Double Take: Open-top G50 Carreras

I’m forcing the issue a little bit here as I will freely admit there aren’t great reasons for lumping these two 911s together. So why? Basically because I think each is worth consideration for those in the market for a 3.2 Carrera, but neither is really distinguished enough that I think one is obviously superior to the other, nor are they distinguished enough to write up separately. So why not look at them both?

These two 911s each present as similar examples of a late classic 911 and since neither is a Coupe they also present the choices for those who prefer a bit of open-top enjoyment. Each comes from the final three model years after Porsche fitted the G50 5-speed manual transmission and I think their condition is pretty comparable. While the mileage of each is a bit different neither is crazy high nor crazy low. Lastly, I think their selling prices should be pretty close. So if you’re in the market for a G50 Carrera and want a little wind in your hair these both should be worth further investigation.

I’ll go chronologically and begin with this Grand Prix White 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet, located in New Jersey, with Dark Blue leather interior and 68,050 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet on eBay

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Motorsports Monday: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe

Over the past few decades, the classic car market has been so crazy in some cases that former race cars have been reverted expensively back to street models in order to capitalize on their greater value. Factory race cars obviously retain their appeal – sometimes even if they were never raced – yet cars that were converted by your average enthusiast retain the prospect of a return to their former street-worthy status. One of the most popular cars to convert to track use has traditionally been the Porsche 911, a car that since it’s inception was a gentleman racer in the making. But with values in a shocking climb, will we see these 911s leave their ancestral home at the track and head for climate-controlled garages with heavy specialty insurance premiums?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe on eBay

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Motorsports Monday RS Style: 1979 and 1987 Porsche 911s

It goes without saying that the Porsche 911 is one of the most popular modified chassis ever conceived, and a fair amount of those modifications are track-based. The results are sometimes mixed; however, one of the more popular trends which I think is pretty slick is backdating 911s. It’s ironic, since for some time it was more popular to update the looks of many of the older race cars to new 964 or 993 bodies. However, the surge in pricing in the 1960s and 1970s 911 market has resulted in many backdated cars coming to market. Obviously, the advantage is that you get a better driving and more powerful car with more options than original, but it’s got the look of the sought after early models. However, probably the biggest advantage is that of price; with a lower entry cost, prospective buyers aren’t afraid to use the 911 where it is well suited; driving fast on a race track. Today I have two different takes on backdated 911s, both with a nod towards the mega-buck RS model. Which is the one you’d choose?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera on eBay

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1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe – REVISIT

The 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe we featured in early October is back up for sale with a $10K reduction in its price, now listed at $189,999.99. The Slantnose 911s do not appeal to everyone, but as a symbol of ’80s flair and excess they are rarely topped. Even with significant collector appeal it will be interesting to see if the market for one of these has reached these heights.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site October 4, 2014:

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1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe

The poster car: we all had them on our wall when growing up. Rarely subtle, these were cars that stunned you visually and were almost always very fast. At least, that was my wall. The most common poster in the ’80s was probably the Countach, which still today looks insane. The Countach, however, was insane. Porsche’s road-going version of Countach excessiveness was the 930 Slantnose, but because it was based off of the very streetable 911 it lacked much of the insanity of the Countach. The appearance of the 930 itself was hardly subtle and in the guise of the Slantnose all hints of subtlety went out the window. Unsurprisingly, given the iconic nature of the 911’s front end, not everyone is a fan of the Slantnose, but their rarity makes them quite highly prized by collectors. The example here is a Guards Red 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe, located in California, with Tan interior and only 28,115 miles.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Slantnose Coupe on eBay

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Tuner Tuesday: 1989 Porsche 911 Speedster Twin-Turbo

If the insanity of the crazy modified 80s wasn’t enough for you in earlier’s DP 935 Targa, how about a 962-powered 911 Speedster? Sound absolutely bonkers? Yup, it sure is. But in the no holds barred world of the well-heeled, you can create just about anything that you want. Borrowing elements from the 962, 934, 959 and DP935 and adding them to the already quite rare and valuable Speedster, Bruce Canepa created the ultimate enthusiast’s dream of a convertible 911:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Speedster on Hemmings.com

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Tuner Tuesday: 1988 Porsche 911 Targa DP935 – REVISIT

Now primed for summer, the 1988 Porsche 911 Targa DP 935 Slantnose we wrote up earlier this year is still for sale. In the world of original DP cars, this is a bit of an oddity, but also more affordable than most of its turbocharged brothers. Will it leave you seeing red?

The below post originally appeared on our site February 11, 2014:

Click for more details: 1988 Porsche 911 Targa DP 935 Slantnose on eBay

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1989 Porsche 911 Carrera

There has been a decent bit of discussion lately concerning the current prices for air-cooled 911s and whether they’re being over valued. Much of that discussion has been concerned with a variety of rare variants that have seen very high prices. We might then wonder about the standard 3.2 Carrera and whether those prices too have shot up. The short answer is yes. The car featured here should provide us with a reasonable barometer of the current market for a classic 911 from the ’80s. Here we have a Black on Black 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera, located in New York, which has seen 57,000 miles. The value of this particular 911 should be buoyed by a couple of factors: 1) it comes from the final year of classic 911 production so it will be as refined as these cars get, including possessing the very desirable G50 5-speed manual transmission and 2) it has the factory sport seats.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 Carrera on eBay

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Tuner Tuesday: 1988 Porsche 911 Targa DP935

It’s been only a few weeks since I looked back at a super black DP935 that popped up for sale again with no changes but a hefty price increase. Well, today there is another DP modified car; this time, a claimed 1 of 1 Targa model built from a 1988 911. One of the criticisms of the black DP was that because of many changes over it’s life, it was effectively a highly modified turbo with a DP body kit. Today’s car suffers from the same fate, in a way – though it’s much more original. Bought in Germany and delivered to DP Motorsports, this Targa got the full external DP kit and some gorgeous BBS magnesium race wheels as well as a lowered suspension – but critically, no engine modifications seem to have made their way into this car. Afterwards, the interior was modified into the red/black combination that it currently sits in. With very few miles, this may be one of the more unique period-correct pieces in Porsche tuning history available right now:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 911 Targa DP935 on eBay

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Motorsport Monday – 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR replica

In the 1970s, Porsche was on a racing high. It seemed wherever they went and whatever they produced, they won. The focus on motorsport and development through racing lead to some notable production based racers and crossover technology. In 1973 Porsche released the legendary 911 Carrera RS, a homologated race car that could be road registered. Through 1974 it received many upgrades that made it more competitive as a race car, but ultimately the factory saw an opportunity to take even the hard-edged RS to the next level. Thus was born the 911 Carrera RSR, the Rennest of the RennSport models. Running 917 wheels and brakes with lightened panels resulting in a sub-2,000lb curb weight and a 3.0 flat six pushing 330 horsepower, these cars were formidable racers that competed against tube frame F1 engined cars – and won. Highly sought after but with less than 60 produced, finding one to buy is both a pricey and difficult proposition. However, many of the pieces are available to make a recreation, just as today’s example is:

Year: 1974
Model: 911 Carrera RSR
Engine: 3.8 liter flat-6
Transmission: 6-speed manual
Mileage: N/A mi
Price: $150,000

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Porsche 911 Carrera RSR replica on Race-Cars.com

Description
Ground Up-Scratch built from a 1974 coupe,no expense spared to build this new,classic and fast RSR.Over $190k invested.Only 25 race hours on the car.Build sheet and extensive photos available.
Performance Data
• Weight: 2035 lbs
Engine
• Engine Builder: Porsche
• Manufacturer: Porsche
• Type: 911 RSR
• Displacement: 3.8L
• Horsepower: 402
• Torque: 279
• Heads: Camfer
• Connecting Rods: Carrillo RSR
• Pistons: 3.8 Supercup
• Camshaft: Ultra Race Cams
• Clutch: RSR
• Pressure Plate: RSR
• Flywheel: RSR
• Total Time: 10 race hours
Fuel System
• Fuel Cell
• Manufacturer: ATL
• Age: new
• Capacity: 17g
Oil/Water System
• Oil Cooler: 935
Transmission
• Manfacturer: Porsche
• Type: G50
• Gears: 6
• Shifter: Hargett
• Trans Cooler: 935
Rear End
• Differential: Torque Diff
Body
• Construction: steel/fiberglass
• Condition: excellent
Chassis
• Front Suspension: 935 RSR strut monoball billet
• Rear Suspension: 930 set up
• Shocks: JRZ 1231 3 way
• Wheels: Penta/BBS 917 11.3×16 14×16
• Tires: Hoosier
Spares
• $10k of spares

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Looking at those rear wheels should qualify as a religious experience. It’s a stark reminder that this was a time when there were no computers to control wheelspin, slip angles, and brake lockup. Determined to prove to the world that a 30/70 weight bias would work, Porsche put massive flares which just barely contained those nearly square wheels and a giant rear spoiler – the origin of the loved 80s “Whale Tail” spoiler that would adorn so many Turbos. This car has been faithfully re-created where necessary and important, but upgraded in all of the right areas – the G50 transmission is a great addition, and who wouldn’t need 20 percent more power and modern rubber to keep it planted? Read through most advertisements and run across the phrase “no expense spared” and they’re usually suspect, but in this case it’s hard not to believe. The car looks amazingly good and shockingly clean for a race car – check out that engine bay! I even love that they used a correct 1974 chassis as a basis, since many replicas use an easier to obtain newer car retrofitted with earlier panels.

At $150,000, this isn’t a car for everyone. It won’t be as fast as newer Cup Cars around a track. It won’t be easy to drive. It won’t even be cheap to run. However, this is very much the case of you couldn’t build it for the sale price. You could run $50,000 building the proper engine alone! What appeals to me about a car like this, though, is that it has a presence about it that the newer cars just can’t replicate. Pull up anywhere with this and you’re guaranteed to have a crowd. Then, take a moment to consider what it would cost to own a real one; the last that came up for sale was Emerson Fittipaldi’s IROC racer in the $800,000 range. In 2012, the 2.1 turbo RSR “Baby” sold for $3.25 Million. And the reality is, at that price would you really even want to drive (never mind race) one of those irreplaceable cars? Not likely. This then, is the way to have your cake and eat it too – look like a million bucks, have a million thrills, and don’t be (too) afraid to write it all off. To me, that’s a deal – now, anyone know what organs I can live without that would generate $150,000?

-Carter