1959 Porsche 356A 1600 Reutter Coupe

I want to turn back the clock from yesterday’s very pretty Aetna Blue over Bordeaux Carrera 4S to see a somewhat similar early example of that color combination. Admittedly, the comparison here isn’t exact since the colors are not precisely the same, but I think we still get a sense of the way these colors work on a vintage Porsche and a sense of the inspiration for that modern example. Here we have a Meissen Blue 1959 Porsche 356A 1600 Reutter Coupe, located in Houston, with a Red leatherette interior. On this 356 the shade of blue is a little lighter and the shade of red is a little brighter. Nonetheless, we end up with an equally pretty Porsche and one that surely would be a prized part of any collection.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1959 Porsche 356A 1600 Reutter Coupe on Classic Driver

1965 Porsche 356C Cabriolet

I’m going to continue with my sunny weather open-top motoring theme and have a couple interesting Porsches to look at highlighting the full breadth of the Porsche range. Whether you want classic or modern, supercar performance or backroad cruiser, there’s probably a Porsche out there to suit your needs.

The one we see here, a Dolphin Grey 1965 Porsche 356C Cabriolet, is going to stretch the bounds of reasonableness when it comes to price, but for those seeking the truest sense of the vintage Porsche experience there may be few better options. This 356, which comes very late in the model’s production, is said to be in entirely original condition showcasing wholly original paint and interior. While I’m not sure it’s spent its whole life with one owner it does sound like its original owner possessed it until very recently.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 Porsche 356C Cabriolet on eBay

1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

I have somewhat of an obsession with these cars. There’s obviously a certain degree of obsession that applies to all of us here at GCFSB – whether writers or readers – but I mean this specifically in reference to the 3.0-liter 930. I can’t even really say why that is. I’ve never driven one or sat in one; I’m not sure if I’ve ever even seen one, at least, not any time recently. By all indications from those much more familiar with them than me, the later 3.3-liter 930 is better. It’s more refined, more powerful, and just a generally all around better performer. There also are a lot more of them so prices are much lower for all but the final year model. Yet here I am: show me a ’76 or ’77 930 and I will stop in my tracks to go over the whole thing.

The only thing I can say for sure about this obsession is that I definitely think the earlier whale tail Turbos – rather than those with the tea tray – are better looking. Functional or not, I’ve never really liked the look of the tea tray spoiler, whereas I think the whale tail fits the 930’s lines just about perfectly. The tea tray makes the 930 look clunkier while the whale tail makes it look lighter, which of course it is! If you add the Turbo graphics available at the time, then I’m completely on board. Perhaps someone else will understand this obsession. I don’t know. Either way, here we have another one up for sale and it looks quite good: a Silver Metallic 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera, located in San Diego, with black interior and 40,035 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

A little while back I wrote about the joys of top-down motoring. And, of course, the weather has not been cooperative since then. Nonetheless, sunnier days are ahead so I shall return to that theme with what looks to me like a pretty nice example: a Black 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with just under 61,000 miles on it. Of particular note on this 911 is its interior, which features beautiful Flamenco Red leather throughout with just the right amount of black contrast in the dash and carpets. That interior is a pretty rare find on a 993 and it looks really good here. As always, its contrast with the black exterior shows very well and serves to liven up the atmosphere created by that dark exterior color. That the Cabriolet makes the interior extra visible just makes it all the better.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on Excellence Magazine

1998 Porsche 911 Carrera S

The 993 C2S always has been one of the best looking 911s on the market. Maybe even the best. Combining the wonderful curves of the 993 itself with the wider rear of the 993TT made for a perfect marriage for those seeking a beautifully refined 911, but without the additional costs of the Turbo (nor all-wheel drive). That it also offered improved suspension, also borrowed from the Turbo, made it even better. (While this one does have the red calipers that would tend to designate the Turbo’s brakes, the C2S didn’t come with those. For the Turbo brakes you’ll need to find a C4S.)

While looking at this one I started to ask myself whether the proportions are off. It looked too squat and I began thinking it needed the rear spoiler from the Turbo to provide balance. Perhaps it’s just an effect of the angles and lighting of the photography, or maybe because it’s black, which doesn’t really show the curves as much as brighter colors. On the rare occasions I see one in the flesh I do find the 993TT to be a gorgeous car that snaps my head around in a way no modern 911 Turbo ever could. The C2S reminds me a lot more of those modern Turbos.

The picture I chose to lead with is the one I think looks the best. Perhaps it’s telling that the presence or lack of the spoiler isn’t readily apparent from that angle. It’s still a beautiful car, possessing all of the attributes that make a 911 so captivating; I’m starting to wonder if it could be better. Maybe it’s not perfect after all.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1998 Porsche 911 Carrera S on eBay

1978 Porsche 911SC Coupe

I featured a Petrol Blue Metallic Targa not too long ago. It was a lovely car, though in need of a little care to bring its paint back to proper form. Here we have a very similar 911 – it wears that same Petrol Blue Metallic exterior and contrasts it with the same Cork interior. It’s also from the same model year, the first year of 911SC production. It is a Coupe rather than a Targa and I’m finding myself liking it quite a bit more. It’s in a little better condition, but I don’t think that’s what is really attracting me.

I am a big fan of the Targa. I’ve made that quite known. Moving beyond its open-top versatility, one of the things I like about the Targa is the contrast the roll hoop provides to the rest of the exterior. I like the look and especially the way it integrates so well with the 911’s lines. For whatever reason I think with Petrol Blue I don’t like it as much. The chrome accents don’t go as well with this color and I think that’s why I find myself more drawn to this Coupe than I did the Targa. Overall, I like this 911SC quite a bit!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 911SC Coupe on eBay

1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

I wrote the other day about the approaching warmer weather and the joy of top down driving. That was as an introduction to a Cabriolet but I know not everyone is interested in the full top-down experience. Especially the associated weight gains or lack of rigidity that goes along with it. Or perhaps you’re more interested in an air-cooled 911 regardless of the model. In either case, this 911 may suit your needs a little better: a 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa, located in California, with only 26,900 miles on it.

Of course, from a performance standpoint this Carrera Targa isn’t going to match a 996 Turbo Cabriolet. And the price may end up more or less the same so performance per dollar certainly is way down. But a classic like this isn’t just about the performance. It’s about feel and connectedness and the sense that you, the driver, ultimately are in command. For some that is enough to turn them away from any water-cooled 911 and toward these classics. For others the allure of 415 hp simply cannot be passed up. Options are good!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

1977 Porsche 911S Coupe

It’s been a little while since we checked in on the market for the mid-year 911. Mostly that’s due to not frequently coming across particularly desirable examples. As one of the least loved of the air-cooled 911 range, and with performance and reliability concerns being largely responsible for that lack of love, these simply aren’t models that owners tucked away, using only for weekend cruising, or models that restorers have had their eye on returning to former glory.

This one is an exception. It has been fully restored and even though that restoration occurred seven years ago it still looks in wonderful condition. It’s also a nice color combination even if dark green metallics tend to attract less attention than other available colors. For those who are fans of dark green though – and I count myself in that group – I think this combination should have a good deal of appeal. The asking price strikes me as a bit high, but, again, I haven’t had a good eye on the market so a nice example could be capable of fetching this value. We shall see. Let’s take a look: here we have an Oak Green Metallic 1977 Porsche 911S Coupe with Cork interior.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 911S Coupe on eBay

1978 Porsche 930

An early 930 is always a nice thing to come across. One that comes in a unique color palette is even better! The example we see here requires some sorting out, but let’s get to what we know. This is a Medium Green Metallic 1978 Porsche 930, located in Florida, with a white leather interior and green carpets. It’s said to have only traveled 39,500 miles. As you might note immediately this is a color combination we don’t see very often. The only other one I can recall is Kermit: the 1979 911SC Coupe painted Scirocco Viper Green. There may be others, but probably not many. As a testament to that rarity this one is said to have both a paint-to-sample exterior and a leather-to-sample interior. Rare indeed.

1978 saw the most notable changes made to the 930 over its 13 year run. The original 3.0 turbocharged flat-six was increased to 3.3 liters and an air-to-air intercooler was added. The rear spoiler was modified as well, changing from the whale tail to the tea try, so as to make use of that intercooler. And then a short two years later the 930 was no longer offered in the US market. So there aren’t a lot of them and while the ’78 isn’t typically as valuable and sought after as the earlier 3.0 liter they still do command attention.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 on eBay

1971 Porsche 911T Targa

Among 911s that really pop off the page this Gold Metallic 1971 Porsche 911T Targa really stands out. It won’t grab you because of what model it is; this is the entry-level 911 of its day and the Targa itself doesn’t really draw the eyes as much as the longhood Coupe. But that Gold Metallic paint attracts your eyes and doesn’t let go. I’ve seen this color a few times not looking at its best and the difference in appeal is substantial. So it’ll probably require effort to keep it looking this good, but I’m guessing any new owner will have no problem putting in the elbow grease to keep this early 911 looking great.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 Porsche 911T Targa on eBay