2013 Audi TT RS Final Edition

Once in a while, a truly special package comes along and is seemingly gone in the blink of an eye. The TT RS was that package for Audi, marrying the fantastic 8J chassis with the outrageous 2.5 liter turbocharged inline-5 and a 6-speed manual. With 360 horsepower on tap driving all wheels and a sticker price below $60,000, it was Audi’s answer to the BMW 1M, and it was a good one. Though the driving experience perhaps wasn’t as “pure” as the Munich monster, the TT RS was a potent alternative that was on par with the competition, if not better. It was a Porsche killer at a fraction of the price.

But it was short lived, only being available for the 2012 and 2013 model years. On its way out, around 30 of the RSs were handed over to Audi Exclusive. Painted special Nimbus Grey Pearl Effect and optioned with the bi-color leather interior, they were also heavily optioned with the Titanium Exhaust package treatment which came with the titanium exhaust, black optics grill and titanium “Rotor” wheels. A special “RS” shift knob was also present, and the total package (which included the Tech Package, as well) upped the sticker price to over $70,000. Today you can have a basically new one for a seeming steal at some $20,000 less:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2013 Audi TT RS Exclusive on eBay

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2008 Audi TT Roadster 3.2 quattro

VAG’s decisions on who would be able to shift their own gears have always been a bit confusing, but the period of the 3.2 VR6 is really where this came to a head for U.S. customers. In 2004, Volkswagen brought their hottest Golf (finally!) to our market, featuring the singing VR6 in 6-speed manual only form with the R32. Great, but Audi offered the same platform in slinkier TT 3.2 Quattro form. However, fans of manual shifting were overlooked as Audi opted to bring the top TT here only with DSG. This carried over to the A3 model range, where you could get a 3.2 quattro but only with the DSG box. When it came to the next generation, VAG opted to change this formula. As it had been a fan favorite, you’d assume that the R32 would retain the same layout. But no, Volkswagen removed the manual option and the Mk.5 based R32 became DSG-only. So that would hold true in the bigger budget, typically more tech-heavy TT too, right? Wrong, as in the 2nd generation, Audi finally opted to allow buyers to select a manual in either Coupe or Roadster form:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Audi TT Roadster 3.2 quattro on New London Craigslist

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2013 Audi TT RS Final Edition

Did you miss your opportunity to get one of the greats when they were new? Be it the last of the 993s, the 1M, or this car – the Audi TT RS – they’re packages we’re not likely to see again soon if ever. The 8J platform was already great, even in only 2.0T form – but up the power with the 2.5 liter turbocharged inline-5 and this stealthy coupe becomes a monster. Only around 1,300 of these TT RSs were sold between 2012 and 2013 and are already fan favorites. On its way out, though, Audi gave U.S. fans something special with the “Final Edition” cars. Around 30 of the final run of TT RSs were handed over to Audi Exclusive, where they received special interior and exterior treatments. Outside they were painted Nimbus Grey Pearl Effect and given the full Titanium Exhaust package treatment which came with the titanium exhaust, black optics grill and titanium “Rotor” wheels. Inside, they were outfit with two tone Crimson Red and Black leather interiors and a special “RS Plus” shift knob. They were also fully equipped with the Tech package which included navigation and heated front seats. The price for such luxury? Over $70,000 out the door. But today, you can have what is effectively a brand new on for some $20,000 less:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2013 Audi TT RS Final Edition on eBay

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2008 Audi TT 3.2 quattro

An interesting transposition occurred in the fast Golf-based platforms between the Mk.4 and Mk.5 chassis. In the Mk.4, the theoretical top of the heap was the Golf R32 and TT 3.2 quattro – both with 250 horsepower on tap from the rev-happy and sonorous VR6 motor, effectively twins under the skin – except for one significant difference. In the R32, in the U.S. that setup was available only with a manual 6-speed, while Audi opted to offer only the new DSG dual clutch transmission. When it came to the PQ5 revisions, it was expected that this would continue – but VAG threw us a loop, because the R32 suddenly became DSG-only and while that gearbox was available in the TT, you could now opt for a 6-speed manual in the 8J. True, the 3.2 was no longer King of the Hill for Audi, a crown that would later be placed upon the impressively outrageous TT RS. And long term, truth told the TT RS is probably the most collectable of the 8Js, but if you love the TT and you’d like something to tide you over until prices become more reasonable in the used market, it’s worth scouring the internet for a 6-speed manual version of the TT 3.2 quattro:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Audi TT 3.2 quattro on San Diego Craigslist

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2013 Audi TT RS

There are two ways to look at the TT RS. Either it’s a very expensive and over complicated Golf, or it’s a really cheap Porsche. Which camp you fall in to probably relates back to your general feelings about Audi’s engineering and platforms, but the VAG group has done a masterful job of filling nearly every conceivable niche with a specific model which suits the needs of a seemingly minuscule group of buyers. Consider, for just a moment, the number of 911 variants that Porsche offers. Not including color and interior variations (and forget Porsche’s individual program for a second), there are 21 variants of the 911 for sale in the U.S. right now. 21. That’s nuts. But that’s about on par with what Volkswagen has done with the Golf – producing not only the many Golf models, but also the Golf-based Jetta, A3, S3, Q3, Tiguan, Touran, Passat, several European Skodas, Seats, and – of course – the Audi TT. But while there are hot versions of the Golf available in a few different flavors, Audi took the TT RS to the next level, replacing the typical 2.0T motor with a 2.5 liter turbocharged inline-5 that hearkened back to the great 1980s designs. Sure, the motor was now transverse, and you can complain about that all you’d like. But the performance of the TT RS is undeniable – 0-60 in 3.6 seconds (with the DSG box), nearly 1 g on the skidpad and seemingly endless acceleration up to 175 m.p.h. from the 360 horsepower 5-pot. And, all of this was available for around $60,000. You also got a revised exterior with go-faster grills and plenty of special looking accents both inside and out. With only around 1,000 imported, exclusivity was guaranteed and these TT RSs are fan favorites already that are likely to retain a strong value in the marketplace:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2013 Audi TT RS on eBay

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2013 Audi TT RS

There aren’t too many cars that I look at today and think that down the road they’ll be viable used cars. I can look back at the previous tech-heavy generation cars for the trends of what will occur – take the BMW E31 for example. Sure, it’s a really neat looking car, and the lure of the V12 is made even more appealing since you could get a manual transmission. But then there are the horror stories of the 15 or more computers that it takes to run all of the electronic systems, and I wonder how people will keep them running in the future. That’s even more compounded when you look at newer models. For example, about a month ago I took a trip out to Coventry Motorcar and drove their modified CL65 AMG. It was when new, and still is today, an amazing car with every sort of electronic gizmo possible, from heated, cooled and massaging seats to the twin-turbo V12 under the hood. It’s as if Mercedes-Benz took a Brookstone catalog and attached it to a Saturn V rocket. But can you imagine maintaining that car as it creeps towards 120,000 miles? I certainly can’t, and it’s a feeling I have about nearly all new luxury German cars.

There are a few exceptions, even in my favorite brand of Audi. While I’m not a fan of most of the models they’ve come out with recently in general, there are a few special ones that I’d consider owning down the road. It’s not that I don’t like or admire the cars; the performance of the new generation motors is stunning and the interiors and exteriors are, I think, the best in the business. It’s that I just can’t contemplate how you’d keep a new S8 running down the road. Having owned cutting edge, tech heavy Audis in the past, it’s a recipe that I would be concerned with in the future. I might make an exception, though, for a car like the this:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2013 Audi TTRS on eBay

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2012 Audi TT RS

 

If this was my car and I was the kind of person who went in for vanity plates I’d get COPMGNT because that’s what it is. A regular Audi TT isn’t exactly a head turner and the TT S doesn’t demand attention either. Both are fine looking cars but not nearly as fine as the fully hotted up RS version. Yes, I know the differences are subtle but the wider body, 19″ wheels, mesh grille and killer rear valance give the TT body the aggressive look I think it always should have had. Like many of the reviews say, the TT RS is more R8 than TT and I often debate which I’d rather have. I always end up landing on the R8 because gated manual. 

Speaking on manuals, the TT RS we got here in America only came with 3 pedals. Think about that for a second, a modern sports car in America with no automatic option only 3 years ago. If they were smart enough to do it then, why oh why can’t they be smart enough to offer an S3 with a stick now? Sorry to get off topic, sore subject as I’d go in for an S3 with a stick in a heartbeat, but I digress. Audi got a lot of things right with the TT RS, excellent 6spd manual, howling 2.5L inline-5 pushing out 360hp and 343 lb-ft in a 3,312 package. The car was quick, balanced and apparently had minimal understeer for an Audi. I would absolutely love to drive one of these but as they’re actually rather rare, the likelihood of that happening in the near future is slim to none. If you happen to own one of these cars and live in the greater Los Angeles area, please, let me drive your car?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2012 Audi TT RS on eBAY

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2009 Audi TTS

Please give a warm welcome to our newest writer at GCFSB, Andrew Maness. Andrew is active with his own page over at Jalopnik, The Road Less Driven. Welcome Andrew!

Given that I am currently a card carrying member of ACLA (Audi Club Los Angeles) and I am about to put my B7 S4 Avant up for sale, I am frequently asked “well what kind of Audi are you going to get next?”. It’s a bit presumptive on the persons part to assume that just because I’m a club member that I’m going to stick with the brand. True I do have a lot of love for Quattro driven vehicles but since moving to Southern California from Vermont that love has wained a bit over the last 6 years.

I fell in love with Audi because they’re the oddball of the German brands and I like things that are different. These days their vehicles have lost some of that character but I suppose that’s to be expected given how much the brand has grown in the last decade. 2009 marked a turning point for the brand as that’s when they killed off arguably the best body style they ever had (B7 pride!) and dropped their partnership with Recaro. However 2009 wasn’t all bad news as they also offered an S model of the TT coupe for the first time. I’ve always had a soft spot for the TT ever since Tom Cruise spun one off a cliff in MI:2 and the second generation body style is one of my favorite Audi designs. It looks especially good in white but one must resist the urge to “stromtrooper” the vehicle. Black wheels are overrated people, trust me, been there done that. I would however support powder coating the signature TTS gas cap, that’s a tasteful modification.

Click for details: 2009 Audi TTS On Cars.com

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Future Classic: 2013 Audi TT RS

Recently I suggested that the first generation Audi TT was a classic in the making. Judging by the lack of comments, no one agreed with me. So, here’s my second suggestion for a future Audi classic – the return of the turbocharged inline-5 quattro coupe in the TT RS. In terms of performance, the TT RS was a massive step up, bringing the Audi up to Porsche levels of performance. With 335 horsepower, near instant torque and the Group B soundtrack wailing out the rear, these TTs are an impressive package. I got to drive one two years ago on an ice track and when you got it straight and into the loud pedal it was simply a monster – making huge leaps and bounds forward. You really had to plan ahead – one second on the throttle seemed to translate into five seconds on the brakes. If this car doesn’t give you chills when you floor it, nothing will. Coupled with a manual transmission, this package may be one of the last great “analogue” products from Audi:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2013 Audi TTRS on eBay

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2008 Audi TT 3.2 6-speed

A few weeks ago, I wrote up a R32 Showdown in which I came to the conclusion that I didn’t really want either vehicle. I was mad at myself for coming to that place, but it was the reality of the platform. For me, what was missing was the manual option and 4 door option from the Mk.5 chassis car. It’s something that, generally, I associate with not being available on the later cars. Of course, what I was completely missing in that equation was the briefly available second-generation TT, which could be ordered with a 3.2 coupled to a 6-speed manual. For a while, this was the quickest of the Golf-platform cars you could buy. If you’re not into turbocharging and love the VR6 power delivery, these remain a great option to the R32; if anything, slightly more stealthy, much better looking and an impressive package all around:

Year: 2008
Model: TT
Engine: 3.2 liter VR6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: 89,000 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Audi TT 3.2 V6 on eBay

AWESOME 2008 AUDI TT 3.2L COUPE 6-SPEED MANUAL!

I purchased this car new in August of 2007 from Flemington Audi in Flemington, NJ and it is in beautiful condition. It has always been kept in a garage, always filled with name-brand gas, always dealer-serviced and nobody has ever smoked while riding in it. It has never been in an accident of any kind. Its exterior color is “Brilliant Black” with dark grey leather/Alcantara interior. You can pick through the equipment list (see the picture of the window sticker) but here are some highlights:

3.2 liter 250 hp engine, AWD (obviously)

6-speed manual transmission

18” wheels, Michelin Pilot Sport A/S Plus Tires (replaced 20,000 miles ago at 69,192 miles on the Odo) (Lot’s of tread left- see pic).

Bi-Xenon Adaptive (steering) headlights

The car has a build in Bluetooth voice-dial system which works great with my iPhone 4s. It allows me to dial numbers and names by voice command and works really well. The phone conversation sound through the car stereo is excellent.

ESP, ASR, ABS, TPS

LED turn signals, turn signals built into side mirrors

Heated 10-way-motorized sport seats (awesome!)

9-speaker, 140 watt sound (and it does sound very good!)

Auto-dimming mirror, automatic windshield wipers

2+2 seating and fold down rear seats (I have no problem putting skis or my full-size road bike in this car with the front wheel off)

Lot’s of airbags (never needed, thank goodness)

This car came with a really lame “iPod Interface” which I paid $250 for and is basically worthless. I have had a harness installed that plugs into my iPhone and lets me charge and play music, podcasts, etc. through the stereo. I have also designed and built a flexible “stalk” mount to hold my phone, but I’m taking that with me. You get to keep the cable harness for your phone. I will cover the four tiny holes I drilled with four small black screws, so that will look fine.

I have all documentation (including manuals, the window sticker and service records and these will be turned over to you

I’m pretty fussy about all of my stuff, so this car has been kept up pretty meticulously.

I have included pictures of the odometer reading and VIN number.

I have gotten up to 28 mpg on the one or two long highway trips I have taken with this car. Its main use is for daily commuting to work- 30 miles each way- and I usually get about 21 mpg. The original EPA rating was 17/24 (see pic).

Current mileage (as of 11/15/2013) is 88,931 miles. VIN # TRUDD38J681011195

Why am I selling it? Because I am a manual transmission fanatic. If I wait another couple of years before buying my next car, there may be no more manuals left. As it is, I could no longer replace this car with a new manual TT. (The ONLY manuals left in the US Audi line are the base level A4, the R8, and the S4. And yes I am replacing this car with a new S4. You might have noticed that I have become a pretty big Audi fan).

Here’s what works on this car: Everything‼

Here’s what you should know is not perfect:

Yes, I have scuffed the wheels a few times against curbs. I’ve tried hard not to, but you know how that goes. (My wife says it just looks stupid to leave the car 3 feet from the curb). It’s pretty minor- see the wheel pic for a typical scuff.

There is a small ding on the passenger-side door at the crease right below the mirror. If you look closely at the pic, you can see it.

There is some scuffing on the corner of the rear bumper below the crease. I tried to get it in the photo but it really doesn’t show.

There is some minor road rash (white specks) along the front bumper as there would be on any car that is 6 years old

There is some light scuffing damage on the edge of the driver’s side seat leather. This is from me sliding against it every time I get into the car. (see the picture). It probably could be polished back to new by someone who knew what they were doing.

It is due for a routine service (basically just oil-and-filter and a bunch of checking). Factory service was done at Flemington Audi every 10,000 miles per requirements.

Repairs that have been done on this car:

The dealer fixed a minor windshield rattle under warranty
the was a recall/fix involving the fuel tank
a dead audio amp was repaired under warranty
a bad ESP sensor was repaired under warranty
a headlight bulb was replaced
a serpentine drive belt self-destructed and damaged a pulley and tensioner (at 62k miles)
the driver’s side window mechanism was replaced (at 65k miles)
front brake pads and rotors were replaced at 76k miles. I believe brakes were also replaced earlier but I can’t find a record on that.
routine dealer servicing was performed every 10,000 miles up to 75,000 miles

I am a straight-shooter, and you can bid with confidence. I have bought and sold on EBay many times over the years (including a couple of cars) and I have never received any real negative feedback whatsoever. (I once received “negative feedback” for not posting feedback on an item that I bought, but EBay does not allow that kind of nonsense any longer.)

I will require cash or a bank cashier’s check and ID at pickup. I require a deposit of $1,500 by cash, bank cashier’s check, or Paypal within 48 hours after the auction closes. You must pay the balance and pick up the car within 7 days after the auction closes.

The “sunset” pics may be a bit over the top, but I had fun taking them and thought you might enjoy seeing them too!

The TT must be picked up in person in Pennington, NJ. You will have to bring plates to drive it home.

When you come to pick up the car, I will be happy to go with you for a drive on a variety of nearby roads. If this drive shows up any mechanical problems, I will return your deposit and you will be under no obligation to buy the car.

Other than this caveat, however: If you are the winning bidder on this car, you are legally obligated to follow through on the purchase!

MY RESERVE PRICE IS $18,450 ON THIS CAR. I AM NOT WILLING TO TAKE ANY LESS FOR THIS CAR. SURE, IF NOBODY WILL PAY THAT PRICE AFTER ANOTHER LISTING OR TWO, I WILL LOWER THE PRICE, BUT I BELIEVE THIS IS A FAIR PRICE FOR A MANUAL TT IN THIS CONDITION.

If you have any questions, please email me. Good luck on your bidding.

Carl

A few years ago I had a student at a BMW High Performance Driver’s Education that had a second generation TT; in that case, it was a 2.0T front wheel drive. The event was at Lime Rock Park, and the student was doing well and building speed throughout the day. One particularly dangerous corner that catches many drivers out is “West Bend” – a fast sweeper that you can quickly run out of grip and track on. In my track-prepared GT, it’s a max 85 mph curve and that feels pretty scary at that. In my students bone-stock TT, we were approaching the corner at the best part of 90 mph. In my head, I did some quick math, and as I said “brake brake brake” I prepared for the worst; trailing throttle oversteer, and we were going to crash. Quickly I tucked my hands under my legs and hoped as the student turned in to the corner at 90 off-throttle. What happened? Nothing. I felt the car twitch a hair, and the stability management sorted out that we did, in fact, want to come out the other side of the corner, and there it was – the car drove through the corner. It wasn’t pretty, it wasn’t the fast way though, but the car saved us from certain impact. To this day, I’m convinced if we were in any non-stability car we would have hit the wall – hard. That’s how impressive this car is in stock form.

For those who suggested the original TT was too tame or not sporty enough, you haven’t been for a ride in a second generation TT. It’s not a Cayman or a Miata, let’s be clear, but it is simply a great drive. Couple that with one of the best naturally aspirated engines Volkswagen made and a 6-speed manual and that’s a recipe for fun. The second generation TT stepped up a more mature styling, which on these 3.2s is nicely set off by the fantastic looking multi-spoke Speedline made wheels. The price for this fun is listed as $18,500 – not the cheapest of these that I’ve seen, but they’re not exactly common. Still, it’s less money than the asking price on most of the Mk.V R32s I’ve seen, and while the package isn’t quite the same I’d have to say I think I’d choose the TT over the R32, all things being equal. If I’m going to pay $20,000 for a used Golf, I’d really like to feel special; the TT does that, while flying lower on the radar and not grabbing all the boy-racer attention. For me, that’s a win!

-Carter