1989 Porsche 930 Coupe

1989 Porsche 930 Coupe

I’ve been on a little run of 911 Turbos lately with most of those coming from the 930 and I always enjoy seeing such well cared for examples come our way. The 930 brings with it a clear ’80s vibe and as a child of that time it’s always nice to return to the poster cars of my youth. These were one of the first cars I’d see on the street and say, “What is that?” Of course, my response today would be no different given how rare it is to come across one on the street. Here we’re going to look at one from the final year of their production prior to the introduction of a new Turbo as part of the 964: a Guards Red 1989 Porsche 930 Coupe, located in Charlotte, with just under 56K miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay

1986 Porsche 930 Coupe

1986 Porsche 930 Coupe

Here we have another Porsche 930 Coupe, in certain ways similar to the Guards Red 930 we featured earlier in the week in that it’s from around the time when Porsche returned the model to the US market and appears to me to be a pretty reasonable value. However, this one brings with it one serious distinction: it’s paint-to-sample Garnet Red Metallic over a really nicely contrasting Cashmere Beige and Burgundy interior. The mileage is quite reasonable at 40,700 as well! This one could be a good example of a 930 that strikes the right balance between collector and driver. Meaning: it’s low enough miles and interesting enough that collectors should take notice, but has enough miles that it can be used (at least sparingly) without harming its value. Not bad at all.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay

1987 Porsche 930 Coupe

1987 Porsche 930 Coupe

What a difference a few miles makes, right? That’s a slight understatement regarding the mileage, but if we compare this Guards Red 1987 Porsche 930 Coupe with the Moss Green Metallic 930 Coupe featured last week we quickly notice the significant price difference between the two cars. Much of that difference comes down to their relative mileage, and some of it comes down to the much more unique color combination of the green one. Still, this 930 looks good enough in its own right and for essentially half the price it certainly appears to be a pretty nice value.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 930 Coupe on Excellence Magazine

1986 Porsche 930 Coupe

1986 Porsche 930 Coupe

Yesterday Andy featured a very interesting and original green on green early 928. It’s the sort of period-correct combination that we’d expect in the ’70s. Here we’re going to step out of the ’70s and raise the performance bar quite a bit, but retain that green on green profile. Unlike the 928, whose lighter Olive Green interior provided some contrast, this 1986 Porsche 930 Coupe has stayed on the darker side of the spectrum for both the interior and exterior. It’s certainly more monochromatic than the 928, but I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a light green interior I’ve liked so monotony aside, I prefer the combination here. The colors are Moss Green Metallic over Dark Green and, probably unsurprisingly, I can’t say I’ve come across another like it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay

Minerva Blue 1978 Porsche 930

Minerva Blue 1978 Porsche 930

I’m pretty much at a point where a Minerva Blue Metallic Porsche is an automatic feature for me. When that wonderful blue exterior is contrasted with a Cork interior, then I can’t feature it quickly enough. That’s exactly what we have with this 1978 Porsche 930 and like other such combinations we have seen, the appearance is phenomenal. 1978 marked one of the few model years of significant change for the 930. Most notably it brought an increase in displacement, now up to 3.3 liters from the 3.0 liter flat-six that had served during it’s first two years. The new engine also brought with it an air-to-air intercooler and the necessary redesign of the whale tail spoiler so as to better allow for airflow into that intercooler. Naturally those changes brought with them increased horsepower raising those levels to 265 hp (up from 245 hp) for U.S. models. Even though they are more powerful the ’78 and ’79 model year 930s don’t typically command higher values than their earlier 3.0 liter counterparts. The seller here seems intent on challenging that generally accepted notion.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Minerva Blue 1978 Porsche 930 on Hemmings Motor News

1979 Porsche 930

1979 Porsche 930

Take a beautiful blue car and place it next to the ocean (or any large body of water) and I will be attracted to it like a moth to a flame. It is a combination of color and environment that really speaks to me even if there is a certain monochromatic quality to the entire presentation. As should now be obvious my attraction to this 1979 Porsche 930 was kindled through just such an arrangement. The sky, the waves, the car. It all looks so inviting. Of course, once you’ve strapped yourself into this 930, fired up the engine, and attacked the local coast road the experience then takes on an entirely different dimension. That’s right where my mind is transported after taking in the still photos. It’s the total experience captured in a single photograph.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 930 on eBay

1988 Porsche 930 Coupe

1988 Porsche 930 Coupe

Time for something that’s a bit rare, but doesn’t necessarily seem like it. As I have said in the past, I’ve noticed that dark blues, especially of the non-metallic variety, seem pretty uncommon on late-80s 911s. I rarely see them, even though the color itself seems common enough in general that I feel like I should see more of them. Why that might be, I’m not sure, but I’d guess it just comes down to the popularity of certain colors at certain periods of time, kind of similar to how we don’t see Guards Red nearly as often once we reach the ’90s and later. Here we have one such beast, a 1988 Porsche 930 Coupe, located in Dallas, with 69,217 miles on it, and that the color is worn by a 930 makes it all the more special. We aren’t told the specific names of the exterior and interior colors, but given what was available at the time my guess is that this 930 sports a fairly ubiquitous sounding Dark Blue (Dunkelblau) exterior and a Linen interior. Assuming those colors can be verified as original that will make it a fairly rare thing amongst 930s.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 Porsche 930 Coupe

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 Porsche 930 Coupe

Modified cars from the 1980s enjoy are and interesting exercise in dichotomy. Take AMG, for example – add the flares, wide wheels, hunkered down suspension and turned up engine to a W126 and the asking price increases from a standard model by a factor of ten. What is strange about the AMG model, though, is that enthusiasts of the Affalterbach company accept licensed installers as proper original builds. Such is not the case when it comes to tuners like Alpina, Hartge and Ruf; generally speaking, in those cases the only “true” original examples came from the manufacturer’s facilities in Germany. In these cases, examples that are properly sorted and original can be worth double, triple or even quadruple what an identically modified car from a licensed installer in the U.S. would be worth. On top of that, AMG continues to be a bit of an aberration in the tuner realm since most other period modified examples of Porsches, BMWs, and Audis are worth less than a pristine stock example. It’s a bit of a head scratcher, since generally speaking, companies such as Alpina and Ruf put out equally good looking products when compared to AMG, and properly modified were just as luxurious and just as fast. Nevertheless, a tastefully modified example like this period Ruf-modified 1987 Porsche 930 just doesn’t seem to draw the same attention as a AMG 560SEC Widebody 6.0 would, for example. Let’s take a look at what a reported $75,000 in mods got you in the late 1980s:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 930 on eBay

1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera – REVISIT

1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera – REVISIT

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The Grand Prix White 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera we featured back in May is back up for sale this time with the price reduced by $10K. I don’t know if that reduction will be enough to see it sell, but with its sport seats and wider wheels this 930 has a few interesting options added to what is already a very nice car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site May 17, 2016:

1978 Porsche 930 Martini Championship Edition

1978 Porsche 930 Martini Championship Edition

Martini’s sponsorship is fairly well known in racing circles and the connection to Porsche has been solidified for decades. Naturally, Martini cosmetic packages have been around nearly as long. While mostly used by racers who desired a more bonafide appearance for their track cars, the graphics packages available from Porsche found their way to street cars as well. We’ve seen them on the 911SC and the 924. In some cases, if you had a chance to step inside one of those machines you might come across something truly special: a Martini package that included an interior treatment. These are wild and certainly not for the faint of heart. The most sought after of all were the packages applied to the 930. How many were there? The numbers don’t seem certain as I’ve seen suggestions ranging from three total all the way up to eight! As you can tell, regardless of the numbers there were very few of these genuine 930 Martini packages produced. The car we see here, a 1978 Porsche 930, purports to be one of those few. Whether it is can be hard to know for sure and we aren’t offered a lot here to validate those claims other than the reputation of a dealer that tends to traffic in some very high caliber vehicles. If it is the real deal, then this 930 not only should make for a wonderful edition to any Porsche collection, but it will also be quite valuable.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 Martini Championship Editionat Hexagon Classics

1979 Porsche 930

1979 Porsche 930

A funny little aside to open this post: when this 930 first came up on eBay the mileage was listed at 590,031. I thought, “holy hell that’s a lot of miles!” It would easily be the highest mileage 930 I’ve ever come across and it looked in pretty nice shape for that many miles. I wanted to know all about it. It’s history likely would be fascinating. Still, I suspected it was a typo. Especially since the seller made no mention of the mileage in the ad (you’d think something like that would come up). We all know that Porsche does some fantastic engineering work so perhaps it could be accurate, even on a 930. Well, it was a typo. The mileage is now shown at a more understandable 59,031. Darn. That removed what seemed the most interesting characteristic of this 930, but it’s still shown in a very nice, and rare, color so it remains worth our time. Here we have a Light Blue Metallic 1979 Porsche 930, located in Los Angeles, with a complementary dark blue leather interior and the stated 59,031 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 930 on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1984 Porsche DP 935-Kremer G5 Street 2

Tuner Tuesday: 1984 Porsche DP 935-Kremer G5 Street 2

When considering 1980s modified Porsches, there’s visually fine line between a poorly executed garage swap and a full-blood, racing heritage model. Many will be familiar with the name DP Motorsports, and though rare we have featured quite a few of the DP935 model. In fact, Rob looked at a pretty blue one earlier this year. However, while some love the racing-inspired lines and livery, many more detest the somewhat poser status. I say “somewhat”, because more often than not we’ve seen these DP 935s feature upgraded powertrains. But if you really want the chops to back up the Le Mans-ready looks of the DP 935, there was really only one place to turn – the Kremer G5 Street 2:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche DP935 Kremer G5 Street 2 on eBay

1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

This 930 has such amazing contrasts and I love it. Granted in 1977 (or even today) a 930 wasn’t exactly a shrinking violet so it’s going to draw attention regardless of what color it is, but still this is pretty much plain ‘ole Silver on the outside. But check out the interior. It is everything and its existence almost seems impossible given the exterior. These are the sorts of options Porsche made available during the ’70s and even if I can admit that they might be tough to love on a regular basis they are still so great to see and a testament to the wilder side of this seemingly staid German marque. So here we have a Silver 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera, located in Los Angeles, showcasing a Red interior with Tartan inserts and only 10,960 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

1979 Porsche 930 with 34 miles

1979 Porsche 930 with 34 miles

This is just absurd. The mileage, the condition, the price. Though interestingly not much is absurd about the color or options. It is in those regards a fairly standard example of an early 930. Here we have a triple black 1979 Porsche 930, located in Cleveland, with a mere 34 miles on it. How it is that a Turbo like this ends up with such low mileage, I have no idea. With unique colors, options, or models I can understand a collector buying a car with the intention of keeping it in such pristine shape. But on a standard black 930 I’m less certain how we get here. Regardless, here we are and even if there’s nothing particularly eye-catching about the color it is still a nice treat to see such a time capsule. Seeing this 930 is hardly different from walking into the showroom when it was new.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 930 on eBay

1988 Porsche 930 Cabriolet

1988 Porsche 930 Cabriolet

Contrasts: they don’t always work, but when they do they create something that is much more interesting than the norm. I think we see this a lot with modified cars where contrasts in style become much more prevalent. With factory cars these contrasts usually come about through color combinations between the interior and exterior, but even more so when those colors appear to contrast with the ethos of the car itself. That is what we have here. The 930 needs little introduction. As Porsche’s turbocharged rear-engine Goliath it provided rewards to those able to master its dynamics and treachery to those who could not. Subtle is probably the last adjective that might be used about it. In neither appearance nor performance is it anything approaching subtle. Cassis Red Metallic seems a near opposite. A color that is both vibrant and also soft that may even suggest playfulness. It’s beautiful in a way that belies the nature of the 930. When combined we get a stark contrast, one that has been found on many Porsches before and after it and which remains one of my favorite hallmarks of the brand. Does it work? That will be up to individual buyers. But it’s about as far from triple black – the über aggressive alternative – that we can get.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 930 Cabriolet on eBay