1978 Porsche 930

An early 930 is always a nice thing to come across. One that comes in a unique color palette is even better! The example we see here requires some sorting out, but let’s get to what we know. This is a Medium Green Metallic 1978 Porsche 930, located in Florida, with a white leather interior and green carpets. It’s said to have only traveled 39,500 miles. As you might note immediately this is a color combination we don’t see very often. The only other one I can recall is Kermit: the 1979 911SC Coupe painted Scirocco Viper Green. There may be others, but probably not many. As a testament to that rarity this one is said to have both a paint-to-sample exterior and a leather-to-sample interior. Rare indeed.

1978 saw the most notable changes made to the 930 over its 13 year run. The original 3.0 turbocharged flat-six was increased to 3.3 liters and an air-to-air intercooler was added. The rear spoiler was modified as well, changing from the whale tail to the tea try, so as to make use of that intercooler. And then a short two years later the 930 was no longer offered in the US market. So there aren’t a lot of them and while the ’78 isn’t typically as valuable and sought after as the earlier 3.0 liter they still do command attention.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 on eBay

1971 Porsche 911T Targa

Among 911s that really pop off the page this Gold Metallic 1971 Porsche 911T Targa really stands out. It won’t grab you because of what model it is; this is the entry-level 911 of its day and the Targa itself doesn’t really draw the eyes as much as the longhood Coupe. But that Gold Metallic paint attracts your eyes and doesn’t let go. I’ve seen this color a few times not looking at its best and the difference in appeal is substantial. So it’ll probably require effort to keep it looking this good, but I’m guessing any new owner will have no problem putting in the elbow grease to keep this early 911 looking great.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 Porsche 911T Targa on eBay

Petrol Blue 1978 Porsche 911SC Targa

I don’t normally prefer to post two cars from the same seller on consecutive days, but this seller has two very different 911s for sale and I like both of them quite a bit and for entirely different reasons. So, here we are. Yesterday’s 964 Turbo showed us a fairly pristine example of the 3.3 liter Turbo. It’s a model I probably don’t pay enough attention to focusing instead on the 930 that preceded it or the later 3.6 liter 964s. It came with a very high price tag.

Here we have something entirely of a different nature. This is a Petrol Blue 1978 Porsche 911SC Targa with Cork interior and 65,500 miles on it. It’s not pristine – though the mileage is fairly low – but the color combination is phenomenal and the added detail provided by the Targa roll hoop enhances the overall look. Compared with the 964, the price should be much more reasonable.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Petrol Blue 1978 Porsche 911SC Targa on eBay

Funny Fiber Double Take: 1974 Bradley GT II v. 1980 Aquila

Kit cars don’t get much love on these pages. Well, to be fair, they don’t get much love, period. But kits cars do offer something; exotic(ish) looks on a pedestrian budget. And strangely enough, some kit car and limited-manufacture cars have begun to be considered collectable in their own right. So when I came across two unique Volkswagen-based bits, I thought “why not?”

So today we have two very limited production examples of fiberglass laid over a VW chassis. Which is the winner? Let’s start with the Bradley GT II:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Bradley GT II on eBay

1991 Porsche 911 Turbo

The other day I was discussing the appeal of the Porsche 930. Let’s now jump to its successor, the different but also similar 964 Turbo. The 930 appeals for its general lack of smoothness. Its lines are a series of angles balanced by wide curves with the 911’s distinctive round forward pointing headlights leading the way. The 964 carried on that tradition, even if it was an almost entirely new design. The engine too was a refined version of the 930’s 3.3 liter flat-six mated to a 5-speed manual transmission. There would be engine changes in its final production years, but in ’91 and ’92 there was certainly a lot of familiarity to be found under that new skin.

This has placed those turbos in a somewhat odd space. They are surely desirable, but I’m not sure we give them nearly the consideration we do with the 930. The same is true when we compare the early 964 Turbo with the later 3.6 liter models. Their relative appeal is understandable: the increased performance and relative rarity of the 3.6 models makes them increasingly desirable. The desire for the 993TT – the last of the air-cooled Turbos – remains higher still. So what do we do with these less frequently recognized Turbos? I guess we might as well take a look at one:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

1986 Porsche 930 Coupe

As I’ve more frequently turned my attention to modern 911s, largely in an attempt to locate better performance value, I am still reminded of the 930. The 911 has become quite refined over the years. Porsche has now long been a luxury brand and it is expected that its 911 Turbo will carry on that luxury. While the 930 wasn’t exactly a no-frills 911, it also would be hard to describe as refined. It was more than capable of biting a ham-fisted driver and strictly on appearance refinement hardly would be its calling card. That path lay for Porsche’s own venture into very high dollar territory with the 959. The 930 remained a menace.

It is that quality which always brings me back to it. Modern 911 Turbos are faster and more capable performers in almost any conditions, all while being able to serve as a daily driver. In many cases on the second-hand market they’re cheaper too. So why the 930? For me it just takes one look.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay

Double Take: Brown 911s – Classic vs Modern

I will admit here I am really stretching the boundaries of what makes sense for a double take. I had already come across this Nutmeg Brown Metallic 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe and wanted to write it up because of its fairly rare and unusual exterior color. I like darker metallic browns a lot and we almost never see them outside of a few years in the 70s and 80s. I’ll admit that brown isn’t the most appealing car color for many, but in the right circumstances it can work quite well.

Then I came across a much newer 911 in a very similar color and thought, why not? So if you are a fan of these dark brown exteriors this might give you a sense of your options and, what for me is perhaps the most interesting aspect of this, the relative cost and performance that’s available to you. Let’s look at the Nutmeg Brown Carrera first:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on Excellence Magazine

Irish Green 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Club Sport

I have featured this car previously, but some cars are worth revisiting should they come up for sale again. This is truly one of those special cars. This is an Irish Green 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Club Sport. Naturally, the Club Sport is a lightened factory Carrera with upgraded suspension and a modest boost in power. Weight savings came about through the typical means: remove basically all of the creature comforts along with the rear seats. Voila, 154 pounds lost! They also are very rare with only 340 produced worldwide from 1987-1989.

Of those 340, a mere 28 Club Sports came to the US market and this is the only example in Irish Green. (I’m not sure if it’s the only example worldwide in Irish Green. I suppose that depends on how we read that statement.) It has traveled a mere 9,311 miles during its 29 years of existence and I’m guessing none of those have been track miles. It looks absolutely phenomenal and is said to be entirely original. If you missed your chance at this very rare 911 last time, then here you have another shot at it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Irish Green 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera Club Sport on Excellence Magazine

1993 Porsche 911 RS America

This 911 might make for an interesting test case. We’ve featured the 911 RS America a number of times throughout the years. It’s a car I like quite a bit. However, the consistent issue with almost any RS America is pricing relative to a standard 964 Carrera 2. While the RS America is indeed a lightened, more performance-oriented, version of the Carrera 2 the general sentiment has long been that the additional performance has not been worth the premium these cars have commanded in recent years. Like many of the rarer air-cooled 911 models, RS America prices elevated quite a bit and even if they aren’t as high as they once were they remain significant.

These days the actual full-blooded Carrera RS is available to import. On the one hand, given that the car the RS America aspires to be now is available we might see RS America prices take a turn downward. Why pay six figures for the pretender when you can get the real thing? On the other hand, prices for a Carrera RS are still significantly higher than for a RS America. Might this then keep RS America prices fairly strong? While not a true RS, they’re still marginally better than a Carrera 2 and you save quite a bit of money. I don’t know, but I’m interested to see how things play out.

But what about a RS America that tries to exist in a middle ground? That brings us to the example here. Being made available by Don Ahearn at Porsport, this RS America has been upgraded with factory RS parts to help align it more closely with the Carrera RS. It still isn’t to full RS specifications, but it’s closer. Might it have enough additional allure to support its higher price?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Porsche 911 RS America at Porsport

Porsche 911 Carrera M491 Roundup

This is starting to get a little bit silly. As I mentioned in my most recent feature of a Turbolook Carrera Cabriolet, we’ve seen a decent number of these 911s, also known by their M491 option code, come up for sale recently. I wasn’t really looking to post more of them. But then three all popped up for sale within a few days of one another and there are a lot of similarities among them. I still wasn’t entirely sure about posting them, but honestly two of them are so interesting and unique that I simply could not pass them by. Given how similar they all are it made the most sense to bring them all together into a single post.

One piece of good fortune: among these three cars we have a representative of each Carrera model so regardless of which model M491 you’re looking for we’ve got you covered! The similarities: All three of these Carreras are in exceptionally good condition and sit with very low mileage. All are from the earlier side of 3.2 Carrera production, meaning they have the 915 5-speed transmission. Two are for sale from the sale seller, presumably as part of the same collection, and come with a few questions, but have crazy unique interiors. All three have very high prices; high enough that when I first came across the Coupe we’ll see below I thought the seller had misidentified a 930. And I still thought the price was too high!

Anyway, on to the cars. I’ll show them all before any discussion and in ascending order by price:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay