Wimbledon Green Metallic 1993 Porsche 928GTS

You can’t really tell it from the pictures, but this actually is a pretty brightly colored 928. We don’t see very many bright colors on the 928 and if the seller of this one is correct in his statement that this is 1 of 2 in this color – with the other one housed in the Porsche factory – then you aren’t likely to see another one any time soon. Either for sale or on the roads.

This is a paint-to-sample Wimbledon Green Metallic 1993 Porsche 928GTS, located in New Jersey, with a 5-speed manual transmission. In case the exterior color and the 5-speed haven’t made it exclusive enough the interior is leather-to-sample Midnight Green with Red piping. I’m not sure these combinations are quite what I’d go for and in that sense perhaps we can understand its rarity, but for those searching for the rarest of the 928s this one must rank right up there.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Wimbledon Green Metallic 1993 Porsche 928GTS on eBay

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1987 Porsche 928S4

Truth be told this wasn’t the 928 I originally intended to post. It was going to be this 928 GTS 5-speed also for sale at Parkhaus. Those obviously are highly sought after cars. But as I continued looking about I then came across this very similar looking 1987 Porsche 928S4 and the price difference simply became too much for me to continue with the GTS. The GTS certainly is quite nice, but for 100 grand less you could have this one. That’s a lot of money saved!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 928S4 on eBay

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Feature Listing: 1978 Porsche 928

Is it possible that the early 928 is an even more futuristic looking car than the later models? Typically we’d probably consider the inverse where a model evolves and advances as it gets older. The 928 surely did advance and its evolution is clear, but I still think the earlier models look farther ahead than the later models. Some of that surely is down to their look relative to other options available at the time, but I think there’s more to it than that. Their spaceshippyness (that’s definitely not a real word) seems more pronounced. The round-in-the-back and pointy-in-the-front design is more apparent. The interior…well as soon as we take a look inside this one I think that part becomes obvious. It all seems like it’s looking farther into the future and then with its evolution Porsche dialed it back some and smoothed all of the rough edges.

This forward looking design is a testament to Porsche’s ideas and it really makes me wish the model had continued to live on so that we could see where it might have gone next. The Panamera isn’t it.

These were my thoughts as I looked over this 928. It comes from early in the model’s production so it showcases those early design cues and its black-white pascha interior is something few marques would ever consider utilizing outside of the ’70s. This is very much a period-correct 928 and its restoration looks top notch.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 928 on 928 Classics

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1983 Porsche 928 S

I focus a lot on the final model in the 928 line, the GTS. For good reason: as the final evolution of the model’s 17 year run the GTS is a very attractive car that brings with it the highest levels of performance and refinement that we covet so dearly in any GT.

However, they also can be very expensive. So for the Grand Tourer on a budget we need simply to turn the clock back a little and look at one of the early 928s. From there prices become much more reasonable. Which brings us to this: a Black 1983 Porsche 928 S, located in Missouri, with an interesting Berber cloth/tan leather interior and 76,161 miles on it. 1983 was the first year of the S for the US market and along with some minor aesthetic evolution it brought with it an increase in displacement from the original 4.5 liter V8 to a 4.7 liter V8. Naturally power was up slightly as well to 234 hp. This one also is equipped with a 5-speed manual.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Porsche 928 S on eBay

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Rosewood Metallic 1982 Porsche 928

The 928 still manages to amaze me. Let’s not be confused, this 1982 Porsche 928 is an old car. But it doesn’t really look old. Or at least not in the way most cars from the ’80s look old. The design clearly was ahead of its time – a point driven home by how similar the design remained over the 928’s 17 years of production – and even today the older versions still look good. It is in the interior where things most quickly begin to date themselves, but on the outside the 928’s curves still look fresh. We certainly won’t confuse it for a current production model, but as I said when we compare it to the various cars of its day it just doesn’t quite show its age to the same degree.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Rosewood Metallic 1982 Porsche 928 on eBay

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1994 Porsche 928 GTS – 5-speed

I said previously that I’d try to pay a little more attention to the Porsche 928 so that’s what I’m trying to do. In truth I’ve featured this 928 before so technically this is a revisit. However, I wanted to shine a brighter light on it than the standard “hey look this one’s back up for sale.” It’s been nearly a year since I featured it and that’s usually long enough to revisit something in depth, but mostly this comes down to price and my own love for the color.

This is a Slate Grey Metallic 1994 Porsche 928 GTS, located in Texas, with Grey interior, 82,500 miles on it, and the 5-speed manual transmission. I know grey is supposed to be a boring color and I don’t think I’d call Slate Grey exciting, but I do love it as an exterior color. It just looks really good. There’s not much more to it than that. Regarding the price change: when I first featured this 928 it was priced at just under $130K. Manual or not that’s a lot of money, especially for a 928 with almost 90K miles on it. The price now has been slashed substantially to a much more reasonable $82,500. I think we can work with that.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 928 GTS on eBay

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1993 Porsche 928 GTS with 5-speed Manual

Gosh it feels like forever since I featured a 928. I think I actually started off my last 928 post in the same way. Perhaps I should feature them more often. I really do like these cars. The look is beautiful and timeless and it’s hard to believe it’s been almost 25 years since the last one was produced. Even more hard to believe is how good the original design – with almost 40 years on it! – still looks today. But this isn’t about an early 928, but rather one from near the end of their production.

Porsche’s top-of-the-line front-engine GT was with us for 17 years and over that time followed the typical Porsche path of subtle evolutionary changes to its design and mechanical layout. Always a V8, displacement would gradually be increased from 4.5 liters to 5.4 liters with associated increases in power as well. In its final GTS form that meant 350 hp with either a 5-speed manual or 4-speed automatic transmission. The automatic was popular and for some actually more desirable, but the manual-equipped cars command the most money. The last one I featured was pretty low mileage and came with a very high price tag; relatively speaking this one is neither of those things.

Here we have a Black 1993 Porsche 928 GTS, located in Georgia, with Cashmere interior, the 5-speed manual transmission, and 69,673 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Porsche 928 GTS on eBay

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Ending Soon: What We’re Watching

Last week’s What We’re Watching post seemed to be a hit, so I’ve lined up another group of auctions. This time, they’re all affordable no reserve classics (or soon to be?). Care to wager on what each will sell at? Let’s start with a 5-speed Euro Porsche 928.

Click for Details: 1981 Porsche 928

It’s far from perfect, but here’s a 1981 Porsche 928 5-speed in Euro trim. The BBS wheels might look more at home on an early E39 540i, the paint is tired and the engine hasn’t run in some time (and what the heck is up with that shifter surround???) but hey, at time of writing the whole package can you yours for $3,000. Certainly it’s worth at least that in parts?

Click for Details: 1960 Volkswagen Bus

I said “affordable”, right? Well, with VIN tags of 23 Window Sambas selling for upwards of $11,000, this no reserve auction on a lovely restored ’60 seems like a deal. The color combination and condition are spot on, and it will be interesting to see where it ends.

Click for Details: 1993 BMW 740iL

Back to great values, and this 1993 BMW 740iL seems ready to please. It’s got lower mileage, the great E32 shape, a nice color combination and very good overall condition. Usually the big money has been reserved for the follow-up E38, so I think someone will get a great deal on this very nice ’93.

Click for Details: 1988 BMW M5

There’s been a lot of speculation on the 80s BMW M market, so seeing a no reserve auction on an M5 is both rare and offers us the chance to litmus test the market. Usually the cars that come up in no reserve format aren’t the nicest ones out there, but this one generally looks great. It’s a southern, claimed rust-free example with disclosed maintenance in mostly original condition. At time of writing, bidding is only at $15,000, so there’s still plenty of value with two days to go.

Click for Details: 2008 BMW 328i Coupe

A little more modern, but this 2008 BMW 328i Coupe offers you a lot of style for a budget-minded commuter. This one avoids higher pricing by forgoing the manual, sport options and X-drive, but at the end of the day it’s still a nice color combination, a pretty design and a reliable option that’s affordable to run. Bidding is only at $5,000 with a few days to go on the no reserve auction.

Click for Details: 2005 Audi S4

Debate still rages over which generation of S4 was “best”, but the appeal of the 3rd generation model is understandable. You got a 340 horsepower V8, available with a 6-speed manual, and great form-fitting Recaro seats. In fact the whole package is quite attractive, but the big drawback is the BBK 4.2 is known to suffer chain problems. This one is claimed to have a lot of chain noise, but it’s otherwise in great shape and appears ready to undertake the engine-out service. While it’s not for the faint of heart (or wallet), the bidding on this car is only around $3,000 – perhaps making the endeavor worth it for a mechanically inclined individual.

Click for Details: 2006 Audi A8L

Rather have your Audi turn-key? Here’s a D3 Audi A8L that’s come to market in a no reserve format. Again the color is black outside, but matched with a lovely nougat-colored interior. Miles are higher and these A8s certainly aren’t the most simple car on the block, but they also offer you a lot of car for the money. Current bidding is below $5,000, making the luxury liner a compelling option.

-Carter

1980 Porsche 928

When I was about my son’s age (he’s just turned 5, amazingly), my father took me to the Porsche dealership. Rows of new arrivals from Zuffenhausen lined up, a cornucopia of Easter egg-colored speed machines. In 1983, the low, organic, flowing shapes of the 911 and 944 stood in vast contrast to the bulk of three-box designs that proliferated the marketplace. But there was one shape that really stuck out to me – the 928.

In 1983, Porsche hadn’t yet abandoned its hope that the 928 would ascend to the top of the Porsche model lineup, and because of this I don’t remember seeing any 928s outside. Where I did see them was inside the showroom, where I distinctly remember one residing. My father was taken by the 911 (still is, to this day), and perhaps it was a father-versus-son stereotypical response, but the air-cooled model looked old and antiquated. The 928 was, both literally and figuratively, the antithesis of the 911. Water-cooled, front-engined, Grand Touring. It looked like a spaceship both inside and out. Clearly, this was the future I was witnessing.

Yet the 928, for all its press and relative market success, never caught completely on. It was never able to wrest the crown from the 911 as the signature model for Porsche. But what is perhaps most surprising to me is that it is one of the few cars that today, over forty years gone from its design phase, that unlike basically every other car model produced in the 1970s and 1980s, it still looks futuristic today. Okay, admittedly, the plastics have aged, tiny wheels with big, comfy side walls are no longer the norm and flush-fitted windows, lights, locks and antenna would clean the design up significantly. But compare this design to a few contemporaries, for a moment – the 1976 Chrysler New Yorker, the Toyota Cressida, or the Fiat 128. Three different nations, three different versions of the present, none anywhere near as revolutionary as the design that sits here:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Porsche 928 on Hemmings

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1988 Porsche 928S4

This actually is a revisit of sorts. Nearly three years ago, Paul featured this Black 1988 Porsche 928S4 with Burgundy interior. Now it’s back up for sale. Not much has changed. The mileage has increased by fewer than 1,000 miles and the condition looks more or less the same. Based upon where bidding on the previous auction left off the price does not appear to have changed much as well. It’s even been consigned to the same seller so I guess the buyer thought they did a good job. For such a nice color combination and pretty reasonable mileage this looks like a pretty promising 928!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 928S4 on eBay

Year: 1988
Model: 928S4
Engine: 5.0 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 56,715 mi
Price: Reserve Auction (Buy It Now $29,500)

Goodman Reed Motorcars

805-202-4557

Offered for sale is a striking, 56k mile, mechanically strong 1988 Porsche 928 S4, finished in menacing and factory correct Black over Burgundy leather. Ordered new by its original owner in New York, he would own the car for more than a decade, always keeping it garaged and maintained and using it sparingly (only accumulating 37k miles by 1999). The car made its way out to the West Coast in 2002, where it continued to be used as a weekend driver. We first acquired the car in 2014 and subsequently sold it to a buyer in New Jersey. In the ensuing two plus years, he put less than 1k miles on the car before asking us to sell it again on consignment, a decision precipitated only by a recent move and a lack of proper storage. Consequently we know the car well and can confirm that the 56k miles showing on the odometer are correct, documented by the car’s clean Carfax report and stamped service booklet.

When the 928 first hit the showroom floor, it was absolutely the car to have. As Porsche’s first seriously expensive GT car, the 928 initially drew the ire of Porsche enthusiasts worldwide, but as soon as they realized it wasn’t built to replace the beloved 911, rather to compliment it in an enthusiast’s garage, opinions changed. A big V8 Autobahn bomber, the 928 was far more civilized than the 911, boasting big comfortable seats, power everything, usually an automatic transmission and all the Star Wars/Reagan-era futuristic design elements that a successful 1980’s man could ask for. The 928 is a true GT cruiser; extremely comfortable with a torquey V8, making smooth, enjoyable driving effortless. Furthermore, in following with Porsche’s legacy, the handling is great and the looks are all-at-once timeless and era specific.

The original Black finish is in excellent condition: deep, lustrous and marred only by the most negligible of imperfections, none of which are significant enough to register in the pictures. The car’s body is entirely straight, free of any evidence of bodywork, and all of the panel fits and gaps are consistent and factory correct. The glass and rubber is in excellent original shape and the original alloy wheels are wrapped in nearly new Michelin Pilot Exalto tires. The car’s interior is equally as clean, the interior panels, carpet and burgundy leather seats showing only minimal wear, primarily (and typically) relegated to the driver side seatback bolster. With the exception of the Blaupunkt Montreal CD player, everything on the car is stock.

The car is also very strong mechanically, feeling like a tight, well-maintained 56k mile example should. Despite its relatively low miles, the car was always regularly driven and serviced and always garaged and professionally detailed. The engine starts effortlessly, producing a low rumble to announce its 316hp 5.0L V8. It’s smooth through all of the gears, pulling with incredible force when asked. With its quiet cabin and even drive quality, it’s very easy to look down at your gauges on the freeway and realize you’re doing 95mph when you assumed you were only a hair over 70. Despite the fact it’s a front engine V8, it’s still a Porsche and it performs with poise in the canyons as well as on the freeway.

This is an excellent opportunity at what is likely one of the cleanest 928 S4s on the market. With vintage Porsches appreciating faster than any other marque (save for Ferrari), the outlandish numbers that 356s and 911s have been realizing have made the 928 a legitimate and unique collector’s car. Tasteful colors, impeccable condition, low miles, 5.0L engine, etc. etc…if you’ve been looking for one at a fair, market appropriate price, it would be hard to find a better example.

We want this car to go to great home and would be happy to answer any questions or discuss a deal, so please feel free to email us or call us at 805-202-4557. You can also visit us online at GoodmanReed.

Goodman Reed Motorcars

Santa Barbara, CA

For U.S. buyers a 10% non-refundable deposit is required within 3 days of the auction’s end, the balance to be paid within 7 days of the auction’s end. Foreign buyers must pay in full within 7 business days of the auction’s end. Buyer is responsible for shipping, however we’d be more that happy to help with recommendations and arrangements. The car is listed locally and we reserve the right to end the auction at any time should it sell prior to auction’s end. Thanks for your interest.

I’m very much attracted to interesting color combinations and black over burgundy always will be one to attract my notice. Here it grabs my attention even more as I can think of few 928s I’ve seen spec’d as such. I don’t know the relative rarity of the burgundy interior on the 928; I just know I haven’t come across many. Like with any Porsche, though especially with the 928, you’ll want a PPI and a look through any available maintenance history to insure its service is up to date. With those typical caveats out of the way this 928 otherwise looks in nice shape. Bidding sits currently at $25,100 and has been slowly moving toward the BIN price. While we aren’t there yet, I suspect this one will sell.

It’s been a long time since Porsche’s front-engine GT was new to the market, but even so many years down the road they remain captivating machines offering a good deal of performance within a fantastic, almost timeless, design. While the GTS has become a very expensive option, these earlier years (even when not that much earlier) remain much more reasonable.

-Rob