Feature Listing: Venetian Blue 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet M491

Turbo-look Carreras are becoming a regular occurrence around here. That’s good! These are some of our favorite of the classic 911s for their combination of 930 appearance, suspension, and braking, but in a little more refined and less high strung a package. They’re also pretty rare. We like rare.

We especially like rare 911s when they are looking their best and have spent a decent bit of time being driven by the owners who derive so much joy from them. Here all of these facets come together in this Venetian Blue Metallic 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with Champagne interior. As I’ve noted with previous M491 Carrera posts, the later ’87-’89 model years represent a special subset of these cars given that they came with the G50 5-speed transmission and that there are fewer of them since the 930 was now back and available for the US market. For some wide-body top-down cruising, this 911 should provide just the thing you’re seeking.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Venetian Blue 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet M491 on Rennlist

Motorsports Monday: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS NGT

I’ve got a couple of very interesting and rarely seen 964s to start this week. Both, of course, are fairly expensive (well, in one case very expensive) and both showcase models not originally made available in the US market.

We’ll begin with this: a 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS NGT. Any Porsche enthusiast will be familiar with the Carrera RS. Whether you’re familiar with the 964 Carrera RS or not, the model itself is well known and follows the tried and true formula of combining more power with less weight to produce a wonderful performance-oriented 911. Less familiar is the RS NGT, a model that took the weight loss program of the standard RS a few steps further. So while we might think of the Carrera RS as a track-focused 911 you can enjoy on the street, the NGT really is more of a track car. The interior is fully stripped of all comforts (instead of carpets you get plywood floors!) and a full roll cage welded in place. Additional features like a long-range fuel tank, fire extinguisher, and external cut off further separate these cars from your standard RS. 290 were produced.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS NGT on eBay

Viper Green 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

Quite simply this is a holy sh*t car. I can think of no other way to put it. Obviously the GT3 RS itself elicits plenty of similar commentary simply from its sheer performance capabilities. It also looks kind of crazy in the same way most super cars look kind of crazy. Wings, vents, scoops: it’s all flashy and loud and of a singular purpose. As much as I think the appearance of the current GT3 RS has become a bit fussy, it is very much what it purports to be and makes no mistakes about it. If you want those capabilities with a more sleeper appearance, Porsche provides the 911R. If you want things toned down a few degrees, there’s the GT3. When you decide the GT3 RS is your car, you also decide to give up on all pretensions of subtlety.

But what if the standard GT3 RS simply is too tame appearing? Well, then you get this: a paint-to-sample Viper Green 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS with a Black over Lava Orange interior and matching exterior stripes. If you’re having any trouble getting noticed, this should solve that problem. Honestly, it just makes me giggle.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Viper Green 2016 Porsche 911 GT3 RS on Rennlist

1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe – RoW

We’ve seen a decent number of Rest of World 964s come across the market lately. Now that we’ve moved past the 25 year point, that shouldn’t be too surprising given that most of the 964 line fits those parameters and, I think, especially because the Carrera RS now is eligible for import. Almost all have been imported from Japan. Why that is, I’m not really sure (perhaps similar emission equipment makes importation easier?). Also, I’m fairly sure those I have seen all have been the Carrera 2 making this Slate Grey Metallic 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe one of the few exceptions. There is a certain allure that surrounds these cars and I’m not sure if that allure carries over to the Carrera 4 as much as the Carrera 2, but for those looking for the subtle differences from a RoW 964 AND who want all-wheel drive, this one looks like a nice option.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe – RoW on eBay

2005 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe

A couple weeks ago I featured this Speed Yellow 2005 C4S Coupe. It appeared to be an exceptional example of what is a generally unloved model. I stated in that post that I think bright colors really work in the 996’s favor when it comes to maximizing the attractive qualities of its exterior. However, not everyone wants a brightly colored exterior and Speed Yellow is about as bright as they come. Also, as much as I liked that C4S it was very expensive with a price well into good 996TT territory.

Here I hope to remedy those two problems. This is the same model 911, from the same model year right at the end of 996 production, so you get what is for me a better looking 996 and the sort of usability that always has made the C4S a worthy candidate for daily driver duties should that be your desire. Obviously it’s nearly the polar opposite in color. I’ll admit I could do without the tint, especially of the rear lenses, but otherwise where a Speed Yellow 911 will turn every head, this black one should allow you to cruise by (mostly) unnoticed. At 20,086 miles, the mileage is still quite low but it’s priced almost $20K less. That’s a lot of money for Speed Yellow and a few less miles.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2005 Porsche 911 Carrera 4S Coupe on eBay

1969 Porsche 911E Coupe

It’s tough to tell, but this is a Bahama Yellow 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe. When first looking at it I thought that had to be an error. Or, at least, I thought it wasn’t actually painted Bahama Yellow even if that was its original color. The color looks more like Sand Beige (or something along those lines). As I looked more closely, however, it does appear to be the case that it is Bahama Yellow – the pictures taken inside the garage do a better job of showing the color than the outdoor photos. Bahama Yellow is on the darker side of yellow, though it is by no means a dark color, just darker for yellow. It also has a slight brown tint to it, which helps explain why it might look like a darker version of beige when photographed entirely in the shade. I suppose all of this is to say that this 911 actually is quite a bit better than I initially thought and I initially thought it looked really good!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe on eBay

1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

Just beautiful. I can think of no other appropriate way to describe this Iris Blue Metallic 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe. It isn’t perfect, it isn’t entirely original, nor is it an ultra-low-mileage garage queen. It’s just beautiful.

The version of Iris Blue Porsche gave us in the ’80s – note that it did change dramatically when the color came back in the ’90s – is one of those shades of blue that we’ve seen variants of throughout the 911’s history and it always captivates. It exists on the lighter side of the spectrum, which differentiates it from other great metallic blues like Gemini Blue and Minerva Blue, but it makes no sacrifices to its appearance. For those who are a fan of that lighter shade it makes for a very nice option. On a classic 911 it’s a crowd pleaser.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

Double Take: Grand Prix White Carrera Targas – Which 5-speed Will You Have?

If you find yourself desiring a classic 911 from the ’80s you’re immediately presented with a few decisions. The first of which, while seemingly the most straightforward, can actually present the biggest quandary: which model do you get, the 911SC or the 3.2 Carrera? Both are great and their similarities in design and performance are such that either model should fulfill your desires. But let’s say you’re set on the 3.2 Carrera. You want the improved performance and slightly more refined feel. You still have one more decision to make: would you rather find one of the earlier models (1984-1986) utilizing the long-standing 915 5-speed transmission or a later model (1987-1989) with the newer G50 5-speed transmission? It seems a minor detail, but the transmissions do make a difference. Most drivers find the G50 to be the nicer shifting of the two and it is a more stout transmission to begin with, a point that certainly could make a difference 30 years from new. However, the G50 also is heavier and typically the prices for the later Carreras, in part because of that transmission, tend to be higher. If you’re thinking strictly about adding one to a collection the G50 probably is the one to get. For a driver? It’s not so straightforward.

Generally speaking, unless you’re very patient most of these decisions will be made for you since you’re typically best off by buying the best available option from these years. A well sorted 911SC is likely to bring you more joy and fewer headaches than a 3.2 Carrera with some issues. Sometimes, however, the options are such that you really can have your choice and, in fact, in our case here your choice really is distilled down almost completely to the different transmissions.

Here we have two Grand Prix White 3.2 Carrera Targas with pretty similar mileage, pretty similar asking prices, and seemingly very similar condition.…

Viper Green 2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4S

Anyone who has been reading these pages for a while will know that I am a huge fan of the 911 Targa. My first experiences with a Porsche of any kind were in a Targa and I guess that first love has remained with me. I love the aesthetics and the versatility. I even love Porsche’s initial forays into the model’s development with the kind-of-crazy Soft-window Targa. I loved them right up until 1996 when the design was modified for the 993. The Targa basically had become a giant sunroof.

Thankfully that all changed in 2014 when Porsche returned the Targa to its true form. It wasn’t all roses. At its release the Targa was only available as either a 4 or 4S, i.e. no rear-drive Targa, but the Targa was back and it looked great! It fit the design of the 991 well. The new Targa allowed electronics to do all of the work so the top could be removed without too much fuss. You do have to come to a stop though. The horror.

Even with the Targa’s return I have seen very few of them on the road. So I guess the least loved of the 911s will remain that way. Maybe buyers aren’t sure what it is? I doubt anyone would fail to stop and look at this one: a Viper Green 2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4S, located in New York, with 7-speed manual transmission and 6,396 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Viper Green 2017 Porsche 911 Targa 4S on eBay

1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe

I love a red interior. Even the very bright red interiors. Porsche has long made such interiors available to those who like them. I also am a big fan of the 964. Curiously, I’m not sure I’ve ever featured a 964 with a red interior. Well, at least, not a standard 964. I think there have been a couple ultra-rare models, but I won’t count those.

At last I have found one: this Black 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe, located in Los Angeles, with a Matador Red interior and 105,420 miles on it. I don’t think I’ve seen Matador Red before, not knowingly anyway. It looks great with just the right amount of brightness. While it may only be the lighting in these pictures it doesn’t appear quite as bright as some of Porsche’s other offerings like Can-can Red or Lobster. I think for most that likely gives it a nice balance. For those who find a black car to be a bit dull, perhaps this interior will help liven things up. It’s quite beautiful.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe on eBay