 Lotec

The Mercedes-Benz E-class coupe isn’t what you’d consider sporty, but it didn’t try a few tuners from having a crack at it when this car when it debuted in the late 1980s. While there were numerous Lorinser and AMG variants on the scene, the tuner Lotec is a much less known commodity, a firm based out of Kolbermoor, Germany that got its start with Formula V. Fast forward to the 1990s and they were busy cranking up the volume on production Mercedes-Benzes, along with the production of a supercar, the C1000 and numerous turbo kits for Ferraris. The company took time out, however, to tune this impressive 1992 300CE-24 that is for sale in Nuremberg.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Mercedes-Benz 300CE-24 Lotec on Mobile.de

Tuner Tuesday: 1988 Mercedes-Benz 300CE Twin Turbo AMG

Potential is something that often goes unrealized. In the car world, that means that even though you select the right ingredients, the potential of a great recipe is sometimes led off track by poor execution. The delicate balance between tasteful and tacky was tread upon far too often in the 1980s, but even today that line continues to be stepped over. It would seem that tuners, as Charlie Murphy once memorably said, are “habitual line steppers”. On paper, a turbocharged W124 with AMG body styling and some wicked AMG OZ wheels would be perfect, even if presented in too-typically 80s “Charlie Sheen White”. But then take a look at this W124, and there are a few details that will probably leave you shaking your head…

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Mercedes-Benz 300CE Twin Turbo on eBay

1993 Mercedes-Benz 300CE-24 Cabriolet 5-speed manual

The W124 Mercedes-Benz E-class convertible isn’t exactly what you would consider a sporting drive. It’s a thoroughly competent cruiser and can handle itself in the twisties, but this is a car meant to cosset you as you motor, top-down and enjoy the passing scenery at a more relaxed pace. It is, simply, a car to be seen in. Our reader Walker spotted this imported 1993 300CE-24 Cabriolet equipped with a 5-speed manual gearbox, one of a handful that were equipped as such. Imported in 2001 and brought up to US specs, it’s available in Richmond, Virginia with just over 100,000 miles on the clock.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Mercedes-Benz 300CE-24 Cabriolet on Craigslist Richmond

10K Friday “80s Classic” Edition: 924 Turbo v. 5000CS Quattro Avant v. Golf Rallye v. 535i v. 300CE

One thing I really love about writing up these 10K posts is a odd combinations pricing allows me to come up with. For today’s post, I decided to do something a little different. Instead of maximizing the budget, I decided to look at it from the perspective of what was a classic 1980s car that you could buy and maintain well under $10,000. Obviously, if you’re willing to shill out much more, there are countless classics you can jump in to turn-key; but under $10,000 means with almost certainty that the car you’ll be getting in to today will be at least in part a bit of a project. Is there anything wrong with that? No, I think there’s an inherent appeal to trying to save and resuscitate a car that was in part neglected or just needs attention. Certainly I’ve tried to do that several times with 1980s cars – with mixed results. Today, I grabbed one classic from the 1980s (give or take, we’ll see…) from each of the major manufacturers – which is the one you’d like to save?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Porsche 924 Turbo on eBay