2016 Porsche 911R

The announcement that the 911R would be making its return was met with plenty of excitement. The iconic R hadn’t been seen since the ’60s and while there have been plenty of cars to wear an RS badge there’s still something about that R by itself that denoted something of importance. In this case, that importance also meant a fairly limited allocation (991 in total) and all were snapped up quite quickly by those who were offered the opportunity of purchasing one. Essentially a GT3 RS with manual transmission and no wing, the R promised to be the understated driver for those who didn’t necessarily prioritize ultimate lap times, but still wanted the most Porsche could offer in naturally aspirated form.

Like many of Porsche’s smaller production track models it didn’t take long for the R to pop up for sale by those hoping to immediately capitalize on its rarity and the difficulty of getting on the short list of initial buyers. Prices were very high and while they have gradually come down they remain very high. With the R the uniqueness of a particular car matters. It matters now and it will matter down the road. If you’re going to spend all of this money on a car that will spend most of its time being looked at rather than being driven, then it needs to have parts to look at that will set it apart.

While it doesn’t have a classic PTS color, this 911R does come with a few stylistic alterations that should accomplish that goal. Do you like orange accents? If not, this isn’t the R for you. If you do, then this one should provide what you need.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche 911R on eBay

1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

I will admit high prices on cars will almost always attract my attention. Or I guess I should say relatively high prices, meaning an obviously high price for that year and model. Those prices stoke my curiosity. I wonder what is so special about them that such an asking price would even be suggested. Unusual colors, interior, very low mileage? Maybe that’s part of the point. Without the very high price I might not take extra notice. After figuring why the price is so high my interest then turns to whether it might actually sell for such a price. That element of curiosity mostly is instructive rather than anything of particular interest, but it can be helpful nonetheless.

That is more or less why we are here and why I’m featuring this Cassis Red Metallic 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe with Burgundy interior. Cassis Red is a very nice color that works well on the 3.2 Carrera’s lines so I likely would have been drawn to this 911 regardless of the price. But the very high asking price caught my eye almost as quickly as the color.

So why such a high price? Because this Carrera has a mere 7,700 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on Classic Driver

2001 Porsche 911 GT2 Clubsport

This GT2 reminds me very much of the Speed Yellow GT3 I featured last year. That GT3 remains one of my favorite cars I have posted here at GCFSB. It doesn’t possess the insane rarity of other models I’ve posted, but perhaps that’s part of its allure. While certainly not inexpensive it actually was attainable. And with 50K miles it also was driveable – in the sense that you don’t have to worry about that extra mileage harming its value.

This Speed Yellow 2001 Porsche 911 GT2, for sale in the Netherlands, with the factory-optioned Clubsport package ups the ante quite a bit in most of those regards. We’re taking a swift step upward in cost, but there’s also a significant upgrade in performance and rarity. That means it isn’t as attainable for most of us as the GT3 might have been. However, for those capable of shopping at these prices I do think it presents an alternative that should be equally as alluring as, if not more so, plenty of other options – some of which might themselves cost significantly more. It’s a simply wonderful machine.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2001 Porsche 911 GT2 Clubsport at Ferdinand’s Classics

1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

I almost feel like I’ve taken a hiatus from classic 911s of late. So I shall return to them with this Guards Red 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, located in Massachusetts, with 46,900 miles on it. We see Guards Red pretty frequently on the 3.2 Carrera, less so on the 964, and then even less on the 993. After that? It almost seems to disappear. We do occasionally see red Porsches still today, especially as a PTS option, but it’s certainly a color that seems much less in style than it once did.

Here in the District we’ve been mired in an interminable cloud of rain with plenty of lightning and wind thrown in for good measure. It has been the sort of rain that doesn’t even allow for the barest hint of the sun’s existence. It has me dreaming of the days when blue sky and bright sunshine will return and that has me thinking about Cabriolets again. In the meantime all we can do is plan and wait and try to stay dry.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

2015 Porsche 911 Carrera S Coupe

It has taken me a while to warm to the 991’s design. I’ve always found it too flat and that’s coming on the heels of the gradual flattening of the 996 and 997. It has sort of a stepped on beetle look. I still prefer the more upright windshield of earlier 911s, but ultimately aerodynamics seems to have won out.

There wasn’t any particular turning point in my perception of the 991; over time I suddenly found myself walking past them and admiring their looks. Simple familiarity I suppose. I wouldn’t say it’s become my favorite 911 design or anything of that sort, but I have finally begun to enjoy the styling. The performance, obviously, always was easy to appreciate as each iteration of the 911 tends to improve in that regard. There’s no particular reason for leading with these thoughts, though I do wonder if others have found themselves feeling similarly.

It does help explain why a 911 like this, which I might have previously ignored, now seems so appealing to me. This is a Sapphire Blue Metallic 2015 Porsche 911 Carrera S Coupe, located in Pennsylvania, with 15,350 miles on it. It has the manual transmission and sport seats. It looks phenomenal!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2015 Porsche 911 Carrera S Coupe on eBay

2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Driving home yesterday I passed a BMW M2 that was stunning. It wasn’t the model itself that caught my eye, but the color. While I’m not as well versed in BMW colors as Porsche, I believe it was Long Beach Blue Metallic. For those like me who are more familiar with Porsche colors, it reminded me a bit of Minerva Blue. If you’re in the market I highly recommend checking it out.

This post isn’t about a BMW though. That BMW reminded me how much I love blue as an exterior color. It had such depth to it and brightness and the way the color shifted as we drove by really was something. I could have spent a lot more time looking, but that probably would have annoyed the people behind me. (Interestingly, coming the other way was a bright blue, non-metallic, Volvo C30. It was nice as well, but not nearly as pretty as the BMW.) I post a wide variety of Porsche colors and I really do like a lot of them, but as a whole I think blue might just be the best.

This seemed a good time to post this car, which I’d seen a couple weeks back and hadn’t gotten around to: here we have an Aqua Blue Metallic 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, located in Miami, with 12,811 miles on it. I’ll say from the start that I don’t think this blue is quite as good as Long Beach Blue, but it’s still quite attractive and among the GT3 RS it’s quite rare. I can’t recall coming across another one.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS on eBay

Birch Green 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

There is a part of me that didn’t want to post this car. There is another part of me that is way too attracted to bright things. I love seeing these colors on the GT3 RS too much simply to pass them by. And this one, dressed in PTS Birch Green, is about as bright and rare as they come.

With Birch Green part of the rarity is linked directly to that brightness; bright cars are one thing and they aren’t for everyone. This is so bright that even those who love bright colors may shy away. The funny part of this one, to me, is that the interior is so subdued. Outside of red gauge faces, it’s pretty standard. At first I didn’t like that, I wanted more color, but as I look at it more I think it might be the way to go. The exterior really screams. A toned down interior may just be the right juxtaposition. (I’d have gone with yellow gauge faces though.)

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Birch Green 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS on eBay

2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Here’s the second of my promised yellow 911s: a Racing Yellow 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS, located in Bahrain, with 4K kilometers on it. This is a case of coming across a 911 that quickly catches my eye and then as I’m looking it over thinking to myself, “I really don’t see many in this color.”

Racing Yellow obviously is a rather eye-catching color on the GT3 RS. Yet, we almost never see it. We almost never see yellow on the GT3 RS in general. Why is that? Granted, yellow Porsches aren’t the most common to begin with so they’re always going to possess a degree of rarity, but given the wide variety of brightly colored examples of the GT3 RS we see I am surprised more of them aren’t yellow. There was the beautiful Signal Yellow example I featured previously, but nothing in this much brighter version and still that’s only one other. There almost certainly are more, but how many?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS on eBay

1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

This is a first. I’ve never seen a 911 like this. The colors, I mean. The typical pairing for a yellow exterior is a black interior. The contrast works well as the two colors accent each other. The combination here is one that most probably would not consider. Here we have a Summer Yellow 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with Mahogany leather interior and 59,003 miles on it.

I have not heard of Summer Yellow. After some searching my guess is that this is Limonengelb (code: M1A), which only was available in ’87 and ’88 for the 911 and 924. Limonen translates to Lime. Generally when we think of limes we think of green, not yellow. Perhaps that’s why it’s called Summer Yellow. Either way it’s a very happy looking color! It might be better suited on a Beetle than a 911, but it’s a bright happy yellow 911 nonetheless. Do I like the pairing with Mahogany? That I’m not sure about. It certainly seems quite earthy and I’d be interested to see it in person. That this is a Cabriolet, i.e. the top also is Mahogany, really is playing up the contrast between these two colors. Ultimately, I think I’d prefer this combination on a Coupe, where the yellow canvases the entire exterior, rather than a Cabriolet. It should be a very rare combination though.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet – Ruf CR4 Conversion

It’s generally safe to say that we all like RUF. Their full builds can be spectacular both in appearance and performance, but almost any RUF to wear the badge, or simply share the name, possesses upgrades that make them very desirable. We very rarely see any related to the 964 so when we do come across one it’s always worthwhile to pause and take a closer look.

This is a 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet that was sent off to RUF for a “full” CR4 conversion perhaps around the year 2000. Like many conversions what exactly is meant by “full” might be a matter of debate, but in this case the engine does appear to have been blueprinted by RUF with horsepower now at 330. That engine likely represents what buyers will care most about. From the documentation it looks like the owners of this car purchased it from RUF in May 2000, but it’s not clear when that means the conversion itself actually occurred. Maybe there is other documentation to support that. It then was imported into the U.S. where it has resided ever since.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet – Ruf CR4 Conversion on eBay