Motorsports Monday: Mecum Racing Porsches Roundup

As Rob mentioned in his Jade Green Targa piece the other day, we’re entering in quickly to auction season. Mecum, typically the purveyors of more muscle cars than European rides, nonetheless had quite an impressive lineup of signification Porsche race models that cover a few decades and many changes in the company’s history, so I thought it would be pretty neat to take a look at them. It’s very interesting to see over a relatively short period of time the many changes that Porsche’s motorsports programs have gone through.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 934.5/935 at Mecum Auctions

Tuner Tuesday: 1984 Porsche DP 935-Kremer G5 Street 2

When considering 1980s modified Porsches, there’s visually fine line between a poorly executed garage swap and a full-blood, racing heritage model. Many will be familiar with the name DP Motorsports, and though rare we have featured quite a few of the DP935 model. In fact, Rob looked at a pretty blue one earlier this year. However, while some love the racing-inspired lines and livery, many more detest the somewhat poser status. I say “somewhat”, because more often than not we’ve seen these DP 935s feature upgraded powertrains. But if you really want the chops to back up the Le Mans-ready looks of the DP 935, there was really only one place to turn – the Kremer G5 Street 2:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche DP935 Kremer G5 Street 2 on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo Slantnose Cabriolet

There are days when I look at my Audi Coupe GT and think I did it all wrong. I stripped it out, made it hot and uncomfortable; too loud, too stiff, too track biased. It’s fun to drive in short bursts when it’s not hot, or cold, or raining, but there’s a bit of regret that I’m not able to drive and enjoy it more regularly. And it’s too black – it looks fantastic when it’s briefly clean, but every single scratch, nick, and scuff stand out like pimples on a teenager’s face before prom. But, you’d say, it’s a lowly Audi Coupe. Most people don’t even know what they are, and even 95% of those who do wouldn’t care if I made it however I wanted it to be. But what if I had a bigger budget? And, what if I was even more crazy?

I might have made something like this 911. It started life as a ’87 911 Turbo Cabriolet. Maybe. But then someone had an idea, a lot of drugs, and even more money. The result is an absolutely crazy 935-inspired 911 Turbo Slantnose Cabriolet that is so wildly awesome and horrible at the same time you’ll never unsee it:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Turbo Cabriolet on eBay

Motorsports Monday: 1980 Parnelli/Interscope Porsche Indy Car

Most younger readers won’t immediately think any of the German marques were well established in single seaters prior to recent Mercedes-Benz domination in Formula 1. And to be fair, as individual manufacturers that is nearly the case, although Porsche did develop a pretty impressive single race winner in the flat-8 804 of 1962. And, let’s not forget that it was both Mercedes-Benz and Auto Union that had really spurred the development of modern single-seat racing in the pre-War Silver Arrows. But far more prevalent has been German participation in single-seater construction as engine providers. From Volkswagen’s spec racers right through the mighty screaming Williams BMW V10s, there’s a long and storied history of German power. But oval racing? That’s another story, right? Well, actually the Germans have been there right along, too – with Mercedes-Benz taking part in the inaugural Indy 500 through the mega-dominant Ilmore Penske PC-23. Porsche, too, has been tied with the Indy 500, running turbocharged V8s in March chassis in the late 1980s. But the more interesting story was the car that never ran – the 935-powered Parnelli/Interscope Racing entry from 1980:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Parnelli/Interscope Porsche Indy Car on eBay

Motorsports Monday: Ex-Joest 1978 Porsche 935

Even though they don’t generally get the big headlines, arguably the Porsche 934 and 935 were the most important car in developing the racing history and reputation of Porsche. While the 356 and early 911s were certainly notable, it was in the mid-1970s with the introduction of turbocharged 911 in 935 form that Porsche developed a sizable following of independents who raced the all-conquering Turbos. In turn, it was these race successes that convinced enthusiasts that the Porsche 930 was THE car to have. The 935 was, in many ways, a development of the earlier 934. Wide flares coupled with wheels and brakes from the prototype category 917 and 936 gave a purposeful and classic look. While the roofline and doors remained effectively the same as the production cars, few other details matched what you could buy at the dealer. One of the biggest developments was the aerodynamic “Slantnose” developed with help from Kremer; it would become the signature look for not only the 935s but also the most expensive versions of the 930 in the 1980s. The 935 also helped breach the gap in between the 917 program and the start of the 956/962; while the 936s were the direct transference between the two, it would be the 935 that would carry the Porsche flag around the world. Amongst the notable wins for the 935 were around 150 international victories including all-out victory at Le Mans in 1979 and multiple wins at both Sebring and Daytona. All of the top-tier racers of the day drove them, and top teams that still race today cut their teeth on the 935, such as todays example run by Reinhold Joest:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 935 Kremer K1 on racecarsdirect

1986 Porsche 911 Turbo DP 935 – REVISIT

After failing to meet reserve last time it was auctioned in August, you have another opportunity to turn the boost up to “11” on this 1986 911 Turbo DP935. The modifications and look can be a bit polarizing but this one has been updated nicely and it’s too garish in the realm of heavily modified 1980s cars. Last time there were two bids that hit $95,000 – this time, the seller opened the bidding at $95,000 with the reserve still on. I don’t expect it to sell at this amount this time around either – these DP cars take a special kind of buyer and some of the updates have unfortunately taken away some of the originality. What would you pay for this turbocharged wonder?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Turbo DP935 on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site August 19, 2014:

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 Ruf BTR Lightweight

While there are a plethora of Porsche 930s sporting Ruf details, when you get into the real Ruf vehicles you have crested a very high mountain of performance. Rufs emerged in the 1980s as the ultimate giant killers; cars whose performance exceeded the expectations of everyone in the motoring press and every stock vehicle they came across. Put simply, there were just no cars that were faster; even Porsche’s legendary 959 was bullied by the equally revered Ruf CTR Yellowbird in a high-speed test when they were new. They were, and remain, the most expensive and most highly sought modified Porsches available. Add to that the specialized lightweight versions of the already exclusive Rufs, and you’ve got something truly special and unique:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Ruf BTR on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1988 Porsche 911 Targa DP935 – REVISIT

Now primed for summer, the 1988 Porsche 911 Targa DP 935 Slantnose we wrote up earlier this year is still for sale. In the world of original DP cars, this is a bit of an oddity, but also more affordable than most of its turbocharged brothers. Will it leave you seeing red?

The below post originally appeared on our site February 11, 2014:

Click for more details: 1988 Porsche 911 Targa DP 935 Slantnose on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1984 Porsche 911 Turbo Convertible Slantnose Gemballa “935”

Oh, where do we start here? You shouldn’t be surprised that Sir Mix-A-Lot has a wide body, huge bespoilered Porsche 911 Turbo that’s purple; after all, he did tell you he “likes big butts”, and this Porsche’s got back. Rap stars from the 1990s really moved into a new realm of bling; West Coast saw the destruction through twist-and-bounce of countless classic 1960s cars, but rappers like Sir Mix-A-Lot moved into new territory, taking brand new “whips” and modifying them. But the self-proclaimed “Mack Daddy”‘s modern-day pimp style didn’t follow traditional trends of giant America sleds with fuzzy dice; the Sir liked European metal – including this turned up 911 Turbo Convertible Slantnose:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 911 Turbo Convertible Slantnose Gemballa on eBay

Motorsport Monday: 1984 Kremer CK5

Entering the world of vintage race Porsches is never a cheap thing, but especially when you come to the quite popular era of the turbocharged 935 cars or the 956/962 prototypes, you’re easily talking about millions of dollars to get into them. However, just outside the realm of the factory cars lie a few specials that were built utilizing factory know how, parts and technology; indeed, in some cases they were faster than the factory offerings. Few were quite as good as the Kremer modified 935s, arguably the ultimate evolution of the turbocharged 911. However, the 935 was really on its way out of the limelight in the early 1980s, replaced by a new formula of prototypes that the factory was throwing its weight behind. As a stop-gap measure until the all-new 956 was released, Kremer and Joest both took the existing – and Le Mans winning – 936 open cockpit racer and modified it into a closed cockpit prototype to the regulations. In the case of Kremer, the new car shared the title with the previous Kremer 936 replicas; it was called the CK5 – C for Group C, K5 for the fifth evolution of their 935 design:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Kremer CK5 on eBay