1982 Porsche 911SC Turbo Look

This 911 is a little bit of a curiosity. It should be of interest to particular buyers and could be a nice opportunity at a unique 911 for reasonable cost, two things that do not always go hand in hand. I’m also specifically interested in what it should cost, but we’ll get into that below.

So what is it? It’s a 1982 Porsche 911SC Coupe with all of the standard 911SC running gear, but with the body, suspension, braking, and interior of a ’88 930. That makes it similar to the M491-equipped Carreras that Porsche made available from the factory, though obviously this one was not built by the factory. An M491 911 can be a pretty expensive purchase. This one shouldn’t be and in that regard provides something different for those who would like a Turbo-look 911, but can’t stomach the high price. It’s definitely in driver level condition, but the engine and transmission have been rebuilt so hopefully it is mechanically sound.

As they say, the devil is in the details and this one definitely will require a knowledgeable person to look it over and insure all of the work was done properly. The current owner has put a decent number of miles on it so hopefully he too can help with those details. If it all checks out, then it should be a fun car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 911SC Turbo Look on eBay

1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Coupe

A couple of weeks back I posted a Champagne Yellow 1969 911E that looked reasonably good, but definitely was in need of some work. The exterior color was a bit muted and didn’t really hint at the way it can shine. That problem is entirely solved on this 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Coupe, located in New York, with Dark Green leatherette interior and a little over 61K miles on it.

This 356 has been fully restored and provides a clue as to how we could expect that 911E to look (at least on the outside) were it too to undergo a restoration. The paint shows much brighter and deeper, though it’s still a softer yellow rather than one of the very bright yellows in the Porsche catalog. The dark green interior makes for a very interesting contrast. Not only would I not normally consider green as an interior color, but I’m not sure I’d ever think to pair it with a yellow exterior. It makes for a lively combination though, which we can really see in the interior where the two colors come together along the dash. It’s definitely unusual, but also quite pretty.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Coupe on eBay

1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

I will admit high prices on cars will almost always attract my attention. Or I guess I should say relatively high prices, meaning an obviously high price for that year and model. Those prices stoke my curiosity. I wonder what is so special about them that such an asking price would even be suggested. Unusual colors, interior, very low mileage? Maybe that’s part of the point. Without the very high price I might not take extra notice. After figuring why the price is so high my interest then turns to whether it might actually sell for such a price. That element of curiosity mostly is instructive rather than anything of particular interest, but it can be helpful nonetheless.

That is more or less why we are here and why I’m featuring this Cassis Red Metallic 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe with Burgundy interior. Cassis Red is a very nice color that works well on the 3.2 Carrera’s lines so I likely would have been drawn to this 911 regardless of the price. But the very high asking price caught my eye almost as quickly as the color.

So why such a high price? Because this Carrera has a mere 7,700 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on Classic Driver

Bamboo Beige 1981 Porsche 911SC Coupe

Those that have been reading here for a while know that I like to highlight Porsche colors that we rarely see. This is especially the case when the specific color in question is one that I have never come across. Such is the case today with this 911. Here we have a Bamboo Beige 1981 Porsche 911SC Coupe, located in Los Angeles, with 92,185 miles on it and which is up for auction without reserve.

I will be the first to admit that Bamboo Beige is neither the most exciting sounding, nor the most exciting looking color in the Porsche lineup. It’s a color that we’d expect to see in the late-70s or early-80s and its very short availability from ’81-’82 serves as testament to that. I can’t say I’ve ever seen it come up as a PTS option either. Sometimes a color is rare because of a lack of interest from buyers and with a reported 50 total examples produced that may be the case with this one. The desirability of a color is a fickle thing though. Guards Red and Speed Yellow both have seemed very desirable at times while at others we almost never see them. And nearly every color has some who do truly like it. I’m sure Bamboo Beige would be no different in that regard.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Bamboo Beige 1981 Porsche 911SC Coupe on eBay

1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

I almost feel like I’ve taken a hiatus from classic 911s of late. So I shall return to them with this Guards Red 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, located in Massachusetts, with 46,900 miles on it. We see Guards Red pretty frequently on the 3.2 Carrera, less so on the 964, and then even less on the 993. After that? It almost seems to disappear. We do occasionally see red Porsches still today, especially as a PTS option, but it’s certainly a color that seems much less in style than it once did.

Here in the District we’ve been mired in an interminable cloud of rain with plenty of lightning and wind thrown in for good measure. It has been the sort of rain that doesn’t even allow for the barest hint of the sun’s existence. It has me dreaming of the days when blue sky and bright sunshine will return and that has me thinking about Cabriolets again. In the meantime all we can do is plan and wait and try to stay dry.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

1976 Porsche 911S Targa

For a color that never seems very common on the roads I do seem to come across a lot of yellow 911s. I like yellow as a car color so that works for me! It’s been available in various forms throughout the 911’s existence and that’s why we tend to see them fairly frequently. Among the respective models they remain pretty rare, but along the entire range we see them often enough. This one, a Talbot Yellow 1976 Porsche 911S Targa with 93,044 miles on it, definitely fits that bill and given the lack of love the mid-year 911s tend to receive it may even end up coming in at a pretty good value. That yellow exterior is contrasted with a Cinnamon interior and it has the cookie-cutter wheels rather than Fuchs.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911S Targa on eBay

1969 Porsche 911E Coupe

I got a good chuckle out of the opening to this ad. “Not bad!” That doesn’t seem far off from saying, “Doesn’t suck!”, but I guess we can at least appreciate the level of honesty. I don’t know that I’d say this Champagne Yellow 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe comes with a bit of risk – I think you’d probably have a sense of what you’re getting yourself into – but it does clearly need some work. It’s not in bad shape though. It’s driver quality, that’s for sure, but relative to a lot of 911E Coupes we see the price does actually appear to account for that quality.

1969 was the first year for the 911E, which sat between the entry-level 911T and the top-of-the-line 911S. The E shared a few features with the S and mostly represented a slightly less sporting version of those highly-sought after 911s. Hydro-pneumatic struts replaced the torsion bars up front and like the S the E had ventilated brake discs. It also shared its mechanically fuel injected engine, though in a lower tuned state: 140 hp vs 170 hp. Still it represented a nice step up from the entry-level T. 1969 also was the year Porsche lengthened the wheel base for all 911 and 912 models. So there are a decent number of first year aspects to this 911 and the color is fairly uncommon.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo RAUH-Welt Begriff

I’m not sure I know where to begin. There is A LOT going on with this 911 and, in this case, that’s a good thing. I first saw this 1989 Porsche 911, modified by RAUH-Welt Begriff and Turbo Kraft, on Rennlist near the end of last year. It looked great and I actually thought it might sell pretty quickly even with its very high price. It had all the right attributes to attract the right sort of attention for what is a pretty over-the-top machine. Then I didn’t see it for a while so I thought it had sold. Lo and behold it had not sold so this time I wanted to take a closer look.

RAUH-Welt Begriff can be pretty divisive among 911 enthusiasts. Not only are Akira Nakai’s designs pretty wild, but many of his creations entirely consist of cosmetic modifications. They are cars that hearken back to many of Porsche’s early race cars with huge power, preposterously wide rear fenders, and massive wings all designed to keep the rear tires firmly glued to the ground. That sort of design in a road car isn’t always appealing and when there isn’t enough grunt to back up the looks the appeal is lessened further. However, there are exceptions; there are builds that possess the wildness of RWB’s designs AND the power to go along with it. This RWB is one such machine. The claims: 600 horsepower, 2,400 lbs. I don’t think outright performance will be an issue.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Turbo RAUH-Welt Begriff on eBay

1972 Porsche 911S Coupe

I’ve got a couple more yellow 911s I’d like to feature. This one in particular possesses a strong resemblance to the Summer Yellow 3.2 Carrera featured Wednesday. This 1972 Porsche 911S Coupe would not be the same color (Limonengelb), but it’s still quite similar. We aren’t told the color code of this one, but I suspect it is either Lemon Yellow/Canary Yellow (Zitronengelb) or Light Yellow (Hellgelb). Two very similar colors and very difficult to distinguish in the shade. Both are very attractive as evidenced by this 911S.

It feels like forever since I’ve featured an early 911S and this is a particularly nice example for me to return to them with. It’s been fully restored and looks immaculate right now. It shows a black interior containing sports seats with houndstooth inserts. It doesn’t get much better than that for the seats and they complement the exterior yellow very well. Original mileage is unknown, but the listing states the current mileage as 500, which I assume is the number of miles traveled since it was restored.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Porsche 911S Coupe on eBay

1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet

This is a first. I’ve never seen a 911 like this. The colors, I mean. The typical pairing for a yellow exterior is a black interior. The contrast works well as the two colors accent each other. The combination here is one that most probably would not consider. Here we have a Summer Yellow 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with Mahogany leather interior and 59,003 miles on it.

I have not heard of Summer Yellow. After some searching my guess is that this is Limonengelb (code: M1A), which only was available in ’87 and ’88 for the 911 and 924. Limonen translates to Lime. Generally when we think of limes we think of green, not yellow. Perhaps that’s why it’s called Summer Yellow. Either way it’s a very happy looking color! It might be better suited on a Beetle than a 911, but it’s a bright happy yellow 911 nonetheless. Do I like the pairing with Mahogany? That I’m not sure about. It certainly seems quite earthy and I’d be interested to see it in person. That this is a Cabriolet, i.e. the top also is Mahogany, really is playing up the contrast between these two colors. Ultimately, I think I’d prefer this combination on a Coupe, where the yellow canvases the entire exterior, rather than a Cabriolet. It should be a very rare combination though.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay