1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

I’m going to move on from the 964 soon, but before I did I wanted to post one more. The Japanese Carrera 2 from earlier this week reminded me that the Carrera RS can now be legally imported so I couldn’t pass up the chance to feature one of those. Despite its rarity there are usually a few of these available at any given time. That does, of course, mean expanding your search quite far and even though they are available a few is just that, a few. So it still isn’t easy, but they are out there.

I wanted to find one that wasn’t too crazy expensive (though finding one below $200K seems very difficult so “expensive” is a bit relative here). There are some of those available if you want one as a collector, but I wanted to find one with some miles and that hopefully someone could drive. This also meant looking at something in a more standard color. And that’s what we see here with this Guards Red 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS, located in Italy, with 81K kilometers on it.

If you do happen to desire one that’s a little more rare and more interesting, this one or this one could suit your needs. Both of those have similar miles to this one, but come in more daring colors. All of these should be great!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on Classic Driver

Year: 1992
Model: 911 Carrera RS
Engine: 3.6 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 81,000 km (~ 50,332 mi)
Price: €190,000 (~ $217,000)

February 1992
Car in perfect condition.
The current owner (collector Porsche and Ferrari) possesses since 2000, and is the third owner.
The car has covered 81.000 kilometers.
Original engine and transmission.

1969 Porsche 911T – Carrera RS Tribute

1969 Porsche 911T – Carrera RS Tribute

There is something to be said for simplicity; for not being over the top. This is especially the case when the car you are attempting to pay homage to is itself intended to prioritize a certain level of simplicity (though with a heavy dose of mechanical sophistication). Over the top certainly has its place. Just take a look at one of Singer’s builds, they are over the top in about the best possible way. Everything works together though and the total is worth all of that effort. This car, originally a 1969 Porsche 911T that is now built as a tribute to the venerable 1973 911 Carrera RS, is not over the top. The interior especially is spartan, it is simple. It is befitting of the RS to which it pays tribute. That’s why I like it. It really looks great!

And because it’s orange…I also like it because it’s orange.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1969 Porsche 911T – Carrera RS Tribute on eBay

Year: 1969
Model: 911T
Engine: 2.7 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 800 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

Up for sale is my 1973 2.7 RS Lightweight tribute. This is a real long hood built on a 1969 tub. This is a fresh/new build that is in immaculate condition. Car has about 800 miles since full restoration that was done in an effort to balance practicality while holding true to the spirit and aesthetic of one of the most iconic 911s of all time. Below is a summary of the build:

Engine

7R Magnesium case

46 IDA Weber Carbs w/ K&N Filters and Hats
Twin Plug set up with Electromotive electronic ignition
Ported heads
JE 10.5:1 90mm pistons
Nikasil replated Mahle cylinders
DC40 Mod-S Cams
ARP head studs and rod bolts/nuts
Balanced crankshaft, clutch and flywheel
Headers with Leistritz muffler
Front mounted oil cooler
Transmission

Fresh 915

Resurfaced flywheel
Sachs Power Clutch
Brakes/Suspension

930 Brakes
930 Steering rack
930 Suspension
Wheels

15×7 & 15×8 genuine Fuchs w/ new tires
Interior

New RS Door panels
Prototipo Steering Wheel
Appbiz RS Lightweight carpeting
Black headliner
Radio Delete
Other

New Bosch battery
Just changed oil this week Brad Penn 20-50 High Zinc
Steel rear flares
H4 headlights
Beautiful dash and all gauges function

Overall, car is stunning, drives phenomenally and certainly sounds the part with the current exhaust set up.

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSH

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSH

I want to start the New Year off with a car that’s quite special and one of the rarest models Porsche has ever produced for the 911. We’re all quite familiar with the legendary 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS. What most are much less familiar with is the precursor to those great machines. Prior to production of the RS the car needed to be homologated – this was the whole purpose of building the model in the first place – after which a few creature comforts would be added to bring the RS to either the Lightweight or Touring spec that became the typical production models. However, 17 owners chose to leave the cars as is, adding none of the options and built based off of those homologated models. These 17 were dubbed the RSH. They were very spartan lacking clock, radio, soundproofing, even the glove box lid and as such tipped the scales at a mere 935 kg, making them even lighter than the RS Lightweight. The RSH takes one of Porsche’s truly special cars and raises the stakes even further.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RSH at Jan B. Lühn

Capitalizing on an Air-Cooling Market? 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport Tribute – REVISIT

Capitalizing on an Air-Cooling Market? 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport Tribute – REVISIT

Generally, I try to stay away from regurgitating material. However, once in a while a special car that makes me look back comes along, and today’s 911 Carrera RS Clubsport replica was certainly worthy of such devotion of time. The build was exhaustive and utilized factory parts throughout. The result? Stunning, to say the least! But, of course, since I originally wrote this car up nearly 3 years to the day ago, the air-cooled market has both soared, and for most models, gently cooled. The cars that remain at the top have been extraordinary examples such as the ultra-limited RS, turbo and truly special examples of the early and late air-cooled cars.

Where does a tribute car factor into this? Well, that’s tough to judge. That the car didn’t sell at its original $145,000 asking price is somewhat telling. However, three years on the car is now valued by the same seller at double the original asking price – now, $285,000. Before you punch your computer screen and throw insults vicariously through your keyboard, let’s put that into perspective. The last factory RS Clubsport we looked at stickered nearly $100,000 more than this car. Another, closer visually to the look of this car equipped with the spoilers and Speedline wheels, was asking nearly $300,000 more than this tribute. Still, it’s going to take just the right person who likes the looks but doesn’t care about the authenticity to stomach the mortgage payment for this ’95.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 RS Clubsport Replica on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site December 3, 2013:

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Touring – REVISIT

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Touring – REVISIT

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With the holidays approaching why don’t we dream a little bit of those really special gifts. The Grand Prix White 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Touring we featured back in the Spring remains up for sale. The asking price has dropped a notch or two (not that we’d likely notice given what’s still being asked), but like any RS it remains one of the most costly 911s on the market. This one is priced more in line with what we see for a Sport rather than a Touring so it’s going to be a tough sell. But for that money you get one of the best Porsche has produced and a car any 911 aficionado instantly will recognize and lust after.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Touring on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site April 7, 2016:

1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport

1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport

Last week I featured a 993 Carrera RS with the Clubsport package and this week we’ll look at its predecessor a 964 Carrera RS, similarly equipped as a Clubsport, a.k.a. the Carrera RS NGT M003 as designated by the option code for the model. Of the air-cooled RS models Porsche produced the version for the 964 remains, for me, the best looking. Not necessarily the best, but best looking. It finds a better balance between aggressive and understated looks relative to its peers all packaged within a design that quite clearly makes known its classic 911 roots. The 993 certainly takes a variety of areas of performance to better heights and for pure historical significance and rawness the original ’73 Carrera RS is hard to top. But the 964 works for me and should provide a road-going experience that meets most every demand I could concoct. The Guards Red example we see here is located in the Netherlands and sits with a shade under 42K miles on the clock.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport on Classic Driver

1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport

1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport

I’m going to break away rather abruptly from looking to find 911s we can all aspire to in order to look at a 911 we can aspire to in a different sort of way. More along the lines of peak aspiration I guess you’d say. For buyers for whom the standard 911 has proved too soft or too refined – basically too suited for the masses – Porsche has offered their RS model. It hasn’t always been available, especially during the company’s leaner years, but when available the Carrera RS (along with the later GT3 RS) has offered the sort of pared down high performance that few buyers desire and even fewer would actually purchase. For the 993, Porsche took this ethos a step further offering a Clubsport option for the RS. The package effectively deleted everything from the interior that was unnecessary, including the carpets, and then welded in a full roll cage to provide extra degrees of rigidity and safety to the chassis. In what I can only assume was a strange twist of comedy, the original purchaser of this 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport asked Porsche to put the air-conditioning back in the car. While we might surmise that request was because the owner wanted to actually drive the darn thing and thus needed at least that small bit of comfort, this RS sits with fewer than 20K miles on it. If we want to look on the bright side, I suppose it makes a very rare car even rarer still.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Clubsport on eBay

Motorsports Monday: 1971 Porsche 911 RSR Martini Racing Tribute – REVISIT

Motorsports Monday: 1971 Porsche 911 RSR Martini Racing Tribute – REVISIT

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On the verge of three years ago I took a look at a neat 911 Carrera RSR tribute. Rather than take the typical path of copying the IROC cars, the builder of this particular car chose the “Mary Stuart” Martini Racing example to clone. The car was named because the wrap around rear duck-tail spoiler reminded some of the high collars which were the vogue during Mary, Queen of Scots’ reign. With its unique tail offsetting those iconic colors, it is certainly an attention getter. However, the seller has now attempted to shift this car more or less continually since 2013 – first at an asking price of $165,000, then dropping in 2014 to $135,000, and now back up to $165,000 presumably to try to capitalize on the current 911 market. It is without a doubt a neat build and unique execution, so even though it’s unlikely to trade this time around again I thought it was worth another look:

The below post originally appeared on our site September 9, 2013:

I think I’ve made it pretty clear that I think Martini Racing colors are just awesome. Some people insist everything looks better in “Gulf Blue”, but for me, it’s those Martini stripes that made some of the best looking race cars (and in a very few cases, even improved road cars). Case in point is today’s example; perhaps one of the strangest downforce attempts of the 1970s on a Porsche – the Mary Stuart tailed Martini Racing RSR. While a neat design in some ways, it certainly looks odd from other angles. Today’s 1971 911 is a recreation of the original, but you can’t deny that it looks fantastic in the proper Martini Racing colors of the 1973 RSR:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1971 911 RSR Martini Racing replica on Ebay

1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS

Here is something we definitely don’t see everyday. From the outset I’ll say that there are a lot of questions to be asked about this 911, but once those questions are answered then this one probably won’t be around long. Here we have a 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS, located in Texas, with 17,893 miles on it. Since the 993 Carrera RS was never imported into the United States and because we have not yet reached the 25 year window in which such a car can more easily be imported, I’m always curious how the rare few of these that do exist here manage to find their way to our shores. There are always ways to get around such obstacles and this isn’t the first one I’ve come across, but in each case there lingers that same aura of mystery. Those concerns cover our first set of questions, and frankly those are probably the most important as they help establish the authenticity of this 911 and its road legality. I should state, this does appear to be a genuine RS so I don’t want to heap doubt upon it in that regard, but at this sort of price caution is always warranted.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera RS on eBay

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Touring

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Touring

Well here’s something we don’t see every day: a 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Touring up for auction on eBay. Given where the starting bid has been set, I suspect this auction is intended to serve more as an advertisement of this 911’s availability rather than as a true attempt at a sale (though I’m sure if someone wants to meet the likely very high reserve then the seller will have no qualms selling the car). The Carrera RS is probably the most iconic 911 Porsche has produced and given the stature of the 911 itself that makes the Carrera RS one of the all-time greats in the automotive world. They were the first in what has become a long line of RS models produced to meet racing homologation requirements, all of which have been to the benefit of Porsche, and 911, fans across the world. It would be nearly two decades before Porsche released the Carrera RS again, this time as a 964, which provided the original RS a broad spectrum within which it could operate and attract attention. Naturally, they are highly sought after and very expensive. They almost never come up for sale outside of prestigious auctions so this provides us a rare treat.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS Touring on eBay

Tuner Tuesday: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS RCT

Tuner Tuesday: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS RCT

Take two very desirable machines and stick them together and you get…? Well, for starters you get a car that I haven’t ever come across before. You also get a conundrum, but more on that later. Here we have a Guards Red 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS, a highly desirable and ridiculously wonderful machine in its own right. However, this isn’t a standard Carrera RS, but rather a Carrera RS whose 3.6 liter flat-six has been turbocharged by the wonder-workers at Ruf Automobile GmbH. That means 370 hp in one of the lighter 964 variants produced. It means a narrow-body 911 with a healthy does of power being delivered only to the rear wheels. And it means an object of much desire.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Porsche 911 Carrera RS RCT on 4 Star Classics

1976 Porsche 911S – Carrera RS Tribute

1976 Porsche 911S – Carrera RS Tribute

Modified Porsches, especially those which take aim at the look of an iconic model like the Carrera RS, are all about that first impression. While the details ultimately are what is important, we come across enough of these builds that it becomes easy to pass by many of them before those details even become apparent. Since you’re seeing it here, it should be clear that this one attracted enough attention to warrant a closer look. The details here are somewhat straightforward: this was originally a 1976 911S now fitted with the engine from a 3.2 Carrera mated to the 915 5-speed transmission. In typical fashion the exterior is completed with flares, a ducktail spoiler, and a set of Fuchs-style wheels all draped in Talbot Yellow with Black accents. The interior takes its cues from the Carrera RS with most amenities deleted and a set of Recaro seats that while not period-correct still look mighty good inside this 911. Mechanically it’d have been great if this were taken up a few notches, though that does tend to raise the asking price significantly. Perhaps this one may best serve as a canvas for additional performance upgrades should a new owner desire them. Strictly on appearance this one looks quite good.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1976 Porsche 911S – Carrera RS Tribute on eBay

1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe – RS Clone – REVISIT

1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe – RS Clone – REVISIT

The Speed Yellow 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe with a slew of RS pieces has come back up for sale. I asked the last time we featured this car whether it was worth the asking price and the consensus appears to be that it is not. Well, that price has come down some, though at $89K the sellers are still asking a lot. Still it’s a wonderfully beautiful machine, possibly one of the best of the 911 breed, there’s just the matter of figuring how much those looks are worth.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe – RS Clone on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site August 11, 2015:

1973 Porsche 911 RSR Backdate

1973 Porsche 911 RSR Backdate

One of the consistent criticisms of cars like the one we see here is that their level of execution and performance never seem to match their high price tag. I guess we can call this the Singer problem. Singer, as most are aware, produces bespoke backdated 911s that combine many of the best performance parts with the best aesthetic features, both inside and out. Each build is individual and in many ways a work of art. They are also incredibly expensive. Some builders seem keen to follow Singer’s lead without nearly the same quality and performance, and then hope to still extract high prices (even if they aren’t as high as those charged by Singer itself). The car here comes with the typical very high price tag, but in this case there is a lot more going on performance-wise than in other builds we’ve come across. This 911 started life as a 1984 Porsche 911 Carrera Turbo-look. The appearance was backdated to that of a ’73 911 RSR while the engine was replaced with a 3.8 liter flat-six built to 993 Carrera RS specs. The interior received alterations to suit its increased sporting pretensions. The seller describes it as minimalist and that description seems apt. It was then painted in Ferrari Rosso Corso, presumably because the owner was a Ferrari enthusiast. The result is a very striking 911 whose RSR roots are clear on the outside, but which packs a very potent and more modern punch. I would imagine the performance of this 911 would be quite exhilarating and it is in that regard that this build significantly distances itself from many others we have seen. Does it justify the high price?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Porsche 911 RSR Backdate on eBay

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS Touring

1973 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS Touring

For many enthusiasts of the 911 the Carrera RS sits atop a long list of highly-regarded cars. Today it is difficult to even keep track of the number of special variants of the 911 Porsche has offered, but in many ways they all reach back to the original RS, a car developed to fit Porsche’s racing needs for homologation. These also marked the rebirth of the Carrera name, first attached to the four-cam 356, which saw quite a bit of racing success of its own. As with most any racing development the build’s emphasis was on the combination of power and less weight. With 210 hp and weighing 2370 pounds in Touring configuration the Carrera RS would be a capable performer even by modern standards. During its time it must have seemed like a revelation. The example here is an early production, left-hand drive, Black 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera RS. Strangely, this is the first Carrera RS I can recall coming across in Black. That may be entirely anecdotal given how often we otherwise come across Black 911s, but perhaps there exists some additional rarity in that well known color. Regardless, it is fantastic!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Porsche 911 Carrera 2.7 RS Touring on Hexagon Classics