2004 Volkswagen Passat GLS 1.8T Variant

The Volkswagen Passat isn’t a particularly exciting car to drive. It’s also not particularly exciting to look at. While most people would categorize those as negative attributes for vehicle ownership, there’s a third thing that the Passat isn’t particularly exciting at which I’d wager most would consider a very good thing.

It’s not an exciting car to own.

“But isn’t that a bad thing?!?! you’re thinking to yourself? Sure, when I go out into the garage and see the M3 sitting there, my pulse rate quickens. Scratch that, I don’t even have to go into the garage – endorphins flow at the mere thought of it. And turning the key? All sorts of goodness happens. I’ll spare you the details, but sufficed to say it’s an exciting car to own, look at and drive. The Passat is not a M3.

But it is a vehicle thoroughly devoid of drama, and to me, that’s what makes the Passat a not exciting car to own. Take the contemporary Audi Allroad from the same period for example. The Passat mimics the look and the function of the A6 in nearly every way. It’s not even much slower on a continuum. But Less exciting to own? For sure, and when you’re talking breaking and repairs, that’s a very good thing.

Because let’s be honest for a second; these cars that we love, that we fawn over, that we pontificate about – they’re pieces of metal with a lot of plastic and complicated electrical and pneumatic systems. And they’re not getting any younger. Take my 2002 Passat as a case study; it’s on the verge of being 17 years old and has now covered over 140,000 miles. Yet it’s caused no sleepless nights, no emptying of wallets, not even left me stranded once. It’s just been completely reliable transportation in all weather, with my family, all our goods and a ridiculous amount of various cargo.…

2000 Volkswagen Cabrio

In an attempt to challenge Mercedes-Benz’s R107 for chassis longevity, Volkswagen’s introduction of a more affordable German drop-top in the 1980 Rabbit Convertible stretched production until 1993. That meant that the A1 outlasted all of the A2 production cycle and was no squarely into the newly launched A3. Volkswagen introduced their replacement for the aging and renamed Cabriolet with the Mk.3 Cabrio in 1994. As with the A1, production again would extend beyond the A3 chassis life, because in 1999 VW introduced us to the fourth generation Golf. As with the 2nd generation, VW didn’t plan a convertible version for the Mk.4 – well, at least, not for the Golf, as convertible duties would be handed off to the New Beetle. But since the launch of the nostalgic Beetle Convertible waited until 2003, VW covered the gap with the “Mk3.5” refresh on the Cabrio. It received softened and rounded bumper covers, Mk.4 inspired lights, and a lightly revised interior. As with other VW models, there was a base GL model or the better equipped GLS, like today’s example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2000 Volkswagen Cabrio on eBay

GCFSB Project: 2002 Volkswagen Passat GLS 1.8T Variant Part 2

It’s been nearly a year since I did the introductory piece to my 2002 Volkswagen Passat GLS 1.8T Variant. Too much of that year was filled with snow in New England, which allowed me to get one more season out of my pretty tired Blizzaks and dream of warmer climates while pondering what to do. One thing that kept coming to mind was that even though the Passat still feels relatively new to me, the reality is that it’s a 13 year old car already. That’s older than both of my B2 Audis were when I originally bought them – something that I still find pretty staggering. As such, there’s a length list of minor things that could be refreshed on the cars, and unlike the lack of aftermarket support for the Type 85 Audis the Passat still has lots of parts available to buy on the open market. Thus, sitting through one of the many snowfalls this year, I crafted some minor upgrade plans to address a few trim items that annoyed me.…

B4 Variant-off: 1997 Passat GLX VR6 v. 1996 Passat GLS TDi

Without a doubt, Wagon Week is one of our favorite features here at German Cars For Sale Blog, and while there are plenty of desirable, big name Avants, Tourings and Estates that grab the headlines and generate the “likes” on Myface or Spacebook or Instaselfie or whatever, if I’m honest I’m always a fan of the underdog Passat Variant. Perhaps it’s because I’ve owned two, perhaps it’s because it’s the less common choice; I’m not entirely certain. True, the Passat isn’t the best performing wagon out there, and I’d concede that it’s not the best looking or best made one either. But in terms of the performance you can get in a stealthy, good looking package on a budget, I think that the Passat may be the real sleeper in the German wagon realm. But the positive aspects of the Passats aren’t unknown to all; the Quantum Syncro is always a popular if rarely seen ’80s icon for the company, and when we got to the Golf-based B3 and B4, there were some cool options too – such as the not-for-the-U.S. G60 Syncro. But even in the U.S., the B4 offered some neat performance options for the wagon aficionado – interestingly, in very different directions. Check the “GLX” option on your order form and you’d get the torquey, great sounding VR6 engine and BBS wheels in a sporty package. Check the “TDi” option, and you had a hyper-miler capable of over a thousand miles on a tank of gas. Yet while both have their niche markets, finding good examples of each can be quite difficult. Today we have one of each to compare, and I think it makes for an interesting showdown. Will either hit the $11,000 mark of the last B4 Variant we looked at?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1997 Volkswagen Passat GLX VR6 Variant on eBay

Volkswagen Eurovans

blue 2

As I continue on my van kick, today we’ll look at a couple of clean Eurovans that have a lot of life left in them but won’t break the bank. Maligned as the lamer, less-fun, front-engined descendent of the Bus and Vanagon. They’re a heck of a lot more authentic and European than the Routan, that’s for sure.

The first option is from the final year of the Eurovan, and it comes in the great, Estoril-esque Techno Blue.

Click for details: 2003 Volkswagen Eurovan on eBay

Wednesday Wheels GCFSB Project: 2002 Volkswagen Passat GLS 1.8T Variant Part 1

While we all want to have a classic, sporty German car in our lives, the reality of daily driver duty often falls onto less exotic cars. Several years ago I purchased a 1999 Volkswagen Passat 1.8T GLS to do just that; it replaced a 97 Golf as my daily driver, and I enjoyed over 100,000 miles behind the wheel. Unlike the reputation these cars have gained, I found my Passat to be very reliable – it never once left me stranded or failed to start, it could get 36 mpg if I didn’t get too deep into the throttle, and it was comfortable, quick and fun to drive. After a year of company car duty, the time had come for me to purchase another daily driver, and my immediate thought was that I wanted another Passat.

The search began, and it wasn’t very easy. There are two classes of Passats; devoted owners that keep their cars in great condition, and wrecks that will bankrupt you trying just to pass emissions. But in general the wagon versions were better kept than the sedans; likely a testament to their high sticker prices. It’s hard to fathom, but in 2002 my current car’s sticker price was over $26,000 – more than a brand new Passat will set you back today. As such, the Variants seem to be better kept than the sedans in general, and that was certainly the case when I finally found the car to buy. Priced higher in the market, it was a one-owner 100,000 mile Ink Blue model with grey leather. A GLS spec, it came with many nicer features and alloys, but wasn’t the wood-lined V6 luxury model. The single owner had been meticulous and had every record from new. It was the first time I had ever bought a car like this, and it was clearly worth the premium.…

2002 Volkswagen Eurovan GLS

I find it ironic that the company which popularized the small van over 60 years ago turned to another manufacturer when it came time to reintroduce a van to the US market. But that’s exactly what Volkswagen has done. The Routan is nothing more than a rebadged Dodge Caravan. Volkswagen projected they would sell around 45,000 of these vans in the first year, but they were only able to move a little more than 14,000 units. Perhaps this is automotive karma for this cop out of a product offering? Whatever the case may be, this has me questioning whether Volkswagen would have been better off offering the latest generation of what we see here for sale in Missouri, the Eurovan, or Transporter, as it is known elsewhere in the world.

This 2002 model represents the second to last year that the Eurovan was offered stateside. The last of the Eurovans featured the 2.8 liter VR6 engine with a four-speed automatic as the only transmission choice. Versus the earlier Eurovans with the anemic 2.5 liter five cylinder engine, these vans could at least get out of their way.

2002 Volkswagen Eurovan GLS on VW Vortex

The van was purchased new by my father in Feb. ’02 and then I purchased it from him in about 2 ½ years ago. It had Ziebart rust protection installed before delivery. I have complete history from the window sticker to the most recent repair. Everything works perfectly and it needs nothing. It passed full safety and emission inspections at the end of July.

Although all repairs are documented, these are a few of the most recent and major:

Nokian entyre tires (proper load rating) were installed in March of ’11.

June of this year (3k miles ago) I replaced all motor mounts, serviced transmission (fluid and filter), and replaced all brake pads (all parts purchased from Europarts SD)

Last week I replaced the alternator.

Mexican 1980 VW Jetta GLS for sale

Foreign-market cars are always interesting, whether it’s custom trim or a model completely absent from the US market. The Mk1 Jetta was certainly sold in the US, but I’m guessing you’ve never quite seen one like this Mexican example. I love the GLS striping, and overall this is an extremely clean example of the great original Jetta. You may be wondering about that elephant in the room though… Just how big are normal wheels on all cars these days? Check out these stock “Detroit” style wheels from a 2010 GTI making the Jetta look like a donk (definitely a “box,” not a “bubble”) I’d see in Oakland. Just another reason I think brand-new cars are merely caricatures of when they were simpler, better. Well, enough ranting, it’s certainly a new take on “OEM Plus,” and I kind of like it. Other than being grossly oversized, they fit the overall scheme of the car. The 1.8l with a 3-speed auto must have a hell of a time getting those ferris wheels turning, but the great part of old VWs is that a remedy for that is almost as accessible as switching the wheels.

1980 VW Jetta GLS for sale in Mexico


Description, in English and Spanish!

Up for Sale is a VW Jetta GLS MK1

Engine size is 1.8liter
Automatic 3 speed Transmission
Disk Brakes on all wheels
18″ Rims coming from a 2010 GTI
Brembo Disk Braking system
Good overall body and Paint
133,000 Kilometers
HID LIghts
No frame damage or accidents
Sold As Is with no warranty.

Vehicle currently has a Mexican Title under the state of Jalisco in Mexico.
Don’t know what it would if possible, take to make this car legal here in the US.
Buy at your own discretion.

This car is currently being used as a commuter car, engine runs strong with no oil leaks.