1978 Porsche 911SC Coupe

Wow, I am so torn by this 911. I genuinely really, really, like it. But it has some issues, most notably the price. Let’s get to those later though. First, it just looks stunning. This is one of the more attractive 911SC Coupes I’ve come across even if its colors – Grand Prix White over Cork – are not necessarily those I would typically clamor for. The two come together beautifully though and the overall condition of the entire package looks very good. Neither the interior nor the paint are original – one of those issues I mentioned – but both look well done by their respective restorers. It sounds like it comes with a large number of records dating back to its inception and the mileage sits in a very reasonable place: not so low that you worry over adding additional mileage, but not very high either. For those seeking a lighter-hued 911SC I think this first-year model would make for a great choice.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 911SC Coupe at Chequered Flag International

1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe – M491

If you’ve been searching for a Turbolook (M491) Carrera Coupe, then take note. These have begun to come around for sale so rarely that we cannot pass them by regardless of condition. Thankfully this one appears to be in nice shape. This isn’t one of the extremely rare G50-equipped Coupes, but even the earlier models are uncommon enough and desirable enough that I’d expect a lot of interest.

For those unfamiliar, the M491 package gave buyers the option of fitting the 930 rear, suspension, braking, and front and rear spoilers to their standard 3.2 Carrera. Basically you got a 911 Turbo minus the engine. Hence the Turbolook moniker. During its early years on offer the 930 wasn’t available in the US market so the M491 was the closest you could get. Better handling, improved braking, and arguably better looks, but with a less high strung engine. You can see why these have remained very desirable still today.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe – M491 on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1985 Porsche 930 Slantnose

Have you been looking for the most ’80s Porsche you can find? Not just an ’80s model, but one that has taken the extra steps to modify it and add those little details that really showcase the time period? We’ve got just the car for you. Here we have a Black 1985 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe. The Slantnose itself always has been right at home in the ’80s exhibiting the general sense of excess in design with which we’re all familiar from those days. We dealt with the issue of authenticating the Slantnose conversion in our feature of this Slantnose and the issue presents itself again here as well. As the seller notes it isn’t until the ’87MY that these determinations become much easier.

The details don’t stop there though. This is more than just a Slantnose and especially once we step into the interior things really get interesting. The history of how this 930 came to be in its current state are a little fuzzy, but it’s had a good bit of work and houses some nice RUF upgrades. Let’s take a look:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1985 Porsche 930 Slantnose on eBay

1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

I suppose it’s a testament to how much I like the classic 911 that I can spend nearly as much time looking over the details of a 911 like this one as I do with the various exotic, rare, and/or high performance 911s I also feature. As I’ve said before those high-dollar 911s are great and they’re great to look at and ponder, but when it really comes down to a 911 I might enjoy spending a lot of time with I invariably come back to the ’80s.

Whether you prefer the 911SC or the 3.2 Carrera largely is a matter of preference and in many cases can be a matter of availability. The two models share enough useful characteristics that a good one from either model is better than one that’s a little lackluster. There are certainly differences and for those who might want more certainty about its value the later G50-equipped models do make a little more sense. Otherwise, find the one you like! Perhaps this one: a Guards Red 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa, located in Illinois, with Black interior and 47,903 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

Paint-to-Sample 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 C Reutter Cabriolet

It appears my attempt to stay within the realm of good value has only lasted a day. We’ll try again tomorrow. In the meantime here’s something very unique: a paint-to-sample Orange 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 C Reutter Cabriolet. It is said to be the only one produced in this color for the 1965 model year. I can’t confirm that myself, but it is one of only two 356 of any model that I’ve seen painted Orange. The other, while also a Cabriolet, was from 1955 so it certainly doesn’t impact the 1-of-1 status of this 356. It has been fully restored and that eye-popping orange looks stunning on the 356’s curves. There were a good many bright colors available during 356 production, but I don’t think any would be as head turning as this.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 C Reutter Cabriolet on Excellence Magazine

1986 Porsche 930 Coupe

I’ve been on a little bit of a 930 run lately so let’s continue that. This one isn’t a Slantnose, though it does look a little sad. And I mean that in a fully anthropomorphized sense. I think we can see why so many owners replace the standard headlamps. It does have the rear quarter vents and strakes like the Slantnose and it’s when we get into these areas that my interest rises.

This 930 presents us with a little bit of a puzzle. At least, it does if you’re like me and thinking about 911 values and markets and whatnot. The seller goes to great lengths about this being a show car. At first, I wasn’t sure what he was on about and why the insistence on mentioning it. A lot of older 911s and 930s appear at these events. That’s where the puzzle begins: This 930 isn’t in the vain of a SEMA-style show car, but it isn’t a regular 930 either. It’s modifications aren’t hugely significant, but they do seem purposeful and intended to attract a certain level of attention. The mileage is quite low and it looks in really good condition. The show car emphasis then began to make sense to me. The question I wondered: will prospective buyers have a similar level of appreciation?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 930 Coupe on eBay

1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet

I like comparisons. Anyone who has been a reader here long enough will probably know that by now. So to follow upon yesterday’s early Slantnose 930 Coupe we’ll move to the end of the line for a more rare and much more expensive example. And it’s a Cabriolet rather than a Coupe. Sometimes comparisons don’t always go as smoothly as you’d like. Regardless, I find such discussions illuminating. Those on the search for a Slantnose 930 may be interested to know about each of these and their relative characteristics. One might be much more suitable for the collector, while the other more for those looking to spend some time behind the wheel. Truthfully both could make for interesting additions to a collection, but they’re not entirely equal in that regard. I don’t think you’d want to spend too much time driving this one.

With that out of the way let’s look at this car: a paint-to-sample Light Blue Metallic 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet with Linen Grey interior and just 22,502 miles on it. Only 28 930 Cabriolets came equipped with the Slantnose option in 1989 and even fewer of those were paint to sample. A rare 930 indeed.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Cabriolet on Excellence Magazine

1982 Porsche 930 Slantnose

We feature the Slantnose pretty frequently around here. Mostly that’s because I like them a lot – especially the coupes. Most of those, however, come from the final few years of 930 production when the factory M505 option was made available. We definitely always have an eye out for one of the rare, and very valuable, examples from 1989. Of lesser frequency (and I’ll admit we may not have featured one at all) are the earlier Slantnose Turbos from before they were made an official factory option. As the seller of this particular 930 alludes, it isn’t always easy to verify such builds. Given the frequency with which we see aftermarket Slantnose 911s – with sometimes very unreasonable prices and uncertain provenance – it is in many cases best to steer clear.

However, that doesn’t mean we should ignore them altogether. Good ones exist and sometimes we see one that combines that audacious sloping front end with rarely seen colors and a price that doesn’t make us shake our head. I think this one fits that bill: a Chiffon White 1982 Porsche 930 Slantnose, located in California, with Brown leather interior (including factory sport seats) and 83,800 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 930 Slantnose on eBay

Kelly Green 1973 Porsche 911T Targa with 3,369 Miles

Let’s return to the auctions coming up this weekend. When perusing the lots available, it is not uncommon to see a few Porsche 911T peppered in among the many rare and multi-million-dollar cars on offer. Even as the lowest rung on the Porsche ladder, these entry-level examples still show significant appeal. So I wasn’t surprised to see this one. It’s bright exterior attracted my attention immediately. Then I saw the estimate: $220,000-$260,000. For a 911T? What sort of insanity is this?!

It turns out there are a lot of reasons for the very high estimate and while we can never be sure whether such heights actually will be reached I am confident that this will be one of the nicest and most original examples of the 911T that we’ll come across.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Kelly Green 1973 Porsche 911T Targa at Gooding & Co.

1997 Porsche 911 Turbo

A coupe days ago for our feature of this 993 Turbo I spoke about the particular desirability of a black car and specifically why I like them. But what if you want to maintain the darker palette without going the full dark of black? Then this 911 might be more what you’d want. This is an Ocean Blue Metallic 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo, located in California, with tan interior (Cashmere Beige I’d guess) and 77,267 miles on it. Seen out of direct light that Ocean Blue exterior almost will look black, but step closer or add a little sun and that metallic blue paint shines through beautifully to provide just enough differentiation. The black wheels add to the darkly aggressive look. If you don’t like them, have no fear the original wheels come with the car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay