2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder

One last car without a fixed roof. Moving ahead 50 years from the 356C Cabriolet I featured over the weekend we come to possibly the best of Porsche’s open-top machines. From my first glimpse I immediately loved the new design of the 981 Boxster and Cayman when each debuted. While I’d generally liked the Cayman from its inception I cannot say the same of the Boxster. I was fine with it, but I can’t say it ever really wowed me. That feeling remained fairly constant throughout its first 15 years of production until the 981. Porsche finally seemed to have gotten things right. This new design struck the right balance between aggressive styling and elegant looks. It’s a modern Porsche so it shouldn’t be too shouty, but it also should make clear its sporting aspirations.

Like with the Cayman GT4, Porsche also allowed the Boxster to borrow a 3.8 liter flat-six engine from the 911 for the Boxster Spyder. Gone are much of the Boxster’s criticisms about a general lack of performance. 375 horsepower tends to help with that. So does a well-balanced mid-engine chassis with the power directed to the rear. The Boxster always has had a pretty good chassis. Now it had a complementary engine.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder at Euroclassics Porsche

Double Take: Choose Your Blue – 2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder

I’ve periodically had my eye out for the latest Porsche Boxster Spyder to feature. They don’t come up for sale all that often and most times when searching I have come up empty. The few times I have come across one it either sold very quickly or I came across an auction just prior to its end. My luck has finally come good.

The Spyder is the Boxster version of the Cayman GT4 and each serves as the swan song for these naturally aspirated Porsches. Like the GT4 it borrows its 3.8-liter engine from the 911 and in this form produces a nice 375 hp all routed to the rear wheels through a 6-speed manual transmission. For me it’s also the best looking Boxster Porsche has produced thus far.

Here not only have I finally found a Spyder I like, but I found two of them! Obviously, they had to be featured together. Both are paint-to-sample non-metallic blues and are very bright. I ran a similar feature a while back with two PTS GT3 RS in blue and now we turn to another of Porsche’s limited-production models. The overall spec of these Spyders is pretty similar so really it all comes down to the exterior: Voodoo Blue or Mexico Blue. Which to have?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Voodoo Blue 2016 Porsche Boxster Spyder on Rennlist

2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder

I write-up a lot of Porsches, but very rarely post about the Boxster. And most of those very infrequent examples are of the Boxster Spyder. So it probably shouldn’t come as a surprise that this Boxster post also is a Spyder.

Given that I actually am a big fan of the roadster genre it’s a little strange that I don’t feature the Boxster more often. After all, I own a 2-seat convertible and I love it. These are cars that tend to be light and nimble, almost always rear-wheel drive and with a manual transmission. And while they rarely have been the most powerful cars on the market there’s typically enough power on tap to get some serious enjoyment out of it.

The Boxster, being a Porsche, has long been one of the more luxurious roadsters on the market. It’s also suffered seemingly endless criticism for basically being not as good as a 911. Whether it was the nature of the car or simply a function of purposeful decision-making by those at Porsche, the early models probably could have been sportier. Over time those criticisms either have dwindled as the Boxster was made a better and more powerful car or they shifted to the Cayman where the “not as good as a 911” remarks make more sense.

The Spyder, released by Porsche for the 2011 model year, sought to solve most of the criticisms through the tried-and-true performance method: remove weight (a 176 pound reduction) and add power (up to 320 hp, 10 more than the Boxster S). In a roadster this is an especially important formula since the entire experience was to center on no frills sporting from the outset. The Spyder does that very well.

Here we have one of the rarely seen color options: a Guards Red 2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder, located in Texas, with 50,391 miles on it.…

Double Take: 1995 Porsche 968 6-speed

A few weeks ago, I took a look at a trio of Porsche 968 6-speeds. One was a rare 1995 model; only 259 were sold from that model year. As is often the case with 968 Coupe 6-speeds, the asking prices of two of the three were quite high and they still linger on the market, unsurprisingly. Well, today we have another double take of ’95 specific 6-speeds – how do they measure up to the last three we looked at?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 968 Coupe on eBay

2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder – REVISIT

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The 2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder we featured back in November remains up for sale. I said in my original feature that the price appeared to be on the high end, but this seller has ignored that – while also ignoring that previous ads have failed to result in a sale – and raised the asking price of this Boxster by an additional $1K. It’s a bold strategy. Let’s see if it pays off.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site November 24, 2015:

2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder

We know that Porsche likes to remember its successes. And, of course, the best (and generally most lucrative) way for a marque to showcase that remembrance is with a special edition model. Typically, Porsche produces these special editions for the 911, but there have been a few for the Boxster as well and we saw quite a few of them as the 987 model run neared its end. Of the various special editions of the Boxster released at this time the Boxster RS60 Spyder was the one that Porsche used as a commemoration. In this case it was to commemorate their victory at the 12 Hours of Sebring in 1960. The winning car that day was the Porsche 718 RS Spyder. The 718 was an important racer for Porsche capable of competing with the more powerful Ferraris in the Targa Florio and further establishing Porsche’s name among racing’s elite. For its commemorative model, production was capped at – you guessed it – 1960 units and like many of Porsche’s special editions the “specialness” primarily came in the guise of a unique GT Silver Metallic exterior over a Carrera Red interior that was intended to match the look of the 718 RS Spyder itself. These cars did receive a bump in power thanks to a new exhaust – bringing power up to 303 hp, 8 more than the standard 295 hp of the Boxster S – but overall there were no significant alterations to power or weight. For fans of Porsche’s racing history the RS60 Spyder provides another opportunity to experience that connection, even if only in its most basic sense.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Porsche Boxster RS60 Spyder on eBay

2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder

The Porsche Boxster has been with us for nearly twenty years now and while it initially was derided as being somewhat soft Porsche gradually applied corrections and enhancements, most notably releasing the Boxster S, and at this point the Boxster makes for an excellent open-top performer. Even still the Boxster has never really been Porsche’s go to performance car. Much of that has been reserved, quite naturally, for the 911, but also for the Cayman, which debuted around half way through the Boxster’s current life. The Boxster has first and foremost been a roadster. Following along in that tradition the release of the Boxster Spyder was long overdue. The traditional roadster was meant to be a relatively simple machine. Granted, with the passage of time that formula has shifted toward higher degrees of refinement, but there remains within the ethos of any open-top two-seater that basic sense of sacrificing practicality in the name of oneness between driver, machine, and environment. In that manner, in producing the Spyder Porsche scrapped more than 100 pounds from the Boxster S through a variety of weight saving measures, most visibly through the sacrifice of the standard convertible top for what really is little more than a sun shade. Additional savings were found through aluminum doors and lighter wheels along with a host of deletions from the interior, including the use of carbon-fiber sport seats. All together we are left with one of the lightest cars in the Porsche lineup, but still with plenty of power to compliment that lighter weight. The example we see here is a Carrera White 2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder, located in Texas, with Red leather interior and 10,244 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 Porsche Boxster Spyder on eBay

2008 Porsche Boxster S

 

I’m not sure if there is a more under appreciated and oft maligned sports car than the Porsche Boxster. I was quite fond of the original generation, even had a 1:18 scale Maisto model of the original concept version that would become the 986. I think what drew me to the car was the obvious design nod to the Porsche 550 Spyder, which is art on wheels as far as I’m concerned. The majority of people would say the Boxster is just the opposite. They still look at it as the poor man’s Porsche or the divorcee mobile or the car you get bait & switched into by a shady dealership when by some divine miracle, you make a hole in one at the tournament with a WIN A PORSCHE gimmick. Look it up, that kind of thing has totally happened.

I actually think that’s a good thing because it leaves plenty of these cars out there for those of us who know better than to be swayed by public opinion. The Boxster isn’t without its faults but that can be said of all Porsches right up to the very tip top models that like to catch on fire just for the hell of it. The Boxster is a great choice of vehicle for anyone who just loves to drive.  First one I got to pilot was a 2013 base model with the excellent 6spd manual transmission, top down on the freeway in the middle of December on a cloudy day in Los Angeles. I remember everything about that experience vividly and I think that’s a true testament to just how good of a machine these are.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Porsche Boxster S on Cars.com

Tuner Tuesday: 2005 Porsche Boxster Ruf 3800S

It seems like I’m often talking about what the best performance deal going in German cars is. That’s partially because I’m not partial to paying the “what’s new” tax on the biggest and baddest new car. Personally, I’d prefer to let someone else take the substantial depreciation hit and when it’s no longer new, swoop in for what’s still (to me) a pretty new car in good shape. The other part, though, is that I’m not flush with cash; perhaps if I had limitless resources I’d be at the Porsche or Audi dealership every other year signing on a new car. Regardless, there’s a huge contingent of our readership that I believe is in a similar situation to me – hence why we tend to look at older, more affordable (most of the time) models that represent good value, performance or collectability for a more modest investment. That brings us to the car at hand; in this post’s case, a 2005 Porsche Boxster. 2005 was early into the 987 production, having replaced the 986 in 2004. By most peoples’ measure, the 987 was a better looking car, mimicking many of the styling cues of the 997 as the 986 had mimicked the 996. Performance was also improved from some new motors, including an upgraded 3.4 liter engine in the S producing nearly 300 horsepower. That motor, however, did not appear until 2007 – meaning the top-tier S model in 2005 still had the 3.2 from the 986 sitting in the middle of the car. That motor was good for 276 horsepower, which by no means was a small amount. For some people it simply wasn’t enough though, and as expected German super-tuner Ruf offered the solution. The modified Boxsters went by the names of their engine displacement; in the 986, there was the 3400S, which was replaced by the 3600S.…

10K Friday Super Drop-Top Edition: Cabriolet v. TT v. S4 v. Cabriolet v. Beetle v. Eos v. S2 v. Boxster v. M Roadster v. M3 v. 500SL v. CLK55 AMG

Okay, hang on folks, this is a long one – what’s the most class, speed and style that you can get for $10,000 these days in German motoring? I’ve lined up some of the examples of just how much you can buy – which is your favorite?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Audi Cabriolet on eBay