Tuner Tuesday: 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo RAUH-Welt Begriff

I’m not sure I know where to begin. There is A LOT going on with this 911 and, in this case, that’s a good thing. I first saw this 1989 Porsche 911, modified by RAUH-Welt Begriff and Turbo Kraft, on Rennlist near the end of last year. It looked great and I actually thought it might sell pretty quickly even with its very high price. It had all the right attributes to attract the right sort of attention for what is a pretty over-the-top machine. Then I didn’t see it for a while so I thought it had sold. Lo and behold it had not sold so this time I wanted to take a closer look.

RAUH-Welt Begriff can be pretty divisive among 911 enthusiasts. Not only are Akira Nakai’s designs pretty wild, but many of his creations entirely consist of cosmetic modifications. They are cars that hearken back to many of Porsche’s early race cars with huge power, preposterously wide rear fenders, and massive wings all designed to keep the rear tires firmly glued to the ground. That sort of design in a road car isn’t always appealing and when there isn’t enough grunt to back up the looks the appeal is lessened further. However, there are exceptions; there are builds that possess the wildness of RWB’s designs AND the power to go along with it. This RWB is one such machine. The claims: 600 horsepower, 2,400 lbs. I don’t think outright performance will be an issue.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo RAUH-Welt Begriff on eBay

1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

I have somewhat of an obsession with these cars. There’s obviously a certain degree of obsession that applies to all of us here at GCFSB – whether writers or readers – but I mean this specifically in reference to the 3.0-liter 930. I can’t even really say why that is. I’ve never driven one or sat in one; I’m not sure if I’ve ever even seen one, at least, not any time recently. By all indications from those much more familiar with them than me, the later 3.3-liter 930 is better. It’s more refined, more powerful, and just a generally all around better performer. There also are a lot more of them so prices are much lower for all but the final year model. Yet here I am: show me a ’76 or ’77 930 and I will stop in my tracks to go over the whole thing.

The only thing I can say for sure about this obsession is that I definitely think the earlier whale tail Turbos – rather than those with the tea tray – are better looking. Functional or not, I’ve never really liked the look of the tea tray spoiler, whereas I think the whale tail fits the 930’s lines just about perfectly. The tea tray makes the 930 look clunkier while the whale tail makes it look lighter, which of course it is! If you add the Turbo graphics available at the time, then I’m completely on board. Perhaps someone else will understand this obsession. I don’t know. Either way, here we have another one up for sale and it looks quite good: a Silver Metallic 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera, located in San Diego, with black interior and 40,035 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

1978 Porsche 930

An early 930 is always a nice thing to come across. One that comes in a unique color palette is even better! The example we see here requires some sorting out, but let’s get to what we know. This is a Medium Green Metallic 1978 Porsche 930, located in Florida, with a white leather interior and green carpets. It’s said to have only traveled 39,500 miles. As you might note immediately this is a color combination we don’t see very often. The only other one I can recall is Kermit: the 1979 911SC Coupe painted Scirocco Viper Green. There may be others, but probably not many. As a testament to that rarity this one is said to have both a paint-to-sample exterior and a leather-to-sample interior. Rare indeed.

1978 saw the most notable changes made to the 930 over its 13 year run. The original 3.0 turbocharged flat-six was increased to 3.3 liters and an air-to-air intercooler was added. The rear spoiler was modified as well, changing from the whale tail to the tea try, so as to make use of that intercooler. And then a short two years later the 930 was no longer offered in the US market. So there aren’t a lot of them and while the ’78 isn’t typically as valuable and sought after as the earlier 3.0 liter they still do command attention.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 on eBay

1986 Porsche 930 Coupe

As I’ve more frequently turned my attention to modern 911s, largely in an attempt to locate better performance value, I am still reminded of the 930. The 911 has become quite refined over the years. Porsche has now long been a luxury brand and it is expected that its 911 Turbo will carry on that luxury. While the 930 wasn’t exactly a no-frills 911, it also would be hard to describe as refined. It was more than capable of biting a ham-fisted driver and strictly on appearance refinement hardly would be its calling card. That path lay for Porsche’s own venture into very high dollar territory with the 959. The 930 remained a menace.

It is that quality which always brings me back to it. Modern 911 Turbos are faster and more capable performers in almost any conditions, all while being able to serve as a daily driver. In many cases on the second-hand market they’re cheaper too. So why the 930? For me it just takes one look.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay

1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

It feels like it’s been a long time since I posted an early 930. Like many early editions of a model there is a rawness to them not replicated by later versions whose evolutionary changes sought to smooth the rough edges. There are a few currently up for sale, but I’ve featured them previously. Meaning they aren’t selling. That might tell us something about the current market for these Porsches and helps explain why more of them are not coming up for sale. But this is the first I’ve seen of this one.

According to the CoA this is a Platinum Metallic 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera with Cinnamon interior and optional sport seats. It now sits with just 35,770 miles on it. The color combination, especially with the contrasting painted Fuchs wheels, really looks outstanding and the overall condition is promising. Given its age it looks to have been very well cared for.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 RUF BTR

The well worn cliche is that power is intoxicating. While typically that expression is used in reference to abuses by individuals it seems no less applicable to cars. Once you get a taste of a level of acceleration, you begin to want more. And more. And maybe even a little more. Thankfully there exist outlets for such desires; builders who are happy to provide you with completely unnecessary levels of power in our continual pursuit of more. Just bring your wallet.

For your Porsche the name nearly synonymous with the need for extra power is RUF. RUF has been in the game for a long time, producing modified Porsches for 40 years. While in many cases these are conversions where the owner buys a 911 and has RUF parts added by an appropriate installer (or by RUF themselves), RUF also has produced their own builds utilizing nothing more than a Porsche chassis. These cars were badged as a RUF rather than a Porsche and come with a RUF VIN. The one we see most commonly and the one that really got the whole thing started is the BTR. Fitted with a 3.4 liter turbocharged flat-6 mated to a 5-speed manual the BTR was a much more powerful version of the 930 capable of outclassing most any production car available at the time. Naturally that extra performance along with their relative rarity makes them a highly sought after commodity. Here we have one such beast: a 1987 RUF BTR, located in Virginia, with 37,472 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 RUF BTR on eBay

1988 Porsche 930 Targa

We’ve seen a couple of Turbolook Carrera Targas come up for sale recently. Lovely cars and very rare. What we haven’t seen are actual turbocharged Targas for sale. The last time I featured one was almost two years ago. The feature before that takes us back almost another two years. While it’s extremely unlikely I would have seen and featured every 930 Targa to come up for sale over those four years, that tiny number of posts stands in stark contrast to the abundance of 930 Coupes and Cabriolets that grace our pages. In any given week I can almost always find a beautiful 930 Coupe to write about if I so choose. To some degree the same goes for the Cabriolet. The Targa, not so much.

In part this rarity comes down to production time – the 930 Targa only was available for three years, though that’s also true of the Cabriolet and we still see many more of those – and numbers: the Targa was produced in far fewer numbers relative to Coupes and Cabriolets. Why? Presumably they were less desirable. Porsche produced fewer 911 Targas in general. Still the 930 Targa remains a relatively more rare machine.

Anyway, here is one! A 1988 Porsche 930 Targa, located in New Jersey, with 68,100 miles on it:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 930 Targa on Rennlist

1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet

Last week I presented a 930 Slantnose that I thought was about as ’80s as a Porsche could get. While I don’t think this one pushes beyond it, it certainly brings with it its own ’80s appeal and includes elements that 930 Coupe lacked.

Here we have a Cassis Red Metallic 1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet with just 45,400 miles on it. The very fact that it’s a Cabriolet, rather than a Coupe, garners it an extra dose of excess in appearance. The Slantnose, side strakes, and massive spoiler when paired with a top-down environment really bring a peculiarity to the design that we don’t often see. The chrome wheels take it over the top. The full wood dash too strikes me as very much an ’80s sort of feature. Not that a wood dash itself dates the car, but when fitted to a Slantnose 911 Turbo it creates a disjunction combining luxury and aggression that feels very at home in the time period. It’s all quite fascinating, really.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet on Rennlist

Tuner Tuesday: 1985 Porsche 930 Slantnose

Have you been looking for the most ’80s Porsche you can find? Not just an ’80s model, but one that has taken the extra steps to modify it and add those little details that really showcase the time period? We’ve got just the car for you. Here we have a Black 1985 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe. The Slantnose itself always has been right at home in the ’80s exhibiting the general sense of excess in design with which we’re all familiar from those days. We dealt with the issue of authenticating the Slantnose conversion in our feature of this Slantnose and the issue presents itself again here as well. As the seller notes it isn’t until the ’87MY that these determinations become much easier.

The details don’t stop there though. This is more than just a Slantnose and especially once we step into the interior things really get interesting. The history of how this 930 came to be in its current state are a little fuzzy, but it’s had a good bit of work and houses some nice RUF upgrades. Let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Porsche 930 Slantnose on eBay

1986 Porsche 930 Coupe

I’ve been on a little bit of a 930 run lately so let’s continue that. This one isn’t a Slantnose, though it does look a little sad. And I mean that in a fully anthropomorphized sense. I think we can see why so many owners replace the standard headlamps. It does have the rear quarter vents and strakes like the Slantnose and it’s when we get into these areas that my interest rises.

This 930 presents us with a little bit of a puzzle. At least, it does if you’re like me and thinking about 911 values and markets and whatnot. The seller goes to great lengths about this being a show car. At first, I wasn’t sure what he was on about and why the insistence on mentioning it. A lot of older 911s and 930s appear at these events. That’s where the puzzle begins: This 930 isn’t in the vain of a SEMA-style show car, but it isn’t a regular 930 either. It’s modifications aren’t hugely significant, but they do seem purposeful and intended to attract a certain level of attention. The mileage is quite low and it looks in really good condition. The show car emphasis then began to make sense to me. The question I wondered: will prospective buyers have a similar level of appreciation?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay