1994 Porsche 911 Speedster

I’ve featured the 911 Speedster quite a bit over the years. Enough so that these days they usually only catch my eye when there’s something pretty unique about them. While I like them a lot, and love the original 356 Speedster, there’s a degree to which they all blend together and are more or less the same: Black, White, or Red with very low miles and seemingly pristine condition. There’s little more to say than, “Here’s another 911 Speedster for sale.”

The version produced for the 964 is itself a little more unique. It’s narrow body reminds us much more of the original 356 compared with the Turbo-bodied 3.2 Carrera-based 911 Speedster. The color palette also appears to be more diverse, though that may be anecdotal rather than based on actual production. There are still plenty of Red, White, and Black.

This one shines through those colors like a beacon beckoning you to drive it. And driven it has been! Here we have a Speed Yellow 1994 Porsche 911 Speedster, located in St. Louis, with factory painted sport seats and 81,516 miles on it. 81K miles may not seem like much for a car that’s nearly 25 years old, but for the Speedster, a 911 always coveted by collectors, it’s a good chunk of mileage.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1994 Porsche 911 Speedster on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet – Ruf CR4 Conversion

It’s generally safe to say that we all like RUF. Their full builds can be spectacular both in appearance and performance, but almost any RUF to wear the badge, or simply share the name, possesses upgrades that make them very desirable. We very rarely see any related to the 964 so when we do come across one it’s always worthwhile to pause and take a closer look.

This is a 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet that was sent off to RUF for a “full” CR4 conversion perhaps around the year 2000. Like many conversions what exactly is meant by “full” might be a matter of debate, but in this case the engine does appear to have been blueprinted by RUF with horsepower now at 330. That engine likely represents what buyers will care most about. From the documentation it looks like the owners of this car purchased it from RUF in May 2000, but it’s not clear when that means the conversion itself actually occurred. Maybe there is other documentation to support that. It then was imported into the U.S. where it has resided ever since.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet – Ruf CR4 Conversion on eBay

1991 Porsche 911 Turbo

This Black on Black 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo has been for sale for a few months and I suppose the question is whether it still should be? With the air-cooled market not really blowing anyone’s doors off these days it perhaps is not surprising that no one has taken the plunge with this one. You can find an early 964 Turbo in the low $100Ks. Were this one priced there it obviously no longer would be for sale. Were it priced higher – like the $150K Grand Prix White example I featured not long ago – then I’d suspect it to have little chance of selling. As it stands now, this asking price splits the difference, which given the fairly low mileage is understandable and not at all unreasonable. Is this a sign that the market for these Turbos might be struggling even more? Or is simply a little more patience required?

I don’t know the answer to that right now, but this is a nice example and while not the most exciting color combination it is definitely one that should have broad appeal.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

Rubystone Red (Sternrubin) might be the most love/hate of the well known Porsche colors. I imagine there are colors within Porsche’s extensive catalog that have been less liked overall, but those colors disappear rarely to be asked for again. Rubystone, while we don’t see it very often, does still come around as a PTS option on modern 911s, especially on the limited production high performance models like the GT3 RS and 911 R. And when it does it looks just as stunning as it did upon its debut. A lot of buyers might not like it, but whatever its qualities, on cars that deserve a bold attention-grabbing color it’s a color that performs exactly that function.

Of course, it was on just such a model that it debuted: the 964 Carrera RS. We did not get the Carrera RS in the US market, but rather had to settle for the more tame RS America. With the passing of time it is now legal to import the true Carrera RS and we’ve seen quite a few over the past year or so. Here we have another one, fully restored and looking nearly immaculate, in that eye-popping color of Rubystone Red.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on eBay

1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe

I am going to return here to a long time favorite of mine: a Slate Grey Metallic 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe with only 23,863 miles on it. Here the Slate Grey Metallic exterior, which is the part of this 964 I most strongly prefer, is contrasted with a Linen interior. I’m not sure I’ve come across a similar example. Most have had Burgundy interiors. If I’m honest, I prefer the Burgundy, but there is something about the brightness conveyed by this Linen interior and I can see how it would be appealing. And unlike many of the Linen interiors we see on either a Cabriolet or a Targa this Coupe should be a little easier to keep clean since it is more insulated from the elements. Both exterior and interior look in nice shape and I think this looks like a nice early 964.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe on eBay

1991 Porsche 911 Turbo

The other day I was discussing the appeal of the Porsche 930. Let’s now jump to its successor, the different but also similar 964 Turbo. The 930 appeals for its general lack of smoothness. Its lines are a series of angles balanced by wide curves with the 911’s distinctive round forward pointing headlights leading the way. The 964 carried on that tradition, even if it was an almost entirely new design. The engine too was a refined version of the 930’s 3.3 liter flat-six mated to a 5-speed manual transmission. There would be engine changes in its final production years, but in ’91 and ’92 there was certainly a lot of familiarity to be found under that new skin.

This has placed those turbos in a somewhat odd space. They are surely desirable, but I’m not sure we give them nearly the consideration we do with the 930. The same is true when we compare the early 964 Turbo with the later 3.6 liter models. Their relative appeal is understandable: the increased performance and relative rarity of the 3.6 models makes them increasingly desirable. The desire for the 993TT – the last of the air-cooled Turbos – remains higher still. So what do we do with these less frequently recognized Turbos? I guess we might as well take a look at one:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

1993 Porsche 911 RS America

This 911 might make for an interesting test case. We’ve featured the 911 RS America a number of times throughout the years. It’s a car I like quite a bit. However, the consistent issue with almost any RS America is pricing relative to a standard 964 Carrera 2. While the RS America is indeed a lightened, more performance-oriented, version of the Carrera 2 the general sentiment has long been that the additional performance has not been worth the premium these cars have commanded in recent years. Like many of the rarer air-cooled 911 models, RS America prices elevated quite a bit and even if they aren’t as high as they once were they remain significant.

These days the actual full-blooded Carrera RS is available to import. On the one hand, given that the car the RS America aspires to be now is available we might see RS America prices take a turn downward. Why pay six figures for the pretender when you can get the real thing? On the other hand, prices for a Carrera RS are still significantly higher than for a RS America. Might this then keep RS America prices fairly strong? While not a true RS, they’re still marginally better than a Carrera 2 and you save quite a bit of money. I don’t know, but I’m interested to see how things play out.

But what about a RS America that tries to exist in a middle ground? That brings us to the example here. Being made available by Don Ahearn at Porsport, this RS America has been upgraded with factory RS parts to help align it more closely with the Carrera RS. It still isn’t to full RS specifications, but it’s closer. Might it have enough additional allure to support its higher price?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Porsche 911 RS America at Porsport

1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau

During my time writing about 911s I’m sure I’ve stated that quite a few different models might be my favorite. At one time or another certain cars always strike me and remind me of what it is that I love so much about them. Each model has its strengths and pulls at my imagination in varying ways.

Let it be known that this is my actual favorite model: the 1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau (lightweight). It’s the GT2 before the GT2 existed: a stripped out, higher horsepower, version of the standard 911 Turbo produced in limited numbers. Unlike the later ’94 Turbo S this one is based off of the 964’s original 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-6 and produces 381 hp, an increase of 61 hp over the standard Turbo. Weight savings stripped out nearly 430 pounds.

Visually the Turbo S is distinguished by its unique rear spoiler, Speedline wheels, and rear air inlets. There were 86 in total produced, with 67 of those coming in left-hand drive. The one we see here is even further distinguished by utilizing custom coloring throughout and it sits with a scant 95 km on the clock. Needless to say, this is a very rare opportunity to purchase one of the very rarest high-performance Porsches. It will be up for auction March 9 at the Gooding & Company Amelia Island auctions.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau at Gooding & Co.

Motorsports Monday: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS NGT

I’ve got a couple of very interesting and rarely seen 964s to start this week. Both, of course, are fairly expensive (well, in one case very expensive) and both showcase models not originally made available in the US market.

We’ll begin with this: a 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS NGT. Any Porsche enthusiast will be familiar with the Carrera RS. Whether you’re familiar with the 964 Carrera RS or not, the model itself is well known and follows the tried and true formula of combining more power with less weight to produce a wonderful performance-oriented 911. Less familiar is the RS NGT, a model that took the weight loss program of the standard RS a few steps further. So while we might think of the Carrera RS as a track-focused 911 you can enjoy on the street, the NGT really is more of a track car. The interior is fully stripped of all comforts (instead of carpets you get plywood floors!) and a full roll cage welded in place. Additional features like a long-range fuel tank, fire extinguisher, and external cut off further separate these cars from your standard RS. 290 were produced.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS NGT on eBay

Polar Silver 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6

I don’t know that this 911 model needs much introduction. It’s a much loved model by writers and readers alike here at GCFSB and I always feel a certain elation when I see another one come up for sale. For those not entirely familiar this is the 964 Turbo 3.6. We might say it’s what the 964 Turbo was supposed to be from the beginning, but it took a few years to come to fruition. It’s not quite the pinnacle of 964 Turbos since that is reserved for this car’s successor – the ultra-rare Turbo S – but I think for many the Turbo 3.6 itself is one of the holy grail cars. And while not cheap you can have one for far less money than a Turbo S. Heck you might be able to have three for less money than a Turbo S!

Here’s an excellent looking example, painted in the fairly rare color of Polar Silver. It’s located in Ohio and sits with 54,960 miles on it. The best part: it’s one of the best prices I’ve seen for a Turbo 3.6 in quite some time.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Polar Silver 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 on eBay