1991 Porsche 964 lightweight 3.3 Turbo

You are going to see several Porsche 964s this week as we all went out on a scavenger hunt for a reader/client request and I thought these would be worthy of posting.

My pick for this challenge hails from the United Kingdom. If money was no option you obviously go with the best you can afford. This 1991 964 isn’t the best money can buy, but at a £31,850 ask price it is getting up there. The car holds a resale value well as despite being in the U.K. it is left hand drive. This particular model is a lightweight version ready for track day with a cage, suspension work, and harnesses. It is a 3.3 turbo with 3.8 RS look body.

The vehicle appears to show some use, (is that rust around the engine compartment?), but the seller does not give mileage.

The seller, http://www.seanlockyear.co.uk, looks to specialize in some unique Porsches so I would bet it has been well sorted.  There are plenty of cheaper 964s out there, but I like that the seller describes this one as “Hang on it’ll be a wild ride!” I concur.

http://www.seanlockyear.co.uk/vehicledetails.php?VehicleID=22

~Evan

Superbly restored 1965 Porsche 911

This well cared for, 74,000 mile, Porsche received engine and transmission overhaul work back in 1982 and more recently had a full cosmetic restoration. It really looks nice in black with white racing stripes. The owner says that the car has a custom exhaust and new radio amongst some upgrades. The bare metal respray cost $12,000 and there is $50,000 in total receipts. The car sits on 14″ Fuchs.
This is a real nice looker and from the description it sounds like the drive is great as well. It is currently bid up to $22,500, reserve not met, with several days left. The seller offers plenty of opportunity to visit the car in person and seems perfectly legit, but does have low eBay feedback numbers.

~Evan

1972 Porsche 911 934.5 935 Widebody rolling chassis

This is a bit of an oddity. Someone spent a lot of time putting together a race/street 911 widebody, but either ran out of money or got bored before finding it an engine and transmission. Not much more to say, I don’t like seller’s who write their ads in all caps and underlined so I didn’t read much of the description. If you can make it through the visually stupefying description let us know what you think of this. I see it is quite the widebody and comes with 5 points and a roll cage. The opening ask price is $9500, no reserve, buy-it-now is at $25,000 (now way it will sell for that). If you want a project and like bright Dodge Challenger “sublime green” paint take a look at this.

~Evan

2007 Porsche 911 Turbo GMG World Challenge

This Porsche is a straight up streetable race car. Global Motorsports Group Racing builds Porsche Cup cars and ultimate street fighters. Here you have their technology built into a car you can park in your garage or in the race paddock. This model only has 7000 miles and the appropriate brilliant silver paint looks great.
Several things set this apart from a stock Turbo, but unless you were enthusiast you may not notice what is lurking under the bodywork. For starters upgraded turbos, intercooler, and exhaust bump horsepower up to 650, on pump gas no less. Gigantic Brembo brakes and a Moton Club Sport suspension keep the power on the road. One of the coolest upgrades though has to be the sequential manual kit for the transmission so you really can feel like you are on the track even if you are just running an errand. Note the LED gear position indicator mounted on the top of the steering column.
All told the GMG upgrades add $90,000 to the original sticker price of the Porsche. With a $112,500 ask price for this car, which had an original sticker of $128,980 without any upgrades, you’ll be saving some cash.

~Evan

1976 Porsche 911 V8 Custom 993 Turbo Body

Here is an interesting Porsche 911. A 1976 with a 993 turbo body kit and a built 350 Chevy stuffed in the back. Perhaps stuffed is not the right word as it doesn’t do justice to the amount of quality work that appears on this vehicle. Judging from the description the seller seems to be a straight shooter, which I like to see in car listings.
This car has a lot of time and parts put into it. The list of modifications is well done, purposeful, without being over the top. The seller claims there is 243 hours worth of work in the paint and body work alone. With 350+ horsepower and weighing only 2550 pounds it is good thing it has a full cage.
This car does look like serious fun and it will be one of a kind.

Here is the list of equipment:

Body: European 993 Turbo S body kit. Correct details down to the left hand wiper conversion. Need I say more?

Electrical: Early Porsches are not known for electrical engineering excellence. That is why I rewired the whole car with a modern Painless Performance racing fuse block using standard ATC type fuses. Everything is fused and I have even installed a Flaming River cut-off switch. Don’t forget the aircraft style starter switch…nothing but the best.

Interior: The interior was stripped down to bare metal (floor pans were perfect) and then sealed with a truck bed liner. Lightweight custom aircraft grade door panels covered in black leather with “Porsche” embossed. Did I mention the guy who has done interiors for Jay Leno did this interior? Race seats, 5-point harnesses, SCCA roll cage, and RS style pulls is just the start.

Stereo: You should be listening to the glorious sounds of V8 torque behind you. If not, a Sony CD player with auxillary input (think IPOD, or SAT radio) with 280 watts should suffice.

Engine: Race bred Corvette 350 V8 with a healthy cam. Blueprinted, balanced, forged crankshaft & connecting rods, and even painted to match the car. MSD racing ignition system, rev limiter, FlowMaster 40’s, Custom headers, everything Jet Hot coated to the tips in chrome.

Drivetrain: This is what separates the men from the boys. I have a Renegade Hybrids 915 racing 5-speed transmission with the sought after 8:31 ring and pinion. But wait, it gets better… It is a true MAGNESIUM cased tranny with solid Billet inserts and modifications. Only 100 pounds dry! (I know, I shipped it out Fed Ex) The engine is only running 350+ HP and 375+ Torque. This tranny is built to take 450 HP+. Extra tall 1st and 5th gears, 930 bearings, and 930 diff. cover. It has been purpose built from the start with one thing in mind: put the horsies to the pavement! Wevo short shift kit, Redline Fluid and topped off with a chrome Porsche shift knob.

Clutch you ask? Why sure – it is a KEVLAR clutch and custom pressure plate. Why Kevlar? It simply is the best. It takes a long time to break in (500 miles) and must be done carefully. Trust me, after the coin I dropped, it was broken in by the book and you will enjoy my restraint for years to come.

How do you stop such a beast? I was hoping you would ask. I installed a complete Boxer Motorsports racing brake kit. This is often referred to a “Big Red” brake kit. The rotors and pads are actually common racing “Outlaw” and “Hawk” parts – easily sourced, if needed. I also rebuilt the master cylinder and upgraded to stainless steel brake lines. It wouldn’t be complete without the ATE Super Blue racing fluid. I was convince I would need a brake “bias adjuster” to properly set up my car. However, the system was so perfect right out of the box that it was not needed. During the prescribed break-in ritual for the brakes, I performed numerous hard stops, terrified my neighbors, and then returned home to shoot rotor temps with a laser thermometer – 250 degrees. They were not even breaking a sweat. The brakes are simply one of the most gratifying aspects of this car.

Suspension: Since the V8 is actually 50 POUNDS LIGHTER than a 930 turbo motor, I was forced to modify the suspension. The 30mm hollow core racing torsion bars held the car too high. Solution = more racing components. Each corner of the car is fully adjustable. It is currently set at 20% lower than European ride height. Did I mention the car only weighs 2550 pounds? It has the power to weight ratio of a rocket. All new polygraphite bushings, tie rods, ball joints, front strut brace, bump steer kit as well as any other component that can be replaced. The Porsche dealer then spent SIX hours aligning the car to my specs – and I was there the whole time. The car handles absolutely fantastic with instant feedback. Want to hang the tail out – no problem. Flip the car around a corner – yes. It stays flat, level, and begs for more. You will become a better driver just by testing this car.

Wheels & Tires: The wheels and tires you see are BRAND NEW with ZERO miles. I had some comments on my old wheels (see video link). To show everyone that this is truly a “no holds barred, cost no object project” I bought all new 19″ rims AND tires. They are mounted, balanced, and FILLED WITH NITROGEN. The STICKERS ARE STILL ON THEM…for now. I may take the car out and put a few miles on them. However, I have averaged less than 500 miles a year, so don’t expect many miles, if any.

Protection: Ah yes, you want to come back to the car where you parked it. No worries here – there is a fully functioning FM remote paging alarm with a ridiculous range and a full vehicle display.

The seller even includes a video of the car so you can hear it fire up. The idle is pretty lumpy you can tell it has a hot cam.

The seller is looking for $45,000 plus, and I find this hilarious, a 12 pack of Rolling Rock “to help drown my sorrows when you peel out of my driveway and I never see her again!”

~Evan

1974 Carrera RS for sale in Sacramento

1974 Carrera RS for sale in Sacramento

Yesterday we looked at 1974 914 with the 911SC 3.0 motor in it. Today, we look at a 1974 911 with the 911SC 3.0 motor in it. Despite the same year and motor swap, this 911 RS strikes a completely different chord than the 914. The 914 was a mellow monster, with its unique shape and clean but subtle black theme. This 911 is about as loud as you can get. Velocity Yellow paint, 930 turbo flares, ducktail spoiler, and late-model Turbo Twist wheels scream that this is fast, mean, and unmistakably Porsche.

I prefer the black Fuchs and the long exhaust pipes seem like they’ll break off on a steep driveway, but this is a gorgeous car.  It’s obviously not a real RS (my 70s 911 variant knowledge is a work in progress so please feel free to help me out in the comments), but it’s a great conversion that looks the part inside and out and I’m sure is a blast to drive.

-NR

1984 Porsche 911 Targa DP For Sale in Portland, Oregon

Here’s your chance to get your hands on a Porsche modified with period correct pieces from DP Motorsports. I spotted this Porsche 911 Targa on Portland, Craigslist ($20500, 85k original miles):

1984 Porsche 911 Targa Carrera DP For Sale

quote from Craigslist ad:

This is a beautiful white 911. Not your regular 911. Besides being a European Model it has all the bells and whistles. Approximently 300hp. Origional BB Rims. New low profile tires.
Race clutch, Dual stainless steele exhaust. Whale tale. 964 cams. Same as the Turbo. 930 body with wider steele fenders. Just put in a New starter and Battery. Car is Garaged
and not driven much. 85,000 origonal miles. Engine had a total rebuild at 62K. Origonally purchase in 1984 for 50k which includes the shipping. The origonal owner wanted the
turbo look but not the turbo during that era because the Turbo’s had allot of engine problems. Ordered the car from Porsche but made Body Modifications at DP Motor Sports in Germany.
before having it shipped to Seattle. Never wrecked and is in excellent condition. Must see and drive to appreciate. Have all the Paperwork on this car to verify. Thanks

This isn’t the first time we’ve posted a DP modified 911, but this one is a bit more attainable at only $20k. And 85k original miles would be good for a regular run-of-the-mill 84 Carrera, let alone a gray market spec car with DP goodies and BB wheels! I like it and the price seems about right too. Hope it finds a good home!

dc

Mid-Year Madness – 1974 911 Carrera

It’s been said recently that the mid-year 911s (1974-77) will be the next generation of Porsche’s venerable air-cooled masterpiece to really take off in value.  By the look of things this very attractive 1974 Carrera is leading the charge!

1974 Porsche 911 Carrera For Sale

Model year 1974 rang in many changes for the 911, some well-received, some not so much.  The so-called “impact bumper” made its first appearance that year, replacing the more delicate chrome bumpers worn by all previous 911s.  Conformity with US crash impact standards required the beefier bumpers, but Porsche master stylist Tony Lapine designed an elegant and attractive solution.  Out back, engine capacity was increased from 2.4l to 2.7l in three levels of tune – base 911 with 150bhp and 173lbs/ft torque, 911S (175bhp/174 lbs/ft) and Carrera (210bhp).  Unfortunately for Americans the Carrera powerplant (from the famous 1973 Carrera RS) was still not approved for US emissions standards so US Carreras sported the “S” engine.

The car on auction is a “Carrera” albeit with some tasty upgrades, most notably the very desirable sports seats.  The transmission is the usual 5-speed, with lower ratios.  This may be good or bad, depending on your proposed use for the car.  Maybe not so great for highway cruising, but nice around town and at the track with added low-end grunt.  This car looks great in Grand Prix White with the buerzel (ducktail) spoiler and Ruf-style front valance.  The only thing I’m not feeling is the wheels – they need black centers pronto.

Seller reports he is a long-term (15 years) owner of the car, and that various upgrades have been performed.  The most important of these addresses the infamous “camchain tensioner” issue.  While the standard upgrade is to change to “Carrera” (i.e. 1984 model year) tensioners, the seller states that the tensioners have been “rebuilt”… further querying required on this.  Also, what’s up with the speaker enclosure on the back deck combined with radio delete??

Mid-year 911s have long been the poor relations in the collector Porsche family.  While “longhoods” (1964-73.5) and especially short-wheelbase (1964-68) cars have skyrocketed in value of late, the 1974-77 models have lagged.  Whether the reason was their (marginally) poorer performance, slightly increased weight, impact-bumper styling, or poor engine reliablity (especially on 1975-77 “thermal reactor” cars) the middies just haven’t taken off in value.  Recent trends, however, seem to indicate that this may change.  As longhood values grow out of reach for many, the relatively lightweight middies with their narrow-body vintage appeal are becoming more and more attractive, and this demand will drive prices upwards.  The particular car on auction certainly seems to bear out this trend.

-Dallas

1967 Porsche 911S: Guest Post from Dallas

Note: Dallas is a fan of our site and wanted to contribute on occasion. Here is his first guest post. Please say hi in the comments! -dc

This one is described as a ““. For people that know even a little about vintage Porsches, this is like describing a vintage watch as a “Rolex Submariner 5513 5517” – it’s sort of like nonsense. Just as there are “Submariner 5513s” (cool vintage Rolex watches) and “Submariner 5517s” (very cool incredibly valuable only-issued-to-the-Royal-Navy vintage Rolex watches), there is the “1967 Porsche 911 Coupe” (cool vintage car) and “1967 Porsche 911S” (very cool quite rare vintage car). Let me elaborate…

By 1967, Porsche was into the third model year of its seminal 901/911 series of rear-engined sports cars. For model year 1967 the factory introduced the “S” model as the range-topping version, featuring a hotted-up engine boasting 160bhp – 30 more than the base Coupe and Targa. The factory produced just 1,823 “S” coupes and 483 “S” Targas that year. Despite the power boost, some considered that the S models made inferior street drivers as the increased power was made partly at the expense of low-end torque. However, nowadays, S cars are highly sought after, and an original S can bring serious money. Which brings us to the car on auction…

First off, the car looks fantastic. I’d have left off the racing numbers as a matter of taste, but I think the white stripes and “Porsche” script look great against the dark green paintwork. The cosmetics of this car just look super, with nice Fuchs wheels (introduced on the ’67 S) presenting the classic, iconic short-wheelbase 911 look.

Where things get a bit chancy with this example is in the description, and the question of whether the car is a real “S”. With collector Porsches, much of the price premium is based on originality – original engine and equipment in particular, and whether the car was originally built as the variant it is billed as, or converted later as a “clone”. Porsche will even issue, for a fee, a “Certificate of Authenticity” that confirms the original trim level, equipment, and paint colour of a vintage 911. The seller states:

“this car was born as a straight 911 homologated to an “S” back in the 70’s.”

When I queried the seller as to what this actually means (I asked point-blank “does the CoA issued by Porsche list it as an “S”?), the reply was rather unclear. The seller stated in an email that an S engine was installed in 1984 but the auction description states that the “homologation” occurred in the ’70s. It was apparently “born a 911” (i.e. not an “S”) so I would place a caveat on the description accordingly. The fact that an incorrect VIN was quoted in the auction (and not yet corrected) doesn’t help the comfort level. Once the correct VIN is posted, all questions will be answered… a real factory 1967 “S” has an “S” suffix to the VIN.

A hallmark of this seller’s auctions appears to be extensive quotation of “factory history” information on the marque, but it’s unclear how this relates to the car in question. In particular, the seller quotes extensively regarding the special equipment supplied with the “S”, but doesn’t actually confirm that the car for sale (“born a 911 [non-S]”, remember) comes with the special parts.

I give the seller kudos for listing a telephone number for inquiries, and I hope that a prospective buyer will avail himself of the opportunity of speaking to the seller and clarifying these issues. While a minty real “S” might now bring ~$40K+ (notwithstanding the dreamers asking $100K or more), this car should be considered accordingly. I think an enthusiast would do well to acquire a totally-sorted turn-key (and beautiful) ’67 911 Coupe with non-matching engine like this one for ~$20-25K.

**Note that this car is listed for sale at the seller’s website www.myclassiccargarage.com for $42,500.

– Dallas

Custom 1972 Porsche 911T/E/S/RS/SC/ETC.?

This Porsche falls into a similar category as the last Porsche that made it here, uber clean, somewhat modded, and well documented.

The listing provides good information, (some a bit over the top description),  a little history, and plenty of photos. Because of the modifications, this 911 can’t quite figure out whether it is a E, T, S,  RS, or SC, the VIN shows it started life as a US model E series 911T. An easy identifying feature on this car is the ölklappe, oil filler flap, mounted behind the passenger door on the rear fender. This feature only appeared for this one year after too many Porsche drivers were finding their service attendants filling the oil tank with gasoline.

This car was updated in 1989 with a 3.0 180 horsepower SC engine. Presumably the other mods and restoration work like the repaint occurred at the same time.

The car comes with a set of deep lipped Fuchs 6Jx15 alloy rims and European H4 headlights.  It also has a nice combination or original and custom interior bits.

The seller is a bit shady on the actual mileage, only listing that it has covered 5,300 miles since the modifications. Someone who is good enough to write such an elaborate description, really should know better and should have included the actual chassis mileage in the space eBay provides.

The seller does have a binder full of receipts documenting the car’s service history, which is always a nice bonus.

If one was looking for an original 1972 911T, this is not the car, but if you were looking for a vintage 911 that is partially original with a well cared for history and tasteful restoration and modification, this could be the one.

It is listed on a British site for £21,950  or about $35,400.

~Evan