1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

A few weeks ago I checked out a 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 that needed some work — a lot of work. Almost every surface of that poor M100-powered W109 needed some kind of attention. The paint was a baked mess, the interior was growing mold at an alarming rate and the mentioned M100 engine was a total unknown if it could actually run or not. Despite all of this, the seller was asking a hefty $14,500 for the privilege of dealing with that literal mess. Today’s car is another 1969 6.3 — although this one is the total opposite of that charity case. But as you might have guessed, this one isn’t going to cost you $14,500. Not even close.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

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Roll the Dice? 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

Earlier this week I check out a handsome 1973 Mercedes-Benz 280SE 4.5 that looked to be a great driver and probably not a bad buy for the long run. Today, we have another W109 that has a little bit more risk attached to it. This of course is the king W109, the 300SEL 6.3. I’ve covered these many times before and every time I see one pop up for sale I always try to take a look at them. Unfortunately, this 6.3 needs a lot of help and even more money to make it worth it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

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1990 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL

Buying a high mileage car can be a bit scary, even if it’s a Mercedes with a reputation for longevity. Odometer readings can have a profound psychological effect on our perception of a car’s health (and worth), making people leery of high mileage cars. But in truth, at a certain stage in a car’s life, maintenance history and upkeep become far more important than any number on the dash. This is particularly true of the W126. A low mileage car that has been sitting is liable to cause you more problems than a high mileage one that has been driven and cared for by a meticulous owner. The upshot is that if you shop around and choose wisely, you can score a bargain on a high mileage car. This 300SEL, for example, has 286k miles on the odometer and a cheap price tag attached. Offered for sale by a knowledgeable and friendly Benzworld contributor, it offers a budget friendly entry point into W126 ownership backed up by plenty of maintenance history.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL on Benzworld

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1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

Earlier this week I looked at a 1972 280SE 4.5 for an asking price of around $25,000. I explained that for my money, I’m probably skipping the 4.5 and finding a decent 300SEL 6.3. Well lo and behold, a 1969 6.3 in Colorado just happened to pop up for sale bid on eBay. It’s no means as nice as the 280SE 4.5, but this monster W109 is a little more special than the standard 6.3.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

Year: 1969
Model: 300SEL 6.3
Engine: 6.3 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 119,135 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

This is a carefully restored car head-to-toe, but it’s also a 47 year-old car. Runs great and I kept this car up hoping to keep it for a lifetime—but the mechanics are very specialized on a car like this, so please make sure that you know what you’re getting into.

For sale is a 1969 Mercedes that I bought this car in 2008 and restored, hoping to keep it forever. Have moved the family from Denver to San Francisco—my loss is your gain. This is a beautiful car, having had a full strip-down & repaint, all new leather interior, carpet and killer custom installation of a stereo and woofer system—installed in a way that doesn’t cut into the door panels or take away from the car’s originality.

Mechanically, this car has been almost entirely redone. The engine went out almost immediately after I bought it, so I found another one that was represented as being freshly rebuilt and then stored for some time. It’s not a “matching” engine and chassis but it’s a legitimate 6.3 motor that’s in fantastic shape. We couldn’t verify how many miles but it was represented as being basically new, and it has been very strong. To make sure the car would run as well as it could, I put on as many new and rebuilt parts as I could, many sourced from Star Motors in Albany. These rebuilt parts include:

Wholly rebuilt mechanical fuel pump;
Updated electronic ignition system;
New updated A/C compressor;
All new rubber and valves for the air suspension.

Every year I’d do something new. For example, these cars also tend to have a quirk with the rear axle that makes a jitter, and we replaced and repacked all of that as well as new tires, etc. Another example: the back seats did not come stock with shoulder-mounted seatbelts in that year. I wanted shoulder mounts for my children and had those installed. All of the base work (motor, paint, suspension) done in 2008 to 2010 so there’s been some wear since then, but the car is in good shape. Keep in mind that this is a 47 year old car so has various things with it—this isn’t showroom—but it’s very nice. Some warts include scratches on the paint that aren’t visible in the pictures, etc.

The car is in Colorado, I’m in California. A friend has the car in Denver and can show it to anyone that’s interested.

Mileage: the odometer shows 119,135. It’s a 5 digit ODO so my assumption is that it is 119,135 total. When I bought the car in 2008, the odometer was 18,161, so I put less than 1,000 miles on the rebuilt mechanics and paint. I averaged a very little 150 miles per year, usually an occasionally Sunday outing.

All mechanical work was done by Mark Yoakum of German Motors in Lakewood. The repaint was done by Applewood Auto Body in Golden, and the custom stereo installation was done by Car Toys in Denver.

Car is being offered as-is.

Good luck with your bidding, and thank you for your consideration.

After trying to wrap my head around the seller calling this car “carefully restored”, something still seemed off to me. The absence of headrests on the front seats threw up some flags and it wasn’t until I noticed the lack of the corner markers as well as the missing two light housings around the license plate that I realized this isn’t a North American spec car.  Other than the high risk of whiplash if you are ever in an accident with this thing, it also means you got the 9:1 compression M100 engine instead of the 8:1 that the North American cars got. You also got a different injection pump because the North American pumps had a double solenoid to accommodate the problems caused by US pollution standards. How much extra power does this translate to? I have no idea. Mercedes-Benz said these cars have around 300 horsepower and the torque is a whopping 434 lb.ft which was incredible for a four door sedan in 1969. Ultimately it wasn’t important to the company how much power the M100 produced and buyers didn’t seem to care about the exact figures either. This car also has what you could call a “sport” steering wheel that may look familiar from the 300SEL AMG 6.8. On a sour note, those hastily mounted center speakers look ridiculous and to add insult to injury I think they are mounted uneven.

I’m curious to see where this car ends up at auctions end. It’s not an original unmolested 6.3 and has almost 120,000 miles as well. If I had to guess, the $20,000 mark might happen but the lack of concrete information on the car will probably scare away any casual bidders. Ideally, you’d want to give this seller a call and discuss it in length because he is either unaware of everything going on with this car or just didn’t bother to say anything.

– Andrew

Hammertime Updates

Interesting and diverse additions to our Hammertime value guide for this week include some head scratchers, some values and some breathtaking numbers. Leading the charge was the recent sale of the 2016 911R at RM Auctions at nearly $550,000. Yet there was value to be found in the Volkswagen world, as two VR6 modded VW hatches hit $5,200 (1977) and $10,600 (1991). The salvage title Corrado SLC VR6 was presumably cheap at only $3,601, making for a good driver candidate. Bidders failed to show up for the 2003 RS6, and the no reserve auction fell silent at only $8,000 – perhaps a great value, while the 300SEL 4.5 nearly tripped $5,000 despite major concerns. At the higher end of the collector market for each was the W126 560SEL at $21,000 and the B2 Audi 4000S quattro at nearly $8,000. Finally, a 912 tipped the scales at $28,100, leaving us wondering where the 912 market is heading.

Link to the page HERE!

2016 Porsche 911R – E.515,200 ($547,521)
1977 Volkswagen Rabbit VR6 24V – $5,200
1989 Mercedes-Benz 560SEL – $21,000
2003 Audi RS6 – $8,000
1972 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 4.5 – $4,950
1968 Porsche 912 Targa – $28,100
1993 Volkswagen Corrado SLC – $3,601
1985 Audi 4000S quattro – $7,999
1991 Volkswagen GTi 3.2 VR6 – $10,600

1972 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 4.5

Keeping with the theme of Mercedes-Benz in a color I rarely see, I present to you a 300SEL 4.5 in the same color as the bonkers SL65 AMG RENNtech — yellow. I must admit I’ve never seen a W108 or W109 in yellow so I was a excited to come across this one for sale in Ohio, even though I don’t particularly love yellow. Much to my dismay, this 300SEL has probably seen its last ride.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 4.5 on eBay

Year: 1972
Model: 300SEL 4.5
Engine: 4.5 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 77,053 mi
Price: Reserve auction

 Chassis# 10905712001693

Engine# 11798112001703

Paint Code: 624G       Yellow

 A 1972 Mercedes 300SEL 4.5 liter, Yellow with Brown interior, A/C. Just came out of a long term ownership. Matching numbers car. The car has been off the road for many years undriven. A very straight and honest body. The chrome is in very good condition.  Besides rust holes on the passenger side floor, it has a solid undercarriage.

The interior is in good condition and can be used as it is. It is just showing its age. Becker radio.

The engine does not turn over due to sitting.

Comes with all the original owner manuals.

An excellent original car needing work. Rolls and steers fine for transportation purposes.

Please note there is no TITLE for this car, it will be sold on a BILL OF SALE ONLY.

 Any questions welcome.

Please message or call Frank Sajjad at 2166452100.

(We can help to make arrangements for worldwide shipping.)

Shipping cost to Rotterdam or Felixstowe, UK is $1,500

Sadly, I think this car has lived its life. Restoring or even just getting the car drivable would be a task that would outweigh what the car is worth. This W109 has extreme rust issues on the floors and some of the structural suspension parts don’t look too sturdy either. The motor won’t turn over, the glass is cracked and I’m pretty sure it doesn’t stop either. Just to top it off, the car doesn’t come with a title so depending on your state you’d have some legwork to do. I generally sway towards not parting cars out that can be saved with a moderate amount of effort, but the prices of W109 parts make this one an easy choice for the buyer.

I’m curious to see where the bidding ends with this one. W109 prices have been on the steady rise regardless of engine size so I’m not too surprised the bidding is already at a few thousand dollars but if it starts to hear north of $5,000 I’ll be really scratching my head.

– Andrew

1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

You might of heard the story of the Colorado man who had a little affinity for Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3s. (You can read the story here if not.) I understand where this man was coming from because if you really like something, go get four more of them. In his case, the M100 powered W109 just happened to do it for him and I don’t blame him one bit. Now that all five of these 6.3s have been saved and rejuvenated, one of them is up for adoption. Unfortunately, though, the adoption fee is quite steep.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on Hemmings

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Roll the Dice? 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

Every time I see a car that is usually expensive, selling for a price that is inexplicably inexpensive, the gears in my head start turning. Could I buy this one on the cheap, fix it up and perhaps not lose money on it? Better yet – could I buy it, not do a thing, let it sit and probably not lose money on it? Thank goodness I physically can’t fit another vehicle in my garages and driveway because when I see cars like today’s, those damn gears start moving.

The W109 300SEL 6.3 has quickly become a collector car that everyone in the Mercedes circles are rushing to snag up. Prices have been going up at an alarming rate thanks to folks like Jay Leno proclaiming his love for it.  I understand where he’s coming from because the 6.3, in my opinion, is one of the finest sedans Mercedes has ever made. It’s also generally considered one of the first “super sedans” – the prototype for not only later AMG models, but cars like the M5. Sticking the M100 V8 into the handsome W109 body and building it to a standard of above average durability and reliability made this car a winner the day it left the factory. The only problem was all the greatness is that it costs a lot of money upfront and even more to maintain at a reasonable level. This is where some solid math skills and judging your mechanical ability come into play when deciding whether to take the plunge on a project like this 1969 6.3 up for bid in Eastern, Pennsylvania.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

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1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

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There is a reason why Jay Leno calls the W109 6.3 his favorite Mercedes-Benz. It’s a classic Mercedes design both inside and out then finished off with the M100 6.3 liter V8 that still holds it own with modern cars. It’s what a Mercedes-Benz should be. Don’t get me wrong, I love the new super AMG cars that have 650 horsepower and can drive themselves down the road, but you can get that from any brand now. In 1969, this was the car if you wanted a European super sedan. Not to mention you paid for it too at over $14,000, which was only a few thousand less than a Rolls-Royce Silver Shadow. But the Silver Shadow didn’t compare to the 6.3 in terms of power, build quality and reliability. That’s why this car still has a huge following and even higher demand to this day. So let’s check out this 1969 for sale in Massachusetts.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

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1973 Mercedes-Benz 280SE ‘Red Pig’ Tribute

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The 1971 Mercedes–Benz 300 SEL 6.8 AMG is one of my favorite cars ever. The ‘Red Pig’ entered 1971 24-hour race at Spa as the over-weight underdog. To everyone’s surprise, it finished 1st in it’s class and second overall thanks to the madmen at AMG who took the already impressive M100 engine and pushed it to 428 horsepower and 448 lb-ft. This example for sale in California isn’t the famous Rote Sau, but it is a very nice tribute that will have you yelling ”Sooie!”