1969 Porsche 911T Coupe

1969 Porsche 911T Coupe

I’m finding myself strangely drawn to this 911. I say strangely because while it is very pretty – hence the source of my attraction – it is otherwise a fairly standard Red 911. And even though I like red it is not typically the color that most captures my attention. The pictures have, almost without exception, been touched up, which is too bad since it detracts from our ability to fully take in the car but it is typical of this dealer. Regardless, we can still see that this is a nice looking car, in good condition and with a lovely vintage style about it. Here we have a Polo Red 1969 Porsche 911T Coupe, located in Indiana, having traveled a reported 76,977 miles.

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Year: 1969
Model: 911T
Engine: 2.0 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 76,977 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

Superb Matching Numbers, Fully Restored 1969 911 T in Rare Retro Polo Red.
1969 Porsche 911 T 2-Door Coupe

As technology advances and automakers trend toward more advanced technologies, many car enthusiasts are searching to snatch up the older relics of the past, especially those that have been methodically maintained and tenderly restored. For the Porsche lover, the 1969 911 T is just the car to fit the bill, appealing to a hearty passion for engineering and love of the classic Porsche aesthetic. They are harder and harder to come by and will be even more so in years to come as they gradually disappear from the market and into private collections.

This gorgeous long hood body is featured in the fabulously retro original Polo Red, displaying a flawless finish thanks to a superb window-out repaint. Bare bones restoration was completed with all new rubbers and seals at reassembly.

Gulf Blue 1970 Porsche 911T Coupe

Gulf Blue 1970 Porsche 911T Coupe

We come across a wide range of descriptions when looking at ads for cars. Some are so short and vague as to be meaningless. Many follow a stereotypical salesman approach making bold hyperbolic claims about every positive aspect of the car while brushing aside the negatives. And others can be so wordy that the useful details get lost among a sea of model history (i.e. not the car’s history) narrative and general information that might apply to almost every example. There is another type; a better type. This ad is of that sort. It isn’t long, but the details are there. It answers many of the obvious questions and describes the car faithfully. That the seller works the pictures into the narrative actually helps as you can see what is being described. To a certain degree (and this probably is why I like the ad) it provides a lot of the information I would provide when featuring the car here. So read it!

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Year: 1970
Model: 911T
Engine: 2.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 75,550 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

For those of us who have to work for a living, affording the acquisition of a longhood 911 “F-Modell” has become quite a stretch. Especially the 2.2 and 2.4-liter cars of the 1970 to 1973 vintage seem to fit either one of two categories: they are either way too expensive, or rusted hulks in need of e-v-e-r-y-t-h-i-n-g.

Every once in a blue moon do we find a car that is still sensibly priced. It may not be a show winner, but it will have good bones and usually can be enjoyed for years to come just the way it is, thus allowing small improvements at one’s own pace, as time and funds allow.

1973 Porsche 911T Targa

1973 Porsche 911T Targa

Yesterday’s featured 911 was dubbed, by me and the seller, as a very honest 911. In its presentation and overall appearance it conveyed a sense of hiding very little and being shown for exactly what it is. This 911 isn’t really that sort of car. That isn’t to suggest that it’s dishonest, but it is different. For starters it’s much better photographed with some touching up that helps the car stand out more so than we saw with Albert. It also has been fully restored so everything looks pretty much blemish free and with little wear. Where I think all of that leads is this: were I a prospective buyer I would feel a stronger inclination to see this 911 in person, to actually get my hands on it, prior to making any kind of bid than I would with yesterday’s 911. Both present very well, but for entirely different reasons and that leads to some of our differences in evaluation. Getting all of that out of the way, let’s take a look: here we have a Light Yellow 1973 Porsche 911T Targa, located in Oregon, with a contrasting Brown/Charcoal interior and 89,884 miles on it. Per the CoA, the exterior and interior colors are as this 911 left the factory, though not entirely. More on that below.

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1970 Porsche 911T Coupe

1970 Porsche 911T Coupe

I like cars that have names. There tends to be a history attached to them that makes the entire package more interesting. This 1970 Porsche 911T is named Albert because the exterior is painted Albert Blue. Ok, so it isn’t a very original name, but it works. What is original is almost everything else on this 911. The paint from which Albert got its name is not original, though it is said to be the correct color per the CoA. The radio is an updated unit of the original and the seller thinks the dash pad has been replaced, but that can’t be confirmed. The engine and transmission have both been rebuilt, but are matching to the car. So we’re not looking at a 100% as-it-left-the-factory 911, but among early examples in unrestored condition this is one of the better and most original I can recall seeing. The seller describes it as one of the “most honest” he’s seen and that seems a fitting description. This is no garage queen or expertly restored 911 where every nut and crevice gleams. But it presents really well and has had a nice life. Cheers Albert!

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1971 Porsche 911T Targa – Soft-window Conversion

1971 Porsche 911T Targa – Soft-window Conversion

I’ve featured a 911 Soft-window Targa plenty of times before, but this is the first example I can recall seeing where someone converted an original hard window to a soft window. I’m not sure whether this was a popular idea at the time – I’ve definitely heard of owners doing the reverse (converting a soft window to a hard window) – but regardless we have one here. The Soft-window Targa only was produced for a couple of years in the late ’60s. These were an homage to Porsche’s participation in the Targa Florio and perhaps the original owner of this Targa hoped to recreate some of that open-roofed essence with this conversion. It certainly provides a unique appearance, especially with the addition of the Cibie rally lights, and stands out well with its Pastel Blue paint. While not original, this 1971 Porsche 911T Targa should still be quite desirable.

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Tangerine 1971 Porsche 911T Coupe

Tangerine 1971 Porsche 911T Coupe

With my focus so squarely on the 911SC and 3.2 Carrera of late I feel like I’ve missed a couple of nice long-hood 911s. The one we see here, a Tangerine 1971 Porsche 911T Coupe located in Houston, is one such example wearing one of my all-time favorite Porsche colors. We don’t have much in the way of history to help us understand the life it has lead. We do see some receipts from the last decade, which appears to include its restoration work, so we should have some good knowledge of its current state. In its restored state it does look quite good. The asking price is too high (and that certainly goes against my recent focus on value among 911s), but sometimes the allure of the car draws me in enough to set aside price for now.

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1973 Porsche 911T Coupe – REVISIT

1973 Porsche 911T Coupe – REVISIT

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I don’t normally revisit a car this quickly, but since I’ve pretty much decided I love this 911 I’m going to break with protocol. The Aubergine 1973 Porsche 911T Coupe is still for sale and the seller has now made his ask clear rather than wait out a reserve auction. Given that bidding in the previous auction only reached $58,783, asking $100K is a substantial leap. Perhaps the seller simply needs the right buyer to come along. It’s certainly a lot for a 911T, but showcasing one of the best colors from its era certainly helps it.

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The below post originally appeared on our site August 27, 2016:

1973 Porsche 911T Coupe

1973 Porsche 911T Coupe

I was going to open this post with an argument in favor of the color purple. Not the book or movie, but the color as a choice on a car. But I think it’s easier just to allow this 911 to do the work for me. Because I think it’s a wonderful color. Of the various rare colors for an early 911 Aubergine (or eggplant) is an underrated favorite. It isn’t as bright and vibrant as many other choices, but still stands out, especially in the sun when that color comes through all the more. We almost never see purple cars of any sort, but the great thing about Aubergine is that it doesn’t hide the color the way some very dark metallic purples do – colors that look black in almost every lighting – but it’s also not the sort of purple that the Joker might paint his cars. It walks a line between those two extremes and manages to look sophisticated and aggressive at the same time. I love it. Here we have it on what was an entry-level 911 in its day: an Aubergine 1973 Porsche 911T Coupe, located in Belgium, with around 70K miles on it.

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1973 Porsche 911T – RSR build

1973 Porsche 911T – RSR build

I’ll just get this out of the way: properly speaking this 911 isn’t really a RSR build, meaning it hasn’t tried to replicate the mechanicals of those very special cars. What this build has done is take a 911T and completely alter its personality in a way that the RSR did during its time. The description provides a basic overview of the work, but the biggest item, and what I think differentiates this from a lot of the builds we see, is that this 911T now houses a 3.6 liter flat-six from the 964. This quickly distinguishes it from the 3.2 Carrera based builds that are much more common. The pictures aren’t the best for appreciating the metallic grey paint, but the appearance looks quite promising. That this car currently resides in Japan will make things difficult for a lot of buyers, but for those willing to put in the effort this 911 could be a pretty great.

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1970 Porsche 911T

1970 Porsche 911T

I’ve seen this car around a few times and for whatever reason have passed it by. Perhaps I thought it was priced too high; perhaps other cars took precedence. Regardless, I think it deserves some attention and, at the very least, if I did indeed pass it by because of price, then that problem has been solved as it is now up for auction without reserve. The market will decide its fate. This Porsche began life as an entry-level 911T, but has since been transformed into a far more aggressive looking and driving build. The engine is now a built 3.4 liter flat-6. We don’t have much information about the engine other than those details. I’d guess it originally was an early 3.2 liter especially since it remains mated to a 915 5-speed transmission. It is now said to be making 275 hp. That’s a substantial upgrade in power and should transform the entire character of this 911. The aesthetics fit the general ethos of quite a few modified 911s, especially those which have been backdated. The interior is spartan, but purposeful, and the exterior features a widened rear along with wider, fatter, tires to help fill out those fenders. I’d imagine given the extra power, those wider tires will be much appreciated!

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1973 Porsche 911T Coupe Sportomatic

1973 Porsche 911T Coupe Sportomatic

I have a couple reasons for wanting to feature this 911: 1) the exterior color is Gemini Blue Metallic, one of the better early blues that Porsche offered and definitely one of my favorites. 2) It’s a Sportomatic, the quirky clutch-less manual-automatic transmission Porsche experimented with in the early years of the 911. A Sportomatic is pretty rare to come across, though this is one of the times where rarity doesn’t always mean increased desirability. Still, for those with an interest in Porsche’s engineering history, either as part of a collection or simply for one’s own curiosity, this one comes from about as late in long-hood design as we can find and should make for a nice example. It is equipped with the MFI 2.4 liter flat-six that was standard in the 911E and 911S – though with less power – but only available in the first half of ’73 for the 911T. That it comes in such a wonderful color makes it just that much more appealing. So here we have a Gemini Blue Metallic 1973 Porsche 911T Coupe, located in Oregon, with 109,802 miles on it and the 4-speed Sportomatic transmission.

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1972 Porsche 911T Coupe

1972 Porsche 911T Coupe

Classic color combinations manage to find a place in our consciousness where they stay firmly rooted so as to capture our attention at every appearance. Though the combination we see here probably would best be known through the British automobile industry, under the guise of British Racing Green, it still manages to possess the same allure when attached to a German marque. The combination of a non-metallic Green over a Tan interior is one I particularly enjoy and one which we have seen many times over the years. For Porsche, the color of choice in its early days was Irish Green and it looks particularly good here on a long-hood 911. However, classic or not, green Porsches tend to see less demand. That may not necessarily apply as readily to Irish Green since it’s fairly well regarded, but in general fans of a green Porsche can many times get them at a reduced price. The love simply isn’t always there. Whether that will be the case here, we’ll have to see with this Irish Green 1972 Porsche 911T Coupe, located in Connecticut, with 106K miles on it.

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1970 Porsche 911T Targa

1970 Porsche 911T Targa

I’ve featured a good number of early 911s lately, and quite a few Targas in general, but this one might be my favorite. Those who are frequent readers will know why: it’s all about the color. Were this a 911S, rather than the entry-level T, I imagine I wouldn’t be the only one completely captivated by it. We aren’t told the specific color, but my guess would be Pastellblau. It’s one of the early choices in the line that would later include Mexico Blue and Riviera Blue. With this particular example, that wonderful exterior is complemented by a Tan interior. Some may prefer a black interior, but for me the Tan is the perfect contrast. Altogether this is a fantastic early Targa and sure to attract a good deal of attention.

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1971 Porsche 911T Coupe

1971 Porsche 911T Coupe

Pretty much every car we feature at GCFSB has some sort of striking feature that has compelled us to pay more attention to that car over and above the many others for sale. Those sort of interesting features are pretty wide-ranging: rare colors, rare options, rare models, low mileage, or superb condition. There is one other category that occasionally attracts our notice: price. Of course, with price there is always a caveat: there is usually a reason for a low price. However, now and then we come across a car that simply seems to be priced quite well and for that reason alone we take notice since some of those cars make for the most possibilities for our readers. For many, these prices make these cars obtainable and, perhaps just as important, it makes them driveable. This is especially the case with air-cooled 911s as many of the early models have reached pricing that makes it very difficult to really enjoy the car. You’re always worried about depreciation or the idiot who isn’t paying attention ruining your dream car. All of this serves as a long introduction to the car we see here: a Silver over Black 1971 Porsche 911T, located in Charlotte, NC, with 81,000 miles on it. And it has an asking price below $40K. For a long-hood 911 that’s one of the lowest prices we’ve come across for a car that actually appears in pretty standard condition.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 Porsche 911T Coupe on Excellence Magazine

1971 Porsche 911T Coupe

1971 Porsche 911T Coupe

For most of us, the reason we read these pages – or write for them – comes from a certain passion for driving. Some may be in search of interesting cars for a collection, but even collectors began their hobby from that basic foundation of a love of cars. The desire for vintage cars then stems from a nostalgic longing for an idol from our youth, or a driving experience that is more analog, connected, and human. Or just a mixture of all of these things. No matter what the cause we always return to driving itself and vintage cars can raise an impediment: price. There is a price for nostalgia. Limited remaining supply mean that few vintage cars are cheap and all will need, or will have had, extensive work either to keep them in good condition or return them to good condition. For those of us who are fans of the 911, the iconic stature of the car itself raises those costs in every regard and for most the cost becomes prohibitive. But if you must have all the beauty of that original design married to the lightness and simplicity found in most any vintage automobile, then you’ve got to find a way around these problems of cost. The 911 we see here I think offers some nice possibilities, though given that it appears to be in turn-key condition the bidding has come up to a point where we’d hardly consider it inexpensive. Still, it has promise. Here we have a Light Yellow over Black 1971 Porsche 911T Sunroof Coupe, located in Philadelphia, with 80,959 miles on it.

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