Tuner Tuesday: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet – Ruf CR4 Conversion

It’s generally safe to say that we all like RUF. Their full builds can be spectacular both in appearance and performance, but almost any RUF to wear the badge, or simply share the name, possesses upgrades that make them very desirable. We very rarely see any related to the 964 so when we do come across one it’s always worthwhile to pause and take a closer look.

This is a 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet that was sent off to RUF for a “full” CR4 conversion perhaps around the year 2000. Like many conversions what exactly is meant by “full” might be a matter of debate, but in this case the engine does appear to have been blueprinted by RUF with horsepower now at 330. That engine likely represents what buyers will care most about. From the documentation it looks like the owners of this car purchased it from RUF in May 2000, but it’s not clear when that means the conversion itself actually occurred. Maybe there is other documentation to support that. It then was imported into the U.S. where it has resided ever since.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 4 Cabriolet – Ruf CR4 Conversion on eBay

1978 Porsche 911SC Targa

Earlier in the week I posted a somewhat unusual 911SC Cabriolet. It was unusual because it was a first-year 911SC, when a 911 Cabriolet did not exist. That car obviously would not be for everyone regardless of how unique it might be. But let’s keep our attention on that first year of 911SC production and look at how such a Cabriolet would have begun its life.

This is a Light Blue Metallic 1978 Porsche 911SC Targa, located in New York, with Blue leather interior and 73,071 miles on it. The exterior color is one that brings with it a good deal of refinement and beauty; the interior is a pretty rare color for the time period. Together they make for a somewhat monotone combination, but one that is pretty unique in its own right.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 911SC Targa on eBay

Iris Blue 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo

I’ve mentioned a few times that Iris Blue is one of my favorite Porsche colors on the 3.2 Carrera. This, however, is not that Iris Blue. When the color returned for the 993 it had changed. A lot! I believe for the 993 it was fully referred to as Iris Blue Pearl, while for the 3.2 Carrera it was Iris Blue Metallic. The pearl is much darker and has hints of purple in it. Metallic is a lovely light blue. Both are very pretty – as evidenced by the example we see here – but in very different ways. Iris Blue Metallic pretty much requires sunlight to look its best. Like many lighter shades of blue its full effect can’t be felt in the shade or when not clean. Iris Blue Pearl, on the other hand, appears to show very well in the shade. I would suspect the purple hues would show most pronounced in the sun, while in the shade it simply appears as a deep, rich, blue.

Here where we see it on the curvy, wide, winged lines of this 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo and it really looks phenomenal.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Iris Blue 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo on Rennlist

1991 Porsche 911 Turbo

This Black on Black 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo has been for sale for a few months and I suppose the question is whether it still should be? With the air-cooled market not really blowing anyone’s doors off these days it perhaps is not surprising that no one has taken the plunge with this one. You can find an early 964 Turbo in the low $100Ks. Were this one priced there it obviously no longer would be for sale. Were it priced higher – like the $150K Grand Prix White example I featured not long ago – then I’d suspect it to have little chance of selling. As it stands now, this asking price splits the difference, which given the fairly low mileage is understandable and not at all unreasonable. Is this a sign that the market for these Turbos might be struggling even more? Or is simply a little more patience required?

I don’t know the answer to that right now, but this is a nice example and while not the most exciting color combination it is definitely one that should have broad appeal.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

1978 Porsche 911SC Cabriolet

This 911 is a little bit of an oddity. Those familiar with the 911SC will recognize immediately that this 911 is not original. While Porsche long had been in the business of producing open-top cars, it took nearly 20 years for a true Cabriolet to make its debut for the 911. The 911 Targa had been around since nearly the 911’s inception, but not a Cabriolet. Perhaps Porsche was not confident in the survival of any open-roofed car given increasing safety standards; the short-lived Soft-window Targa was an engineering solution to that problem that quickly was abandoned. Still it wasn’t until 1983 that the first 911 Cabriolet was produced. That means that the car we see here, a 1978 Porsche 911SC Cabriolet, never really existed.

This 911 began as a 911SC Targa and at some point – we are not told when – its owner decided to convert it to a Cabriolet. Why? I don’t know. Perhaps it was done very early before the true SC Cabriolet was released because that’s really what the owner wanted. Or perhaps later for…reasons. Either way this 911 provides the very rare chance to own a first-year 911SC in full open-roof form. Is that something you should aspire to over a standard ’83 911SC Cabriolet? I’m not sure there’s a great reason to do so other than having a 911 that’s very unique. And I’ll admit it does look well executed.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 911SC Cabriolet on eBay

1974 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa

I don’t get to feature these 911s a lot. That is partly due to there not being a ton of them around these days, but also those few that I do see never seem quite right. They’re either not in great condition or simply priced much too high, and while high prices aren’t typically something to dissuade me from writing up an air-cooled Porsche I usually end up passing them by. They just sit in a funny place in the market.

This one doesn’t seem to possess those issues, though even here where the price is at least somewhat reasonable I think it makes for a pretty tough sell. Here we have a Grand Prix White 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa with Midnight leatherette interior and a reported 68,124 miles on it. These U.S market 2.7-liter Carreras must be distinguished from their much more expensive European counterparts, which shared their MFI engine with the 1973 Carrera RS. Those 911s were basically a Carrera RS Touring with impact bumpers. These 911s are not quite that. However, that lack of a shared pedigree means prices are far lower and while their collector potential also is a good bit lower, pricing is at least such that they can make for a worthwhile consideration for those who desire a ’70s 911.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera Targa on eBay

1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

Rubystone Red (Sternrubin) might be the most love/hate of the well known Porsche colors. I imagine there are colors within Porsche’s extensive catalog that have been less liked overall, but those colors disappear rarely to be asked for again. Rubystone, while we don’t see it very often, does still come around as a PTS option on modern 911s, especially on the limited production high performance models like the GT3 RS and 911 R. And when it does it looks just as stunning as it did upon its debut. A lot of buyers might not like it, but whatever its qualities, on cars that deserve a bold attention-grabbing color it’s a color that performs exactly that function.

Of course, it was on just such a model that it debuted: the 964 Carrera RS. We did not get the Carrera RS in the US market, but rather had to settle for the more tame RS America. With the passing of time it is now legal to import the true Carrera RS and we’ve seen quite a few over the past year or so. Here we have another one, fully restored and looking nearly immaculate, in that eye-popping color of Rubystone Red.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on eBay

1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe

I am going to return here to a long time favorite of mine: a Slate Grey Metallic 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe with only 23,863 miles on it. Here the Slate Grey Metallic exterior, which is the part of this 964 I most strongly prefer, is contrasted with a Linen interior. I’m not sure I’ve come across a similar example. Most have had Burgundy interiors. If I’m honest, I prefer the Burgundy, but there is something about the brightness conveyed by this Linen interior and I can see how it would be appealing. And unlike many of the Linen interiors we see on either a Cabriolet or a Targa this Coupe should be a little easier to keep clean since it is more insulated from the elements. Both exterior and interior look in nice shape and I think this looks like a nice early 964.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Porsche 911 Carrera 2 Coupe on eBay

1959 Porsche 356A 1600 Reutter Coupe

I want to turn back the clock from yesterday’s very pretty Aetna Blue over Bordeaux Carrera 4S to see a somewhat similar early example of that color combination. Admittedly, the comparison here isn’t exact since the colors are not precisely the same, but I think we still get a sense of the way these colors work on a vintage Porsche and a sense of the inspiration for that modern example. Here we have a Meissen Blue 1959 Porsche 356A 1600 Reutter Coupe, located in Houston, with a Red leatherette interior. On this 356 the shade of blue is a little lighter and the shade of red is a little brighter. Nonetheless, we end up with an equally pretty Porsche and one that surely would be a prized part of any collection.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1959 Porsche 356A 1600 Reutter Coupe on Classic Driver

1965 Porsche 356C Cabriolet

I’m going to continue with my sunny weather open-top motoring theme and have a couple interesting Porsches to look at highlighting the full breadth of the Porsche range. Whether you want classic or modern, supercar performance or backroad cruiser, there’s probably a Porsche out there to suit your needs.

The one we see here, a Dolphin Grey 1965 Porsche 356C Cabriolet, is going to stretch the bounds of reasonableness when it comes to price, but for those seeking the truest sense of the vintage Porsche experience there may be few better options. This 356, which comes very late in the model’s production, is said to be in entirely original condition showcasing wholly original paint and interior. While I’m not sure it’s spent its whole life with one owner it does sound like its original owner possessed it until very recently.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 Porsche 356C Cabriolet on eBay