Roll the Dice Again? 1965 NSU Sport Prinz

With the burgeoning economic boom of the late 1950s (Adenauer’s ‘Economic Miracle’ in West Germany), many companies tried to capitalize on the success of the middle class by introducing swankier, more stylish versions of their economic models. The hope was that these cars would be expressions of wealth and signature models. To greater or lesser extent, the three that were developed around the same time – Volkswagen’s Karmann Ghia, BMW’s 700 Coupe and NSU’s Sport Prinz – were all relatively well received in the marketplace, though of the three only the Karmann Ghia had mass appeal. That was interesting, as the Sport Prinz offered a slightly different take on rakish Italian lines with pedestrian German underpinnings. Introduced for 1960, the Sport Prinz was built on the Prinz III chassis, a diminutive, air-cooled rear-engine inline-2 economy “sedan”. To take the Prinz upmarket, like Volkswagen NSU turned to Italy. Instead of Ghia or BMW’s choice of Michelotti, though, NSU enlisted famed Bertone in Turin and the designer Franco Scaglione. The resulting design was significantly more dramatic than the Prinz, with long overhands, a swoop roofline and tail fins hinting at greater GT speed. As with the others though, the Sport Prinz offered no performance gain, but at least came to market slightly under the price of the more famous Karmann Ghia, at around $2,400 – top for the NSU lineup in the early 1960s.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 NSU Sport Prinz on eBay

Couple of Swedish Coupes: 1987 Volvo 780 & 1991 Volvo Coupé

You wouldn’t know it from looking at the current product portfolio, but Volvo carried a bit of a staid image up to and around the turn of the millennium, with 90 degree angles and boxy styling ruling the day. The cars had their following though, with a reputation for safety and reliability unmatched by almost every other manufacturer in the world. Looking back on Volvo’s history, there were a few flash in the pan moments in terms of styling, such as the P1800ES, the 480 and these cars we see here, the 780 and Coupe. Essentially the same car, Volvo decided to produce an encore to the chopped top 262C, employing Bertone once again to have their hand at a two-door version of the 700 series. Just over 8,500 examples were produced from 1986 to 1991, with the final year seeing a name change to “Coupé.” We’ll start off this Double Take by looking at a 1987 780, with the venerable 2.8 liter V6 engine.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Volvo 780 on eBay

1965 BMW 3200CS Bertone

As BMW ramped up with some new models at the beginning of the 1960s, they were winding down with others. The car you see here represented the end of an era at BMW. The 3200CS Bertone had roots that could be traced back to the BMW 501 of the early 1950s. This was a rather rudimentary car by BMW standards, even of the 1960s, with a body on frame construction, an overhead valve V8 and shock of shocks, a live rear axle. Fewer than 1,000 were ever built and today, these Bertone coupes are extremely rare and sought after. This 3200CS Bertone is currently on offer in southwest Germany.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 BMW 3200CS Bertone on Mobile.de

1965 BMW 3200CS

In the early 1960s, the BMW lineup was a bit of a mash up of bubble cars, luxury coupes and saloons and the recently introduced, rear engined 700. The 3200CS was the final vehicle to be built on BMW’s large car platform, which traced its beginning back to 1951 with the introduction of the 501, or “Baroque Angel” as it was also known. Designed by Bertone, the 3200CS is a car which clearly represents the roots of modern BMW styling, with the Hofmeister kink on the C-pillar and low belt line. It was also the last BMW engine to feature pushrod activated valves. Few of these coupes exist to this day, and this restored example for sale in California is a rare chance to get one in near perfect condition.

Year: 1965
Model: 3200CS
Engine: 3.2 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: 50,048 mi
Price: $199,900 Buy It Now

1965 BMW 3200CS on eBay

The BMW 3200CS was the first to wear the CS or Coupe Sport moniker and featured the latest high-performance V-8. It was constructed in partnership with Bertone, who both designed and built the body. The 3200CS was unveiled at the 1961 Frankfurt Motor Show and the first cars were delivered in February 1962. The stunning bodywork introduced many styling cues that were seen on later models such as the slim roof section, round taillights with central indicators and distinctive C pillar kink.

Aimed at a select clientele, the high-fashion CS was priced at $7,500 and was often made to suit customer specifications. BMW soon realized that complications arising from the hand-built bodies, plus the tremendous success of their other models made the Bertone coupe too expensive and stopped production after only 603 were built. The 3200 was the last remnant of BMW’s luxury V-8’s, but the beautiful model left its mark on virtually every future coupe, with its timeless styling and exclusive appeal.