1969 Porsche 911E Coupe

It’s tough to tell, but this is a Bahama Yellow 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe. When first looking at it I thought that had to be an error. Or, at least, I thought it wasn’t actually painted Bahama Yellow even if that was its original color. The color looks more like Sand Beige (or something along those lines). As I looked more closely, however, it does appear to be the case that it is Bahama Yellow – the pictures taken inside the garage do a better job of showing the color than the outdoor photos. Bahama Yellow is on the darker side of yellow, though it is by no means a dark color, just darker for yellow. It also has a slight brown tint to it, which helps explain why it might look like a darker version of beige when photographed entirely in the shade. I suppose all of this is to say that this 911 actually is quite a bit better than I initially thought and I initially thought it looked really good!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe on eBay

1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

Just beautiful. I can think of no other appropriate way to describe this Iris Blue Metallic 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe. It isn’t perfect, it isn’t entirely original, nor is it an ultra-low-mileage garage queen. It’s just beautiful.

The version of Iris Blue Porsche gave us in the ’80s – note that it did change dramatically when the color came back in the ’90s – is one of those shades of blue that we’ve seen variants of throughout the 911’s history and it always captivates. It exists on the lighter side of the spectrum, which differentiates it from other great metallic blues like Gemini Blue and Minerva Blue, but it makes no sacrifices to its appearance. For those who are a fan of that lighter shade it makes for a very nice option. On a classic 911 it’s a crowd pleaser.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

Double Take: Grand Prix White Carrera Targas – Which 5-speed Will You Have?

If you find yourself desiring a classic 911 from the ’80s you’re immediately presented with a few decisions. The first of which, while seemingly the most straightforward, can actually present the biggest quandary: which model do you get, the 911SC or the 3.2 Carrera? Both are great and their similarities in design and performance are such that either model should fulfill your desires. But let’s say you’re set on the 3.2 Carrera. You want the improved performance and slightly more refined feel. You still have one more decision to make: would you rather find one of the earlier models (1984-1986) utilizing the long-standing 915 5-speed transmission or a later model (1987-1989) with the newer G50 5-speed transmission? It seems a minor detail, but the transmissions do make a difference. Most drivers find the G50 to be the nicer shifting of the two and it is a more stout transmission to begin with, a point that certainly could make a difference 30 years from new. However, the G50 also is heavier and typically the prices for the later Carreras, in part because of that transmission, tend to be higher. If you’re thinking strictly about adding one to a collection the G50 probably is the one to get. For a driver? It’s not so straightforward.

Generally speaking, unless you’re very patient most of these decisions will be made for you since you’re typically best off by buying the best available option from these years. A well sorted 911SC is likely to bring you more joy and fewer headaches than a 3.2 Carrera with some issues. Sometimes, however, the options are such that you really can have your choice and, in fact, in our case here your choice really is distilled down almost completely to the different transmissions.

Here we have two Grand Prix White 3.2 Carrera Targas with pretty similar mileage, pretty similar asking prices, and seemingly very similar condition.…

1981 Porsche 911SC Coupe

The 911SC remains one of my favorite Porsche models. It played an important role in the 911 establishing itself as the premier sports car in the Porsche lineup and without it this iconic rear-engine performer may have gone the way of Porsche’s many other former models. It also presents good value among the air-cooled line. While they played an important historical role, their relative simplicity has kept values down compared with some of the other models. So you can still get a good classic 911 in original condition without spending too much.

Or those values can allow you to follow another route. The 911SC becomes a canvas to build the 911 of your own. Along with the 3.2 Carrera these are the most commonly modified Porsches we see. However, unlike the Carrera, which builders tend to use as their foundation for building pretty highly priced back-dated 911s attempting to replicate the heroic Carrera RS of the past, the 911SC can be found in a wider variety of builds and generally much lower prices. It seems regardless of where they end up the 911SC keeps those values lower.

That’s more or less the situation with this 911SC. The owner bought it a couple years ago and began to transform it. The overall look is quite different, but it still maintains the basics that make it identifiable as one of these ’80s 911s. I’m not sure the price is quite right, but it’s not nearly as egregiously high as many of the Carrera builds we see. I think it provides a point we can work with.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1981 Porsche 911SC Coupe on eBay

1988 Porsche 930 Targa

We’ve seen a couple of Turbolook Carrera Targas come up for sale recently. Lovely cars and very rare. What we haven’t seen are actual turbocharged Targas for sale. The last time I featured one was almost two years ago. The feature before that takes us back almost another two years. While it’s extremely unlikely I would have seen and featured every 930 Targa to come up for sale over those four years, that tiny number of posts stands in stark contrast to the abundance of 930 Coupes and Cabriolets that grace our pages. In any given week I can almost always find a beautiful 930 Coupe to write about if I so choose. To some degree the same goes for the Cabriolet. The Targa, not so much.

In part this rarity comes down to production time – the 930 Targa only was available for three years, though that’s also true of the Cabriolet and we still see many more of those – and numbers: the Targa was produced in far fewer numbers relative to Coupes and Cabriolets. Why? Presumably they were less desirable. Porsche produced fewer 911 Targas in general. Still the 930 Targa remains a relatively more rare machine.

Anyway, here is one! A 1988 Porsche 930 Targa, located in New Jersey, with 68,100 miles on it:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 930 Targa on Rennlist

1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe

I love a red interior. Even the very bright red interiors. Porsche has long made such interiors available to those who like them. I also am a big fan of the 964. Curiously, I’m not sure I’ve ever featured a 964 with a red interior. Well, at least, not a standard 964. I think there have been a couple ultra-rare models, but I won’t count those.

At last I have found one: this Black 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe, located in Los Angeles, with a Matador Red interior and 105,420 miles on it. I don’t think I’ve seen Matador Red before, not knowingly anyway. It looks great with just the right amount of brightness. While it may only be the lighting in these pictures it doesn’t appear quite as bright as some of Porsche’s other offerings like Can-can Red or Lobster. I think for most that likely gives it a nice balance. For those who find a black car to be a bit dull, perhaps this interior will help liven things up. It’s quite beautiful.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe on eBay

Paint-to-Sample 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa M491 Turbolook

After seemingly going a while without seeing one it now appears Turbolook 911s are all coming out of the woodwork. I’ve posted a couple that I particularly liked, one of which specifically because it was a coupe as those still aren’t coming around very often. It is still the case that most of those we see are the earlier, and slightly less desirable, models with the 915 5-speed transmission. There are fewer of the later G50 transmission models with the ’89MY naturally leading the way in rarity.

But here we have one of those later models. It’s not a Coupe, but still has plenty of appeal in its own right: a paint-to-sample Marine Blue Metallic 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa with the M491 package and 81,713 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Paint-to-Sample 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa M491 Turbolook on eBay

1992 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup

Normally I would post this car as one of our Motorsports Monday posts, but since this listing is set to end on Monday that wouldn’t be terribly effective. So today will have to do. Regardless, I expect it still will be available after Monday as well.

This model should need little introduction, but for those unfamiliar with them this is 1 of the 45* U.S. Edition 964 Carrera Cup cars Porsche imported in 1992. The idea was that these cars would all compete in support races for the CART series. Alas, sponsorship for the series couldn’t be secured and these cars were left without a purpose. Porsche, however, had other ideas, converted them to road legal specs, and sold them to customers anyway. In most ways these served as a replacement for the Carrera RS, which the US never received. As the ad below notes some of those were returned to race trim with full roll cage and stripped interior. This is one of those cars.

*A quick about the numbers: there were 45 Carrera Cup cars imported for the race series, so I’m not quite sure what the 1 of 25 mentioned in the ad is in reference to. Perhaps the number of cars reverted to race trim?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera Cup on eBay

1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet

Last week I presented a 930 Slantnose that I thought was about as ’80s as a Porsche could get. While I don’t think this one pushes beyond it, it certainly brings with it its own ’80s appeal and includes elements that 930 Coupe lacked.

Here we have a Cassis Red Metallic 1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet with just 45,400 miles on it. The very fact that it’s a Cabriolet, rather than a Coupe, garners it an extra dose of excess in appearance. The Slantnose, side strakes, and massive spoiler when paired with a top-down environment really bring a peculiarity to the design that we don’t often see. The chrome wheels take it over the top. The full wood dash too strikes me as very much an ’80s sort of feature. Not that a wood dash itself dates the car, but when fitted to a Slantnose 911 Turbo it creates a disjunction combining luxury and aggression that feels very at home in the time period. It’s all quite fascinating, really.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet on Rennlist

1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet

I’m kind of mesmerized by this shade of blue. The color is Tahoe Blue Metallic and here it adorns a 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet for sale in Florida with 63,755 miles on it. We’ve featured Tahoe Blue Metallic before, but don’t see it often. It’s a rare color and wasn’t available for very many years. What really has me awed is the way it possesses so much color even while being photographed in the shade. It really pops and as someone who has always been a big fan of blue in general it’s a great version of the color. It won’t snap your head around the way Riviera Blue might, but it won’t blind you either. It reminds me of a richer version of Iris Blue from the ’80s and is just really pretty.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet on eBay