Barn Find: 1972 Mercedes-Benz 280SE

For every 1938 Bugatti Type 57C Atalante Coupe that Wayne Carini finds in barn, there are hundreds of other cars sitting in barns — usually for a reason. The thing about the barn find is that the hunt is usually the best part. Once you actually find the car, reality sets in and your left with a ton of unknowns with maybe a handful of logistical issues. It’s tough to separate the emotions of finding a gem and really stepping back and thinking through whether or not you should actually buy a barn find car. This 1972 Mercedes-Benz 280SE in a barn outside of Jackson, Mississippi isn’t a ’38 Bugatti but it’s not exactly a Chevy Chevette either. So lets take a look to see if this W108 is worth saving.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1972 Mercedes-Benz 280SE on Jackson, MS Craigslist

Year: 1972
Model: 280SE
Engine: 2.8 liter inline-6
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 81,288 mi
Price: $5,000

$5000 OR BEST CASH OFFER WILL GET IT!!!
True Barn Find! Discovered in an abandoned shop, this beauty has been untouched for over 20 years! It will be sold AS IS, where is, and you must arrange for your own pickup. Inspection before purchase is welcome, but remember this is an AS IS auction, and there will be no refunds after the sale. It appears to be complete, and all original untouched not restored. The only visible flaw is the front driver side headlight casing is missing, see pics.
We have not attempted to start the vehicle, but I’m certain it won’t take but a simple service to fire it up. We were told by the family that owned the property, that the owner passed away some time ago, and his children left it untouched as you see it.

1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

You might of heard the story of the Colorado man who had a little affinity for Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3s. (You can read the story here if not.) I understand where this man was coming from because if you really like something, go get four more of them. In his case, the M100 powered W109 just happened to do it for him and I don’t blame him one bit. Now that all five of these 6.3s have been saved and rejuvenated, one of them is up for adoption. Unfortunately, though, the adoption fee is quite steep.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on Hemmings

Roll the Dice? 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3

Every time I see a car that is usually expensive, selling for a price that is inexplicably inexpensive, the gears in my head start turning. Could I buy this one on the cheap, fix it up and perhaps not lose money on it? Better yet – could I buy it, not do a thing, let it sit and probably not lose money on it? Thank goodness I physically can’t fit another vehicle in my garages and driveway because when I see cars like today’s, those damn gears start moving.

The W109 300SEL 6.3 has quickly become a collector car that everyone in the Mercedes circles are rushing to snag up. Prices have been going up at an alarming rate thanks to folks like Jay Leno proclaiming his love for it.  I understand where he’s coming from because the 6.3, in my opinion, is one of the finest sedans Mercedes has ever made. It’s also generally considered one of the first “super sedans” – the prototype for not only later AMG models, but cars like the M5. Sticking the M100 V8 into the handsome W109 body and building it to a standard of above average durability and reliability made this car a winner the day it left the factory. The only problem was all the greatness is that it costs a lot of money upfront and even more to maintain at a reasonable level. This is where some solid math skills and judging your mechanical ability come into play when deciding whether to take the plunge on a project like this 1969 6.3 up for bid in Eastern, Pennsylvania.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Mercedes-Benz 300SEL 6.3 on eBay

Barn Find: 1971 Porsche 911T

We’ve shown a couple of cars like this one recently: Porsches from the ’70s that are in need of a lot of love so that they can be enjoyed again. The Heap of the Week I featured a couple of weeks ago would have been more suited for a full restoration seeking collector status. That car is remarkably similar to the car featured here and this one should probably be approached with a similar ideal. Here we have a Red 1971 Porsche 911T located in Maryland, just outside of Washington, DC.

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Year: 1971
Model: 911T
Engine: 2.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 71,395 mi
Price: No Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 Porsche 911T on EBay

You are bidding on a 1971 911T 5-speed coupe w/o sunroof. It was manufactured 10/70. This is a “behind-the-barn” find that shows the results of being left out in the elements for too long. The car is all original and intact with 71,395 miles with matching numbers. Original color was Pastel Blue #2020 but now has a poor repaint to red. This car will require extensive restoration. The lower portions of the front pans have extensive rust. Full replacement of the front pans, right and left battery boxes, gas tank (?) and forward portion of the floor pans is required. The structure and pans to the rear of the mid-point, torsion tubes, shock mounts, etc. are clean and rust-free. Rockers show some minor rust, but seem to be intact. Rocker trim is S type. Door jambs, hinge mountings and surrounds are intact and still serve up that Porsche “ping” when closed. Headlight bowls are intact and are not rusted. All glass is original and present with some slight delamination showing in the front windshield. Some rust is present in the body panels as shown in the photos; the underside trailing edge of the rear deck lid is the worst.

Heap of the Week: 1973 Audi 100 Coupe S

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If last week’s “Heap of the Week” Karmann Ghia T34 was a great restoration candidate because of it’s rarity, today’s 1973 Audi 100 Coupe S is as much deserving of that if not more. Luckily for you, if you’re interested in one of these cars and a restoration project, step one (take apart and turn it into an unrecognizable heap of parts) is already done for you! Completely stripped and ready for body work, this car appears to be a solid platform for a build – something that’s hard to say of any earlier Audi due to rust issues. You’d also be building what is decidedly the most rare post-war Audi in the United States, with only 5 known of here. Get out your elbow grease then for today’s Heap of the Week:

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Year: 1973
Model: 100 Coupe S
Engine: 1.9 liter inline-4
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: N/A mi
Price: $2,000

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Audi 100 Coupe S on Audifans.com

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1973 Audi 100 Coupe S. 1 of 5 in the US. Was brought to the US in about 1976 and has not been on the road since the early to mid 80s. The car is 98% complete. What is missing that I know of are the windshield, headliner, carpet and engine mounts. The body is remarkably solid with only a minimal amount of surface rust due to the car sitting in primer for at least the past 5 years. The unibody and all bolt on parts are very solid and there are no rust holes on the vehicle. Will need some more body work before painting. I believe the original color is marathon blue. This car also has a manual (crank operated) retractable sunroof which was apparently a rather rare option. Engine is 100 HP I4 carbbed pushrod engine.

1968 Porsche 911S Coupe Barn find

In the early 60’s the 356 was nearing the end of its life, and was starting to be considered antiquated. Enter the 911, Porsche had developed a totally new GT car that was the higher evolution of the 356, but did everything just a tick better. With more interior room, better handling, and more power the 911 took Porsche to the next level. In the ‘60’s the highest evolution of the 911, was the 911S. In 1968, the 911S was not available to the US market, making these cars very rare on our shores.

This barn find for sale in San Francisco, CA is an example of an all original ’68 short wheel base 911S, and a rough one at that.

1968 Porsche 911S Coupe Barnfind on pelicanparts.com

Rare numbers matching 1968 Porsche 911S Coupe. A true California barn find hidden away for many years. A rare Euro only model and 1 of only 227 produced. A California car, since early 1970’s. Original Burgundy Red color. Odometer showing 80,170 kilometers. Original 2.0 liter 911S engine number . Very rare original Sportomatic transmission. The value of the short wheelbase 911S is rising rapidly. $24,995 obo.

No one can deny that barn finds are cool, it’s any car guys dream to be the one that exhumes a piece of automotive history from some old timer’s garage that is just the way it was when it was tucked away decades ago. I for one fantasize about it every time I’m on a road trip in the country. The more you watch the market, the more popular these types of cars are becoming, but where’s the line between barn find, and lost relic? To me the quintessential barn find has 3 major elements, originality, collectability, and preservation. While original, and collectable this car lacks the one element that I would consider to be the most important in a barn find; preservation.…