1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera

It feels like it’s been a long time since I posted an early 930. Like many early editions of a model there is a rawness to them not replicated by later versions whose evolutionary changes sought to smooth the rough edges. There are a few currently up for sale, but I’ve featured them previously. Meaning they aren’t selling. That might tell us something about the current market for these Porsches and helps explain why more of them are not coming up for sale. But this is the first I’ve seen of this one.

According to the CoA this is a Platinum Metallic 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera with Cinnamon interior and optional sport seats. It now sits with just 35,770 miles on it. The color combination, especially with the contrasting painted Fuchs wheels, really looks outstanding and the overall condition is promising. Given its age it looks to have been very well cared for.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 930 Turbo Carrera on eBay

Feature Listing: Venetian Blue 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet M491

Turbo-look Carreras are becoming a regular occurrence around here. That’s good! These are some of our favorite of the classic 911s for their combination of 930 appearance, suspension, and braking, but in a little more refined and less high strung a package. They’re also pretty rare. We like rare.

We especially like rare 911s when they are looking their best and have spent a decent bit of time being driven by the owners who derive so much joy from them. Here all of these facets come together in this Venetian Blue Metallic 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with Champagne interior. As I’ve noted with previous M491 Carrera posts, the later ’87-’89 model years represent a special subset of these cars given that they came with the G50 5-speed transmission and that there are fewer of them since the 930 was now back and available for the US market. For some wide-body top-down cruising, this 911 should provide just the thing you’re seeking.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Venetian Blue 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet M491 on Rennlist

1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau

During my time writing about 911s I’m sure I’ve stated that quite a few different models might be my favorite. At one time or another certain cars always strike me and remind me of what it is that I love so much about them. Each model has its strengths and pulls at my imagination in varying ways.

Let it be known that this is my actual favorite model: the 1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau (lightweight). It’s the GT2 before the GT2 existed: a stripped out, higher horsepower, version of the standard 911 Turbo produced in limited numbers. Unlike the later ’94 Turbo S this one is based off of the 964’s original 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-6 and produces 381 hp, an increase of 61 hp over the standard Turbo. Weight savings stripped out nearly 430 pounds.

Visually the Turbo S is distinguished by its unique rear spoiler, Speedline wheels, and rear air inlets. There were 86 in total produced, with 67 of those coming in left-hand drive. The one we see here is even further distinguished by utilizing custom coloring throughout and it sits with a scant 95 km on the clock. Needless to say, this is a very rare opportunity to purchase one of the very rarest high-performance Porsches. It will be up for auction March 9 at the Gooding & Company Amelia Island auctions.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1993 Porsche 911 Turbo S Leichtbau at Gooding & Co.

Motorsports Monday: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS NGT

I’ve got a couple of very interesting and rarely seen 964s to start this week. Both, of course, are fairly expensive (well, in one case very expensive) and both showcase models not originally made available in the US market.

We’ll begin with this: a 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS NGT. Any Porsche enthusiast will be familiar with the Carrera RS. Whether you’re familiar with the 964 Carrera RS or not, the model itself is well known and follows the tried and true formula of combining more power with less weight to produce a wonderful performance-oriented 911. Less familiar is the RS NGT, a model that took the weight loss program of the standard RS a few steps further. So while we might think of the Carrera RS as a track-focused 911 you can enjoy on the street, the NGT really is more of a track car. The interior is fully stripped of all comforts (instead of carpets you get plywood floors!) and a full roll cage welded in place. Additional features like a long-range fuel tank, fire extinguisher, and external cut off further separate these cars from your standard RS. 290 were produced.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS NGT on eBay

1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe – RoW

We’ve seen a decent number of Rest of World 964s come across the market lately. Now that we’ve moved past the 25 year point, that shouldn’t be too surprising given that most of the 964 line fits those parameters and, I think, especially because the Carrera RS now is eligible for import. Almost all have been imported from Japan. Why that is, I’m not really sure (perhaps similar emission equipment makes importation easier?). Also, I’m fairly sure those I have seen all have been the Carrera 2 making this Slate Grey Metallic 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe one of the few exceptions. There is a certain allure that surrounds these cars and I’m not sure if that allure carries over to the Carrera 4 as much as the Carrera 2, but for those looking for the subtle differences from a RoW 964 AND who want all-wheel drive, this one looks like a nice option.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Coupe – RoW on eBay

1967 Porsche 911S Coupe

While the number of 911 models Porsche produces has grown considerably over the years, catering to just about every possible combination you can conceive, a consistent moniker has stood out for those seeking higher performance: the S. Whether the 911S, the Carrera S, the Turbo S, or the various RS models (those count right?) that single letter has let buyers know that it would be a model catering more to their spirited side rather than to comfort. While the S was on hiatus during the late-70s and all of the ’80s it returned in Turbo S form (and Carrera RS form) for the 964 and then finally found itself reattached to the Carrera itself with the Carrera S and 4S, both of which debuted as part of the 993 line. It hasn’t left us since.

But it began here, in 1967, with the 911S. In the ’60s, buyers initially only had access to the base 911. That was it, one choice. In 1967 the lineup expanded with the addition of the 911S and the Soft-window Targa, available both in S trim and without. The S brought with it the sort of features we’d expect: More power (up to 160 hp from the base 911’s 130), upgraded shocks and brakes, along with a rear anti-roll bar and Fuchs wheels. Leatherette on the dash and wheel provided interior upgrades. The 911 had become sportier. And then it wasn’t. For 1968 Porsche gave us the 911L and removed the S from the US lineup. Thankfully, 1969 saw its return, now placed above the entry-level 911T and mid-grade 911E, and all 911s had a longer wheelbase.

That makes the one-year-only short-wheelbase 911S a pretty special car and here we find one for sale: an Irish Green 1967 Porsche 911S Coupe, located in Washington, with a reported 29,177 miles on it.…

Tuner Tuesday: 1987 RUF BTR

The well worn cliche is that power is intoxicating. While typically that expression is used in reference to abuses by individuals it seems no less applicable to cars. Once you get a taste of a level of acceleration, you begin to want more. And more. And maybe even a little more. Thankfully there exist outlets for such desires; builders who are happy to provide you with completely unnecessary levels of power in our continual pursuit of more. Just bring your wallet.

For your Porsche the name nearly synonymous with the need for extra power is RUF. RUF has been in the game for a long time, producing modified Porsches for 40 years. While in many cases these are conversions where the owner buys a 911 and has RUF parts added by an appropriate installer (or by RUF themselves), RUF also has produced their own builds utilizing nothing more than a Porsche chassis. These cars were badged as a RUF rather than a Porsche and come with a RUF VIN. The one we see most commonly and the one that really got the whole thing started is the BTR. Fitted with a 3.4 liter turbocharged flat-6 mated to a 5-speed manual the BTR was a much more powerful version of the 930 capable of outclassing most any production car available at the time. Naturally that extra performance along with their relative rarity makes them a highly sought after commodity. Here we have one such beast: a 1987 RUF BTR, located in Virginia, with 37,472 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 RUF BTR on eBay

Polar Silver 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6

I don’t know that this 911 model needs much introduction. It’s a much loved model by writers and readers alike here at GCFSB and I always feel a certain elation when I see another one come up for sale. For those not entirely familiar this is the 964 Turbo 3.6. We might say it’s what the 964 Turbo was supposed to be from the beginning, but it took a few years to come to fruition. It’s not quite the pinnacle of 964 Turbos since that is reserved for this car’s successor – the ultra-rare Turbo S – but I think for many the Turbo 3.6 itself is one of the holy grail cars. And while not cheap you can have one for far less money than a Turbo S. Heck you might be able to have three for less money than a Turbo S!

Here’s an excellent looking example, painted in the fairly rare color of Polar Silver. It’s located in Ohio and sits with 54,960 miles on it. The best part: it’s one of the best prices I’ve seen for a Turbo 3.6 in quite some time.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Polar Silver 1994 Porsche 911 Turbo 3.6 on eBay

1969 Porsche 911E Coupe

It’s tough to tell, but this is a Bahama Yellow 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe. When first looking at it I thought that had to be an error. Or, at least, I thought it wasn’t actually painted Bahama Yellow even if that was its original color. The color looks more like Sand Beige (or something along those lines). As I looked more closely, however, it does appear to be the case that it is Bahama Yellow – the pictures taken inside the garage do a better job of showing the color than the outdoor photos. Bahama Yellow is on the darker side of yellow, though it is by no means a dark color, just darker for yellow. It also has a slight brown tint to it, which helps explain why it might look like a darker version of beige when photographed entirely in the shade. I suppose all of this is to say that this 911 actually is quite a bit better than I initially thought and I initially thought it looked really good!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 911E Coupe on eBay

1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

Just beautiful. I can think of no other appropriate way to describe this Iris Blue Metallic 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe. It isn’t perfect, it isn’t entirely original, nor is it an ultra-low-mileage garage queen. It’s just beautiful.

The version of Iris Blue Porsche gave us in the ’80s – note that it did change dramatically when the color came back in the ’90s – is one of those shades of blue that we’ve seen variants of throughout the 911’s history and it always captivates. It exists on the lighter side of the spectrum, which differentiates it from other great metallic blues like Gemini Blue and Minerva Blue, but it makes no sacrifices to its appearance. For those who are a fan of that lighter shade it makes for a very nice option. On a classic 911 it’s a crowd pleaser.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay