1988 Audi 80 quattro

1988 Audi 80 quattro

The Audi 80 quattro was a great replacement for the 4000 quattro in many ways. And, in many ways, it was a complete let down. It was more quiet with better interior materials and better technology. It also had more power with the 2.3 liter inline-5, but additional sound deadening and more technology all meant more weight, so the new 80 quattro felt slower than the 4000 had. That technology meant it wasn’t quite as “cool” as the 4000 had been, either – you could only lock one differential thanks to a new center Torsen unit, and then at 15 m.p.h. the rear diff would unlock electronically. BOOOO, Audi, BOOOO! How am I supposed to channel Hannu Mikkola if your electronic nannies are undoing my sick slide?

Did it matter that the second generation of quattro was probably better in most conditions for the majority of drivers? Not really. It didn’t matter that fundamentally the 80 was a better car, either. The 80 had three strikes against it before it even went on sale here. First was the price; at around $24,000 out the door with a few options, it was considerably more expensive than even the expensive 4000 quattro had been. Second was that it was no longer top fiddle; the 90 quattro was the upscale model, meaning that if you wanted body-color bumpers, for example, you needed to pony up even more for the “nicer” model. Heck the 4000 had body-color bumpers in 1985 for less money. What was Audi thinking? And to top it off, there was the whole 60 minutes fiasco.

Those factors combined to doom the B3 here, no matter how good it was. In 1988, with the release of a fresh model, Audi barely managed to outsell the antiquated 4000 quattro. The 80 and 90 quattro combined to sell just 94 more examples than the 1987 4000CS quattro had (3,023 v.…

1992 Audi 80 quattro

1992 Audi 80 quattro

Just a few weeks ago, I spent a fair amount of time documenting the substantial changes to Audi’s small chassis lineup which accompanied the launch of new nomenclature in the B3 80/90 twins. But while early models like the 1988 90 quattro I wrote up for that article were mechanically identical to the “entry level” 80, changes were on the horizon. In 1990, the 7A-motored, dual-overhead cam 90 quattro 20V and Coupe Quattro replaced the 10V NG powered 90s, which were no longer available in the U.S. market. To accompany their upgraded 165 horsepower mill, the 90s featured an optional sport package which included 15″ Speedline wheels and upgraded brakes (standard, albeit in slightly different offset, on the Coupe).

Soldiering on with the 130 horsepower NG and slightly less flair was the 80. In fact, the 80 outlived the 20V motor in the U.S. into 1992, and was ultimately the last small chassis offering the 5-cylinder until the recent reintroduction in transverse layout in the MQB platform. While power and running gear was unchanged, the 80 received some of the 90’s signature bits from earlier on, including the BBS alloys and painted bumper covers. Like all B3 quattros, they’re exceedingly rare to come across; in the case of the 1992 80 quattro like the one here, a scant 640 made their way to our market.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi 80 quattro on eBay

1988 Audi 80 quattro

1988 Audi 80 quattro

While the move from the B2 to B3 chassis brought many changes to the small Audi lineup, it was also very much a case of ‘meet the new boss, same as the old boss’. Some of the features of the 4000 were gone; you could no longer opt to lock the center differential, for example, since the manual locker had been replaced by a more sophisticated Torsen unit. You could still opt to engage a rear differential lock, but electronics overrode that at 15 m.p.h.. That change was indicative of movement in the marketplace and where the B3 was aimed – slightly more upscale from the B2. Interior quality was greater, and production was broken into two categories as it had been in Europe. Selecting the top-range 90 quattro got you nicer BBS wheels, color matched bumpers and mirrors, a sportier raised spoiler, a better leather interior and wood trim. The downscale 80 would channel more of the outgoing 4000, with savory Serret Velour and a more plastic-heavy interior. They even opted to keep the same Ronal R8 wheels as the old model early on, and the subtle rear spoiler was a near copy of the B2. The more basic 80 was closer in performance to the 4000, too – the luxury and safety items of the B3 meant more weight, and the 90 tipped the scales at nearly 3,000 lbs. Mechanically identical, the 80 quattro was about a hundred pounds lighter and anyone who has driven 80s normally aspirated Audis knows that 100 lbs. makes a difference in performance. Motivation for both was the same NG-code inline-5 that was seen in the last Coupe GT Special Build models, meaning 130 horsepower and 140 lb.ft of torque – smoothly adequate, but certainly never overwhelming. As with the 1988 5000S I looked at the other day, these models came to market at a time of crisis for Audi, and consequently few were sold.…

1995 Audi RS2 Avant

1995 Audi RS2 Avant

Having visited Finland earlier this year for the first time, I was struck by one characteristic that all Finns seem to share. The racing driver gene. Every person I was in the car with in Finland was aggressive on the throttle but were very quick and calculating in traffic. These people mean business. Not surprising then the drivers’ exam is a bit more stringent than what we are used to stateside. To get a drivers’ license in Finland, you must pass both a summer and winter driving test. This is a great idea which should be universal. Once licensed, what should the Finn who wants to drive fast in all conditions opt for? How about this rare red rocket? The Audi RS2 Avant. This RS2 Avant for sale in Helsinki is the perfect runabout for the speed freak who needs a bit of space for family or recreational activities.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Audi RS2 Avant on Classic Driver

1992 Audi 80 quattro

1992 Audi 80 quattro

For U.S. customers, 1992 rather quietly signaled the end of an era for fans of the small chassis. Starting in the early 1980s, Audi had offered their offbeat 5-cylinder motor in models like the 4000 5+5 and Coupe models, but it was really the rally success of the Quattro that put the 5-pot on the map. But the turbocharged variant was quiet expensive, so fans of Audi’s WRC campaign rejoiced in 1984 when the all-wheel drive platform became much more affordable in 4000 quattro form. In Europe, there were several variants and power plants available in 80 and 90 form, but U.S. customers only got the relatively high-spec 4000S/CS quattro. Audi revised the model lineup with the B3 model run, introducing the lower-spec 80 and the more luxurious (and later, more powerful) 90. When the 90 went to the DOHC 7A 20V inline-5, the 80 remained with the 10V 2.3 liter NG which had first appeared in the Special Build Coupe GT model. Though not hugely powerful and feeling slightly overwhelmed by the 80 quattro’s mass, it was a very smooth and fun to drive package capable of huge odometer readings. The package remained available until 1992, when life of the 80 ended in the U.S. as it was not upgraded to B4 specification. As with all Audis from the period, it sold in small numbers: Audi reported only 640 sold in 1992, with not many more sold in the years before it. As the book closed on the inline-5 with a whimper rather than a bang, it’s relatively infrequent to spot one of these late 80s:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi 80 quattro on eBay

1986 Audi 80 Sport

1986 Audi 80 Sport

It’s easy to get lost in the world of cars that didn’t come to the United States. Enthusiasts in the U.S. swoon over supermodels that never came here; the M5 Touring(s), the Rallye Golf and Audi RS2 name just a few of the many high performance headliners that seem to pop up nearly daily as examples of the arbitrary rules that dictate what comes in to the U.S. market. However, what always tickles me is seeing the lesser known models, and amongst Audi and Volkswagen products there are a plethora of models that are relatively unknown to U.S. enthusiasts. In part, that’s because the U.S. model range did not always mimic what was for sale in Europe – not only in name, but at some points in chassis as well. The Audi B2 is an excellent example of this – to U.S. fans, for example, say “Coupe Quattro” when referring to the B2 chassis and immediately lesser versed individuals will assert that it never existed without a turbo and flares. Of course, they’re wrong – but there were many other models that we didn’t get from the small Audi lineup as well.

In Europe, 1986 was the last year of the B2 Audi 80 sedan – in 1987, it was replaced by the all-new B3 which wouldn’t be seen in the U.S. until 1988. As with U.S. models, the B2 was refreshed in late 1984 with new and more aerodynamic body bits such as headlights and bumpers. Visually, the differences between U.S. and European bumpers – for most of the lineup – was gone at that point. True, underneath there were differences; European cars received integrated fog lights where U.S. cars had blinkers (and the blinkers moved to the reflector blank area for U.S. cars). Now, I say “for most of the lineup” because there was a model which was really part Type 81 and part Type 85 available to Europeans – the Audi 80 Sport:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Audi 80 Sport on eBay

Winter Winner – 1990 Audi 80 quattro

Winter Winner – 1990 Audi 80 quattro

Every year for the past decade I’ve headed towards the colder climates to enjoy some time exploring the limits of winter driving in schools put on by the Audi Club. Held on frozen lakes or in specific dedicated facilities, these schools allow you to do what’s simply not safe or legal on the regular roads; to get the car out of shape and beyond the limit of grip and learn to get back under control. Predictably every year there’s a crop of the newest and greatest from Audi, Subaru and even BMW. But around the ice, the best performers are still the old ladies; Audi 4000, 80 and 90 quattros comprise a small minority but generally blow right by all the “faster” cars once the grip declines. But while examples of the early quattros are never particularly expensive compared to new cars, finding the right one to buy and turn into a “winter beater” is a bit harder since they’re few and far between. So when this complete and solid but slightly weathered 1990 80 quattro turned up, my thoughts immediately turned towards the ice:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi 80 quattro on eBay

1991 Audi 80 quattro RS2-spec

1991 Audi 80 quattro RS2-spec

In the realm of German cars, Audi seems to be the unappreciated marque when you go back a few generations. But even then, amongst the leper colony of Audi products that no one wants, the Audi 80 quattro is close to King. I say close to King, because truth be told I think there are even less appreciated products from this time – the front drive Audi 100, for example. But go to 1991, and within Audi all enthusiasts are generally interested in is the 200 20V quattro, the Coupe quattro, and occasionally someone will mention the V8 quattro 5-speed. The 80 quattro, though, was one of the smartest options if you wanted a robust, small all-wheel drive sedan. True, the switch from B2 to B3 gained a fair amount of weight and not much more power from the NG 2.3 liter inline-5. It felt, if anything, a bit slower off the line than the 4000 quattro had been – a car not noted for it’s straight line dominance. But its unpopularity ironically made it quite popular as a tuning platform; after all, it does share some DNA with the much loved RS2. In this case, the builder of this car has thoroughly upgraded this B3 to new levels of power and performance:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi 80 quattro on Classic-Audi.co.uk

1984 Audi 80 quattro Widebody

1984 Audi 80 quattro Widebody

You’re not going to buy this car. Let’s be honest, even if you wanted to spend a lot on a wildly modified Audi 4000, it’s on the wrong side of the pond. And then there’s the definition of “a lot” – in this case, the best part of $60,000. Crazy, right? Well, not so fast – arguably, this is one of the most famous and best executed modified Audi 80s in the world. But not only does it look racy; the looks are backed up by a 2.5 20 valve inline-5 turbocharged motor running a host of upgrades through a custom application V8 quattro 6-speed. The result? Going on 800 horsepower! Ridiculous for a standard 80 perhaps, but under the grafted Quattro flares and WRC OZ Rally wheels lie a host of RS2 and Group B works suspension upgrades. Compared to what’s under the hood, if anything the exterior suddenly seems quite sedate:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Audi 80 quattro on Finn.no

1995 Audi RS2 Avant

1995 Audi RS2 Avant

I have a rather simple dream garage. It consists of three cars. My current MINI Cooper S, a 1989 Porsche 911 3.2 Carrera Coupe and this car, an Audi RS2 Avant. Each car serves a different purpose, the MINI being the practical, cheap runabout, the Porsche serving my sports car needs, and the Audi being a bit of a jack of all trades. Sure, there’s a bunch of other cars I’d love to own, but these three are at the core of everything I hold sacred in the automotive world. But amongst those three, the Audi is just something much more. All three cars are fast enough in their own right, but the Audi throws space and all-weather capability into the equation. Sadly, we have another few years to go before these original RS cars are legal in the US, but I can still admire them from afar, like this example for sale in

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Audi RS2 Avant on eBay UK

1979 Audi Fox

1979 Audi Fox

When it rains, so the saying goes. From zero Audi Foxes to two in two weeks, unlike the rare but in need of some work Fox Avant comes this ready to drive Fox sedan. Not often do driver-quality Foxes come up for sale at all, and this one looks great in white over tan. With some later 14″ Audi Coupe alloys fitted, this is a smart looking alternative to a 320i for the Volkswagen or Audi faithful:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Audi Fox on Houston Craigslist

Afternoon Accessories: OZ Racing 17×8 Magnesium wheels

Afternoon Accessories: OZ Racing 17×8 Magnesium wheels

I still remember well the first time I got to hold a magnesium wheel – I was at Lime Rock Park in Connecticut, and a bit of a joking and free-loving owner of a Pantera literally threw one – complete with steam-roller tire – towards me with the tagline “Here, catch!”. Grimacing in the impending pain I was about to experience as this dishwasher-box sized wheel lobbed at me came closer, I reached out and caught it, fearful that I would be on the hook for the wheel’s cost when I dropped it even though this joker wouldn’t be by my hospital bed for the multi-week recovery from my collapsed lungs and broken ribs. To my shock, I caught the wheel, and my tensed muscles experienced nearly no shock. It was comical how light the wheel was; something I wouldn’t experience again until I picked up a Formula One Ferrari wheel years later. Today, there is a set of ultra-rare OZ Racing wheels on Ebay for a very reasonable price:

Year: 1993
Model: Tarmac Rally
Diameter: 17″
Width: 8″
Bolt Pattern: 4×108
Offset: Not Listed
Condition: Used
Tires: Not Included
Price: $1,155 Buy It Now

CLICK FOR DETAILS: OZ Racing Magnesium wheels on eBay

1985 Audi 4000S Quattro

1985 Audi 4000S Quattro

If you were hoping the Audi 4000S we featured last weekend was a Quattro model, your wish has been granted. Here’s another white 1985 Audi 4000S 5-speed, but this time with the all-wheel drive system that made the company famous in the 1980s. This car for sale in California is a two owner vehicle with a mere 52,000 miles on the clock, sure to please Quattro fanatics everywhere.

509

Year: 1985
Model: 4000S Quattro
Engine: 2.2 liter inline-5
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 52,000 miles
Price: No reserve auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Audi 4000S Quattro on eBay

Hey guys,
Actually I would like to sell my Audi 4000 S 1985. Don´t be confused by ebay the eBay title. The Audi 4000s is the US version of the European Audi 80. So the car, that is sold here is the American Audi 4000s.

Some hard facts:
• Brand and model: Audi Quattro 4000s
• Year: 1985
• Mileage: only 52 k
• Color: classical white
• Engine: 5-cylinder with 115 hp @ 5500 rpm
• Rims: original Audi 14′ aluminum rims
• Tires: tires has been changed 1000 miles ago
• VIN: WAUFB0853FA173483

Options:
• 4 wheel drive
• 5 gear stick-shift
• switchable differential lock
• Air conditioner
• power windows
• electrical heated front seats
• electrical adjustable side mirrors
• electrical sliding roof
• electrical healable rear windshield
• AM/FM Stereo
• emergency tire in trunk
• front and back wheel brakes

conditions:
• I am the 2nd owner
• top interior conditions
• old school front seat slips (the seats underneath are in super condition)
• 2 small cracks in windshield but they are stable and don’t get bigger
• bump on left front door (hard to see)
• engine is running perfectly
• non-smoker car
• battery is 6 month old

Its overall condition I would describe for a car of this age is very good and completely original.

Wagon Week: 1995 Audi RS2 Avant

Wagon Week: 1995 Audi RS2 Avant

Often when we come across a car like this, we’re foaming at the mouth to write about how cool it is, how rare it is, and so on. This time around I think I’ll take a different approach, because most of our readership already knows what they’re looking at. So rather than tell everyone what they already know I’m going to take a Letterman approach to this and offer up…

Top 10 Reasons you should not buy this car:

10.  Nogaro Blue is too bright for you.
9.  The acceleration when you hit boost hurts your neck.
8.  You think that wagons are for soccer moms.
7.  You prefer to get stuck in the snow, so quattro is pointless.
6.  You’re a firm believer in speed limits.
5.  That turbo thingy makes too much noise.
4.  The recaro seats are too confining, you prefer to slide around a bit.
3.  Clark Griswolds family truckster is your idea of a dream wagon.
2.  Manual transmissions are way too much work.
1.  You’re currently cross shopping this with a Prius.

Year: 1995
Model: RS2 Avant
Engine: 2.2 liter turbocharged inline five
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 155,256 miles
Price: £11,995 (~$18,184 USD)

1995 Audi RS2 Avant for sale on autotrader.co.uk

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Five doors, manual 6-speed, estate, petrol, 155,256 miles, blue, MOT-10-2013. An outstanding example of these fantastic Audis with a Porsche pedigree. Comprehensive service history, Audi main dealer until 133,000 and specialist thereafter with huge file of invoices and recent timing belt change. Must be viewed. Please call Kenny Dunn for further details 0131 475 9111. £11,995

With all of the reasons not to buy this car, there is only one main reason TO buy it…because it’s awesome. These cars are the future collectables from the Audi stable, second only to the UrQuattros, and SWB Sport Quattros. …

Wagon Week: 1995 Audi RS2 Avant

Wagon Week: 1995 Audi RS2 Avant

With all this talk about fast Audi wagons, where did this mayhem start? Right here. Even though the BMW M5 Touring arrived on the scene first, the Audi RS2 took the idea of a sports wagon and knocked it out of the park. Assembled at the same Porsche factory as the legendary Mercedes W124 500E/E500, this Audi 80 Avant on steroids offered impressive performance, even by today’s standards. With 311 bhp on tap from the 2.2 liter, 20 valve five cylinder turbo engine, acceleration was, to put it mildly, brisk. Top speed was 166 mph and Autocar magazine tested an RS2 and found that 0-30 mph took 1.5 seconds, which bested the McLaren F1. All this power was harnessed by a 6-speed manual transmission and put to the ground via Audi’s renowned Quattro four-wheel drive system.

While sold in relatively few markets, the RS2 has become a cult car around the world and is valued accordingly. This RS2 for sale in Portugal is a Quattro lover’s dream in RS Blue with just over 50,000 miles.

Year: 1995
Model: RS2 Avant
Engine: 2.2 liter turbocharged inline five
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 85,000 km (~ 56,420 miles)
Price: €20,000 (~ $25,966 USD)

1995 Audi RS2 Avant on Anamera

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Car in excellent condition, totally original. It has only 85,000 km, always well maintained, noting that it is a limited edition of 2,200 units, it was born of a partnership between Audi and Porsche, the first version Audi RS.

6-speed manual gearbox
Recaro sports seats
cruise control
climatronic
sunroof

Every day, I sit at my desk at home and longingly gaze at the 1:18 scale model of this very Audi, in this exact color. Of all the cars I wax poetic about here on GCFSB, this is one of my two favorite cars that I could see spending the rest of my life with (the other being a 911 Carrera 3.2).…