Avant-garde: 1995 Audi S6 Avant Roundup

In the U.S., few Audi models have quite such a devoted following as the 1995 S6 Avant. Not many were imported, and those that were generally have been snapped up by enthusiasts and had miles piled on to them. Some have succumbed to accidents or been organ donors, leaving even fewer on the road 20 years later. However, we have 4 today available – amazingly all in different colors. Which would be the one you would choose? Let’s start with an Emerald Green Mica example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Audi S6 Avant on eBay

1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro

The less glamorous version of what was a fantastic chassis and engine combination, the Audi 4000 quattro brought rally-bred performance to the masses. You really could think of it as the original “WRX” because while the big-brother Quattro that stole all of the headlines in its day is currently a reasonably good value compared to some of its contemporaries, when they were new the turbocharged, box-flared brother was simply out of reach of most enthusiasts. Original sticker price of the Quattro put it around the same price as a well-equipped Porsche 911; equivalent today to a base model R8. It was therefore very exciting to see a nearly identical drivetrain layout passed down to the more pedestrian sedan version, complete with a similar-sounding inline-5 and locking differentials. You got all of this in a slick-looking 4-door package for around $20,000 – not cheap, mind you, but half the price of the Quattro. For many fans of the Quattro package, it proved to be legendary in its own right:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi 4000CS Quattro on eBay

1987 Audi Coupe Quattro

Thought they recently have surpassed the 25 year importation boycott into the United States, it’s not likely that you’re ever going to see many of this model car on these shores. Sure, there’s a group of Audi enthusiasts who are particularly excited when they see a B2 Coupe Quattro pop up for sale – a truly rare event in the U.S.. However, clean models demand a serious premium because of their rarity – a premium which pushes them squarely into the price point of the turbocharged, box flared big brother. Though the drivetrains are for the most part the same, the addition of the turbo, bigger wheels and flares changes the category of ownership from neat footnote to headline splash. As such, it’s understandable why the Coupe Quattro is such as niche vehicle. Nevertheless, it’s really neat to see one for sale in the U.S., and this occasion is no different.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Audi Coupe Quattro on craigslist

1984 Audi Quattro

To me, it’s pretty amazing that the Quattro hasn’t really received the attention of the E30 M3. The Quattro beat the M3 to the market by 6 years with its squared, chunky boxflare stance. It was all-wheel drive, turbocharged and cutting edge. It revolutionized the World Rally Championship and firmly cemented Audi in the halls of motorsports and enthusiasts minds. The offbeat 5-cylinder hanging in front of the wheels seemed an odd choice, but Audi has returned with an updated version of that power plant in some of its newer models, and the sound and performance is no less memorable than it was in the original. Indeed, in terms of what a single car did for a brand, the Quattro was much more influential for Audi than the E30 M3 was for BMW in my mind. Yet today, if you want to get a great condition E30 M3 with under 100,000 miles you’re looking at over $50,000 to play; if you want to get into the original Quattro, nice examples can be had for half that amount:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Audi Quattro on eBay

1982 Audi Coupe GT with 57,000 Miles

I’ve made it no secret that I’m a big fan of the Audi Coupe GT; obviously, it helps that I own one that I’ve had for a few decades now. They’re stellar and underrated cars, forgotten by German car enthusiasts at large they remain one of the best unsung grand touring cars of the 1980s. While not the fastest or flashiest car out there, the GT provided a good amount of luxury and isolation, but brought with it a good dose of sport to back up the DNA links to motorsport and its big-brother Quattro. The GT was a car that gave you 80% of the performance of the turbocharged model for half the price. It also, in my mind, looked great too – while we all love boxflares, like the non-M3 E30s the GT had a charm of its own. The great angular yet curved C-pillar was the best design feature in my mind and still looks great today. For a car that shared a majority of its components with the 4000 model, the GT was remarkably different in character. However, as they were generally forgotten it is exceedingly difficult to find good examples of the B2 Coupes in general, and especially the first run of the cars. Distinctive with their DOT-spec diving board bumpers and quad-headlight setup with flat grill, these GTs have a loyal following – and one of the best examples from what was clearly a loving home is up for sale today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Audi Coupe GT on eBay

1992 Audi V8 quattro 6-Speed

Fans of the Audi V8, rejoice! I know there are a few more than just me out there and we always love seeing a clean example of one of the best bits of Audi engineering in history. Sure, there are more significant Audi models, but the V8 certainly deserves to be amongst the top 5. Many view it as an overly complicated, underpowered car – and indeed, in 3.6 automatic form as it was originally received in the U.S., the V8 felt a bit flat. But let’s not forget that Audi reinvigorated what was already an aging chassis to make it feel remarkably fresh. They brought for the first time an automatic gearbox to all-wheel drive, opening an entirely new market share for Audi and making a real contender in the large executive market. But for motorsport fans, the real meat of the Audi V8 meal was the sporting potential of the manual models. It’s often overlooked, but the V8 was a remarkable performer, especially in manual 4.2 version. Today’s example doesn’t have that magical setup, but even in less powerful 3.6 form the car was plenty potent when tied to a 6-speed manual:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi V8 quattro 6-speed on mobile.de

Wednesday Wheels Roundup

It’s been a little while since we did a wheels post, but I wanted to get back into the swing of things. Here are a few compelling sets I found this week – they all look like pretty good deals if you’re looking for some wheels either set your ride apart or return it to a factory appearance:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: MSW 15×7 4×100 Wheels on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1992 Audi S4

If you missed out on last week’s S-Fest II, have no fear. Our reader John has been on patrol and recently sighted this great looking 1992 Audi S4. The 1992 has some nice advantages in stock form over the later run cars; however, this particular example has been further modified with turned up boost, suspension and some European market goodies. In rarer-to-see black over grey leather, it looks like a pretty tidy package:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Audi S4 on craigslist

Motorsport Mondays: 2007 Audi A4 DTM R13

From arguably what was the weakest motorsport background of the major German automobile manufacturers in the 1970s, Audi and the Volkswagen group have grown into what is undoubtedly the most active and diverse in the past 30 years. It’s funny, too – since, generally speaking, most enthusiasts would place Porsche and BMW ahead of Audi with sporting credentials; but then, just cover the amount of racing that the Volkswagen Audi Group are involved in. Most notable would probably the 13th victory in 15 years for Audi racing the 24 Hours of Le Mans – an incredible feat and precariously close to the all time record of 16 victories by Porsche. Then there are the R8 customer racing programs and Audis involvement in the DTM since the 1980s. Though Audi dropped out of the Rally scene that bore the legend of Quattro, Volkswagen is no slouch either having won the WRC title last year. Volkswagen also runs a one-off Scirocco cup in addition to Formula 3, Dakar and Global Rallycross efforts. Bentley is still on the radar as well, having also won the 24 Hours of Le Mans and is now racing Porsches and Ferraris with their new GT3 racer. Lamborghini, though not often associated with motorsport ironically, also has a one-off series called the Super Trofeo and previously ran in GT1 as well. And let’s not forget that Audi also owns Ducati, one of the most famous racing names in the motorcycle world. All in all, then, there aren’t many manufacturers that come close to the level of corporate involvement that the Volkswagen group engages in. One of my favorites until fairly recently was the German Touring Car series, more commonly referred to by with German ackronym DTM – Deutsche Tourenwagen Meistershaft, and since 1996 the Audi A4 has been a lead contender:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2007 Audi A4 DTM on race-cars.com

1986 Audi Coupe GT

Do you think you know Audi and Volkswagen products from the 1980s well? There are a lot of people who claim to, but it seems that at times even VAG didn’t know what it was producing. Take, for example, this 1986 Audi Coupe GT. Now, according to most sources for a long time, if you wanted to get the digital dashboard in a 1986 Audi Coupe GT, you had to get the “Commemorative Edition” GT which came only in white or graphite. Yet as the owner of what was originally a Oceanic Blue non-CE Audi GT with an original digital dashboard, I can attest that in fact cars outside of the normal production run were fitted with the somewhat quirky bit of 1980s fad technology. If you talk to most Audi folks, they stand firmly in two camps. The small camp says that the digital dash is really, really cool; the far larger camp sees it as a glitchy gimmick that seldom works properly and is hard to service. But having owned one for the best part of two decades now, I can say mine has never experienced much of an issue. It had neat features, such as the “shut off the entire dash” feature which left you only with a speed reading. I think I used it once, only to show someone that it existed. At startup, you could tell your friends that you had programmed the cover art to Ghost in the Machine by The Police into your dash. Much more fun, though, was the ability on the fly to switch the dash from English to Metric units; if you were alone on the highway with an unsuspecting passenger, you could flip the dash into metric and then brag about how you were going “150” with ease. Okay, maybe I was the only one who thought it was funny, but there really weren’t many advantages to the digital dash otherwise.…