1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

Ask a gaggle of Porsche enthusiasts what they would consider the most iconic production Porsche and you’ll likely get a small variety of answers. But one of those possibilities is almost certainly a version of the car seen here, the 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS. Built to satisfy homologation requirements so that Porsche could compete in Group 4 racing, the Carrera RS was an instant success, more than tripling the necessary 500 model production run. Offered in both Lightweight and Touring trim, the RS combined increased engine output with lower weight and improved aerodynamics to push the performance envelope and provide its owners with the ultimate road-going Porsche of the day. The example we see here is a fully restored 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Touring that has received engine work from Kremer Racing to increase displacement from the standard 2.7 liters to a full 3.0 liter flat-6. The Kremer brothers were a well established Porsche racing team who went on to win the 1979 24 Hrs of Le Mans at the wheel of their Kremer Porsche 935.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on Hemmings Motor News

1975 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

I typically don’t like to feature modified Porsches and try to focus on original cars, especially when it comes to the air-cooled 911. I’m making an exception in this case for a couple of reasons: first, the modifications here are not extensive, everything is tasteful and keeping within the spirit of the car. Second, the seller appears to have a very good knowledge, and detailed inventory, of all recent work done to the car and possesses most of the original parts should a buyer desire to return the car to its original state. Last, the 1974-1977 Carrera is not nearly as desirable, at least at the moment, as the rest of the air-cooled 911 model range so this is not the sort of car where collector status need be of much concern. Here we have a 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe in Black with Gold script/accents, located in California, with a little over 147K miles. In 1974 Porsche modified the original design of the 911 in order to meet more stringent impact requirements and also raised displacement from 2.4 liters to 2.7 liters. That lay-out remained mostly unchanged for the 1975 model year and then in 1976 displacement again was increased to 3.0 liters. This would then lead us into the era of the 911SC and the establishment of the 911 as a Porsche icon.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1975 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

1971 Porsche 911T

For any buyer hoping to own a long-hood 911 for the lowest cost there are two primary options (excluding the option of buying a car in serious need of restoration). The first is to forgo the plan of getting a 911 at all and find an excellent 912 instead. Same basic design and layout, but with a flat-4 rather than a flat-6. The other option is to spend a bit more money and find a well maintained 911T. The 911T effectively became Porsche’s entry-level model once 912 production was ceased and both models offered similar levels of performance and refinement, especially when viewed through the lens of a modern automobile. For the 1970 and 1971 model years the 911 featured a 2.2 liter flat-6 engine delivering power to the rear wheels via a standard 4-speed or optional 5-speed manual transmission. The example featured here in a very period-correct Olive Green is a 1971 Porsche 911 T, located in Miami, with the more desirable 5-speed manual transmission.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 Porsche 911T on eBay

1996 Porsche 911 C4S

I should probably just admit it to myself: I drive a black car, it blends in fairly well with everything else, but I am a sucker for certain colors, especially certain bright colors, and always find myself taking a 2nd or 3rd look at the listing for a car painted in a hue that we would never refer to as subtle. C’est la vie. Here we have a low-mileage Arena Red 1996 Porsche 911 C4S that is located in Colorado. The C4S made its debut with the 993 and featured lowered suspension, Turbo brakes, and the wider rear bodywork of the Turbo, all packaged around Porsche’s all-wheel-drive system. For buyers who wished to forgo the high-stressed forced induction of the 993 Turbo, the 993 C4S offered an alternative that was dynamically similar though in naturally-aspirated form. While certainly not as highly regarded as a 993 Turbo on the current market, the C4S still holds its own and is sure to command excellent value over the years to come.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1996 Porsche 911 C4S on eBay

2007 Porsche 911 Turbo

With the introduction of the 991 series 911, one of the more talked about points was the fact that the 911 GT3 would be equipped solely with the PDK dual clutch gearbox. Purists cried foul, but the more progressive minded enthusiasts began to wonder if we have reached the point where the manual gearbox has been soundly surpassed by the automatic and automated manual gearboxes. Looking solely at the statistics, it appears the answer is “yes.” This 2007 Porsche 911 Turbo is for sale from our friends at Sun Valley Auto Club in Hailey, Idaho. For some, being equipped with the Tiptronic gearbox might be a vex, but however you slice it, this is still a seriously fast performance vehicle capable of forging long-lasting road trip memories.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Porsche 911 Turbo at Sun Valley Auto Club

1979 Porsche 930

Let’s try this again: the Porsche 930 we posted on Thursday sold right around the time our post went up, so perhaps this one will remain on auction slightly longer. Here we have a Sahara Diamond Metallic 1979 Porsche 930, located in Maryland, with only 30,813 miles (the seller’s statement that the color is Kunstharzlack is incorrect – that just means the paint is a synthetic enamel). A rare and period-correct color such as this one does not come around too often and with such low mileage there is sure to be a lot of attention paid to this particular car.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1979 Porsche 930 on eBay

1978 Porsche 930

What happened to Guards Red? I know the color still exists, though I think the shade has changed slightly over the years, but I cannot remember the last time I actually saw a red 911 on the road. We have come across, and featured, quite a few Guards Red 911s here at GCFSB as it seems to have been a very popular choice in the ’80s. It is rare, however, that we have featured a modern 911, especially one of the water-cooled models, in Guards Red. It isn’t a subtle shade so I understand why some buyers might hesitate, but it isn’t Signal Orange or Viper Green either. I guess I just find this curious since I see a variety of red cars every day. I bring this up only because I really enjoy the color combination we see here. A Guards Red 1978 Porsche 930 with Tan leather interior. On the exterior, Guards Red contrasts so well with the black trim and wheels of the 930, but then the lighter Tan interior provides a more open, airy, feel that really looks great. This particular 930, located in Idaho, has just under 70K miles and is on auction with no reserve.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Porsche 930 on eBay

1983 Porsche 911SC Sunroof Coupe

I was hoping to feature a few Porsches this week that represented nice value, but when I saw this one I just couldn’t pass it by. Here we have a Ruby Red Metallic 1983 Porsche 911SC, located in Massachusetts, with Burgundy leather interior (a fantastic color combination) and only 32,380 miles. The SC was the 911 model that really cemented the legacy of this iconic sports car and insured Porsche would continue to produce it to this day. By modern standards the performance from the 3.0 liter flat-6 isn’t going to knock your socks off, but the classic 911 design has aged rather gracefully and these cars still provide the feel and connectedness that so many drivers crave.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Porsche 911SC Sunroof Coupe on eBay

1986 Porsche 911 Turbo

Every time I see one of these cars I remember why I love them. By appearance the 930 is very clearly a car from the ’80s and it should make no apologies for that fact. Every angle provides an interesting perspective that showcases the 911’s iconic shape. Add on an interesting exterior color, such as the White Gold Metallic of the car seen here, and you can linger over its curves for quite some time. This 1986 Porsche 911 Turbo appears to have had a peculiar beginning to its life (more on that below), but after that it seems to have been a well-driven 930, which had an engine rebuild at just over 100K miles performed by Andial.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Porsche 911 Turbo on eBay

1989 Porsche 911 Carrera

There has been a decent bit of discussion lately concerning the current prices for air-cooled 911s and whether they’re being over valued. Much of that discussion has been concerned with a variety of rare variants that have seen very high prices. We might then wonder about the standard 3.2 Carrera and whether those prices too have shot up. The short answer is yes. The car featured here should provide us with a reasonable barometer of the current market for a classic 911 from the ’80s. Here we have a Black on Black 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera, located in New York, which has seen 57,000 miles. The value of this particular 911 should be buoyed by a couple of factors: 1) it comes from the final year of classic 911 production so it will be as refined as these cars get, including possessing the very desirable G50 5-speed manual transmission and 2) it has the factory sport seats.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera on eBay