1969 Porsche 911E Coupe

It’s tough to tell, but this is a Bahama Yellow 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe. When first looking at it I thought that had to be an error. Or, at least, I thought it wasn’t actually painted Bahama Yellow even if that was its original color. The color looks more like Sand Beige (or something along those lines). As I looked more closely, however, it does appear to be the case that it is Bahama Yellow – the pictures taken inside the garage do a better job of showing the color than the outdoor photos. Bahama Yellow is on the darker side of yellow, though it is by no means a dark color, just darker for yellow. It also has a slight brown tint to it, which helps explain why it might look like a darker version of beige when photographed entirely in the shade. I suppose all of this is to say that this 911 actually is quite a bit better than I initially thought and I initially thought it looked really good!

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Conda Green 1970 Porsche 911E Coupe

Here we have another lovely rare-colored 911 that we so seldom come across. Truth be told, I strongly would have considered featuring this 911E even if its color was more common because it is such a nice overall example of these early Porsches. That it does wear such a rare color simply adds to the mystique and the allure. This is a Conda Green 1970 Porsche 911E Coupe, located in California, with black interior. The engine has been rebuilt and hasn’t covered too many miles since that work, but overall this 911 has seen plenty of miles (168K) and surely provided its owners immense joy over those years. To find such an interesting example that also has been well used in its life always makes us smile.

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Year: 1970
Model: 911E
Engine: 2.0 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 168,800 mi
Price: $134,990 Buy It Now

1-Family Owned for 27-Years
SoCal Porsche from New
Rare and Great Original Color

ENG# 6201084 (911/01)
TRN# 7105413
Numbers Matching
800 Miles on recent Top End Engine Rebuild
34,000 Miles on Full Engine Rebuild
68,800 Miles on Odometer (168,800 on chassis)
Conda Green (26) on Black Leatherette (11)
5-Speed Manual Transmission (901)
Clean and Clear California title
Straight and Dry Chassis
3-SoCal Owners from New
Original Sales Window Sticker and Maintenance Book
Porsche Certificate of Authenticity
Early S Registry and R Gruppe Member Owned

This 911E was built in December of 1969 and sold new by Estes Zipper Porsche/Audi of Beverly Hills, California on February 18th, 1970. The first owner was a well-recognized music composer of film and radio scores. He kept the car until he passed away in 1989 after sadly loosing his battle with cancer.

1971 Porsche 911E Targa Sportomatic

I’ve been coming across a lot of interesting Sportomatics lately. None will top the one-year-only SWB Soft-window Sportomatic for its combination of cool features. And the beautiful ultra-low-mileage Signal Orange Sportomatic was possessive of an entirely different allure. Those two were, for good reason, very high priced as Sportomatics go. This one, a paint-to-sample Red Metallic 1971 Porsche 911E Targa, is priced more reasonably and even comes with a pretty interesting history having begun its life as an Italian police vehicle.

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Year: 1971
Model: 911E Targa
Engine: 2.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 71,000 mi
Price: Reserve Auction ($62,500 Buy It Now)

1971 Porsche 911E Targa Sportomatic

This vintage 1971 Porsche 911 “E” model has been in my family for 40+ years. Priced to sell. I’m looking for a good owner for the car. Please don’t make any significant bids without contacting me first. Rare opportunity to secure a clean and dry vehicle that is running and well maintained.


This car was originally a police detective vehicle in Italy. Exported to the USA in 1975 where it was purchased by my late father.

This car is in excellent running condition. Starts with ease, idles steady, and sounds beautiful. The Sportomatic transmission shifts like a dream, no grinding, expertly rebuilt two years ago. The motor has excellent acceleration and power and is extremely a joy to drive. The brakes have strong initial bite, no fading, no pulling.

This car features the highly coveted original Recaro Sports seats and rear window wiper, both were considered options off the assembly line.

Original Fuch wheels restored by Harvey Weidman in 2006.

No issues of rust and/or corrosion throughout any area of the vehicle.

The rubber and seals are in excellent condition.

1970 Porsche 911E Targa

This 911 was always bound to attract my attention. It’s a Targa covered in a vibrant shade of blue and it looks in very nice shape; points that immediately serve in its favor for me. It’s also a 911E, which I’ve always liked as a middle ground between the entry-level T and the very sought after 911S. Step inside and what looks like a fairly basic interior suddenly makes me pause. First, this is probably the ugliest steering wheel I’ve ever seen. No big deal really; throw a Prototipo on (or find a period-correct wheel if originality is your concern) and move along. Then I notice there’s no radio. The ad makes no mention of a radio delete. We aren’t presented with the CoA so that doesn’t help. Now I’m intrigued and want to know more. Is this just a matter of a restorer deciding to remove the radio or is there something more to this 911E?

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Year: 1970
Model: 911E Targa
Engine: 2.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 36,646 mi
Price: $119,995 Buy It Now

This is the vintage exotic so many of us long for. A 1970 Porsche 911E Targa offers many of the delicate design touches of the first-generation 911, and then adds power to the package. So when it’s presented in an interesting and correct factory color, this is an open top dream car.

The 911’s shape is legendary, and that’s why there is so much appreciation for a car like this. The narrower bodies, tidy proportions, and elegant simplicity showcase the iconic shape in its purest form. Porsches have always been high-quality machines, and this one continues that tradition today with doors that open and close effortlessly and exacting panel gaps.

Signal Orange 1970 Porsche 911E Coupe Sportomatic with 12,881 miles

I am very intrigued by this 911. The whole of it: the color is one of my favorites. Why is the mileage so incredibly low? And what will it sell for given that it’s a Sportomatic? There’s just a lot going on here and a lot for us to attend to.

So what do we have? A Signal Orange 1970 Porsche 911E Coupe with the 4-speed Sportomatic transmission and a reported 12,881 original miles. We aren’t told whether the paint and interior are also completely original so that might be question 1. After which documentation of the mileage will be paramount. From there we can begin to think about value. But, first, just look at it. It’s so beautiful!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Signal Orange 1970 Porsche 911E Coupe Sportomatic on eBay

1971 Porsche 911E Targa

Here we’re going to look at another imperfect long-hood 911 and compared with yesterday’s 911L the imperfections on this 911E are less noticeable, less urgently in need of repair, but in one case possibly more problematic. But this one is really pretty so I couldn’t let it pass by without further inspection. This is an Irish Green 1971 Porsche 911E Targa, located in California, with a wonderfully contrasted Black interior with Houndstooth seat inserts. The Irish Green over Black combination is said to be its original colors – though in neither case is it the original paint or seating material. We don’t have confirmation of that originality nor do we have confirmation of the originality of the Houndstooth inserts. So while it all comes together very well and looks fantastic inside and out, we’ll have to hope the right verification is available. About that problematic flaw: this 911E currently is fitted with a 901 5-speed transmission, the period-correct desirable choice of most 911 owners, but it’s not the original setup of the car as this was delivered as a Sportomatic.

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1969 Porsche 911E Soft-window Targa – 1 of 12

There are some colors that if you showed me the swatch for it I would never consider it on a car. Then when I actually see it on a car I’m blown away. This color, which I’m fairly sure is Lindgrün and they’ve called Golden Lime Green, fits that bill perfectly. This isn’t the first 911 I’ve seen in this color, but every one I’ve come across has blown me away even though the color itself I would never think I’d enjoy. It’s still probably not for everyone, but I really like it here. And there’s more to this 911E than just the color. It’s one of the rare Soft-window Targas built for the ’69 MY, making it one of the few to possess the longer wheelbase that Porsche introduced for the 911 in 1969. While Porsche had begun soft-window production in 1967 it quickly was replaced by the hard window with which we’re all very familiar. The design is pretty quirky and provides a number of variations of enjoying your open-top driving. By 1969 very few soft windows were being produced and it was now an option rather than a distinct model. This makes coming up with firm production numbers difficult. The seller states that this is 1 of 12 911E in this configuration, a number that appears in an article of Road & Track though I’m not exactly sure from where the number originally was sourced. I’ve seen other numbers quoted in auctions, but all are close to this so we can at least know it’s a rare machine.

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Motorsports Monday: 1971 Porsche 911E

Valuing a Porsche 911E isn’t really that hard, in the grand scheme. The middle child of the 911 lineup, a quick check of Hagerty’s valuation tool has the average value around $78,000 right now, with a high of $144,000 and a low of $52,500 for a “fair” example. While the 911 market has flattened or cooled slightly, they’re still quite valuable cars. Valuing historic race cars can be more difficult, but as vintage racing is currently in vogue right now, they’re many times more expensive than their road-going counterparts if they are properly sorted factory cars. Figures close to a million dollars aren’t unheard of for the right racer. But the most difficult to value are the non-original, modified racers run by privateers. Sometimes they have a very interesting history, such as this ’71 E does:

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1973 Porsche 911E Targa Sportomatic

I have a strange fascination with the Sportomatic and find myself drawn to them as I keep coming across them in interesting colors and options. Not that I don’t see the same with the much more standard manual-transmission equipped 911s of the day, but the Sportomatic almost strikes me as a rare option that I should give attention to and I find myself featuring them. I suppose what confounds me is that I’d likely never consider purchasing one unless I was in a position of having a thorough collection and wanted one for its engineering and place in Porsche’s history. The transmission itself seems like the answer to a question no one was asking at the time, yet was quite prescient in its desirability. It was just way before its time. They are rare. They are also interesting. But are they desirable? Well, they’re definitely less expensive than comparable manual 911s and that probably shouldn’t surprise us. The one we see here, a Gold Metallic 1973 Porsche 911E Targa located in Atlanta, makes for an interesting case as it presents with quite a few cosmetic flaws, but comes in a unique period-correct color and has that aforementioned marvel the Sportomatic.

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1973 Porsche 911E Targa

In many ways this Porsche 911 possesses a lot of what makes me love these cars so much, but which has seemed to be unobtainable as prices for these early cars have elevated. It’s a mix of original spec and modifications, but it doesn’t stray far remaining true to that original design but still possessing some nice upgrades. It’s neither pristine nor a dog. This is all to say that there is just something about the general ethos of this 911 that draws me in. Here we have a Beige Grey 1973 Porsche 911E Targa, located in New York, with, the seller assumes, around 149,000 miles on it. While Beige Grey sounds about as boring as is possible it does actually look very good, and even if it’s not Tangerine or Viper Green – colors that would really attract our notice – it is still a nice alternative and gives this 911 a gritty feel that works well with its overall aesthetic. I even like the contrast of the Minilite wheels at the rear!

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