1982 Volkswagen Scirocco

1982 Volkswagen Scirocco

Yesterday’s 1985 Scirocco was a well modded driver. But if you wanted to win a preservation class – or, just liked the original configuration the car came in – it wasn’t for you. Today’s car answers those critics with a very clean first-year model of the second generation design. Though the shape of the new Scirocco was modern for the time, underneath the specification changed little from the outgoing model. It was still a Mk.1 underneath, with a 1.7 liter, 74 horsepower inline-4 providing adequate motivation to the 2,000 lb. coupe. Where the original Giugiaro design had held lovely nuance, the Karmann-penned follow-up borrowed heavily from the Asso di Picche design (ironically, also from Giugiaro) meaning it was all angles, everywhere. But it pulled it off reasonably well, and the second generation was quite popular, selling about a quarter million units in total. There were rolling changes throughout the years as more power, bigger spoilers and wheels, and even a more traditional second wiper appeared. But in terms of purity, the simple design shows through well despite the clunky U.S. spec bumpers on the early models like this 1982:

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1985 Volkswagen Scirocco

1985 Volkswagen Scirocco

Like the Rabbit Pickup from a few days ago, today’s Scirocco won’t win you a trophy in preservation-class at your local Euro show. But will it draw attention? Absolutely. The Scirocco 2 may not have been the landmark design the original Giugiaro-designed first generation was, nor was it as pretty, arguably. It was interesting that Volkswagen chose to farm the design to Karmann rather than pay for Italdesign’s follow up, because that resulted in the Scirocco’s competition. The Isuzu Piazza (Impulse) took the Italian’s lines to a new level with cleaner execution, cool wheels that looked ready for a auto show, plus you got the automotive equivalent of Thor’s hammer to impress your friends with trim levels like the “Turbo RS” and “Handling by Lotus”. Show up at a party in a Impulse Turbo while one of your friends drove a Scirocco, and you’d go home with the girl and Simple Minds playing in the background.

Okay, maybe it wasn’t that easy. And honestly even if the Scirocco was a little underpowered and had clunky bumpers and poor headlight execution here, it still was a compelling choice. This car fixes some of the second generation’s problems, too – Euro bumpers and headlights slim it down, the removal of the rear spoiler tidies up the design a surprising amount, and under the hood lies more motivation in a trusty ABA 2.0:

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1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Karmann Coupe

1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Karmann Coupe

I am always curious about Porsche colors I haven’t seen before and very much enjoy featuring them. This one comes with a caveat: per the CoA we know this 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Karmann Coupe did not come from the factory in this color. Nor was its interior this color. Originally it was Light Ivory over Red, which I suspect was a pretty striking combination in itself. But I digress, we aren’t told what the colors it wears now are, only that the exterior is green and the interior is tan. Though the interior almost looks yellow I’m going to assume that’s a result of its contrast with the green trim and that it is indeed a tan interior. It’s a light tan, but tan nonetheless. For the exterior, I have no idea what color it is. Any guesses?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1965 Porsche 356C 1600 SC Karmann Coupe on eBay

Year: 1965
Model: 356C 1600 SC
Engine: 1.6 liter flat-6
Transmission: 4-speed manual
Mileage: 0 mi since restoration
Price: $129,885 Buy It Now

We at Private Collection Motors are pleased to offer our beautiful 1965 Porsche 356 SC to the market. Starts at the touch of the key every time, a specimen that has clearly been lovingly owned and cared for, in far better condition than average, a joy to display and own.

Difficult to find many in better condition. naturally sold with Porsche Certificate of Authenticity. Still not perfect, as no non new item would be, but leaves onlookers with a smile and admiration.

Any shipping fees will buyers responsibility and you can select your own carrier and pay them directly.

In line with normal ebay practices please note that all inspections are to be made prior to auction close, …………….. Prior to auction close multiple inspections by the same person are no problem, you can come back as many times as you like, bring friends, cousins, mechanics, brothers, sisters, neighbor or spouses all welcome !

1987 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V

1987 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V

While we look at collector-grade automobiles more often than not, it’s always nice to ponder driver-quality cars too. I’ve made the conscious decision several times to not buy the nicest example of a car that I could find, instead trying to rehab a car that had been languishing and might otherwise have been forgotten. I’m now on my fifth example of this, and while economically it might not be the best plan there is something rewarding about salvaging a car and bringing it back from the brink. However, usually such examples are priced accordingly; I bought my 1984 GTi for $300, for example, and the same amount bought me a 200 quattro Avant about a decade later. Once I paid a staggering $800 for a Golf with nearly 200,000 miles on it, and the seemingly decadent V8 quattro set me back $2,000. All gave me lots of automotive joy – not the get in, nothing is wrong type, but if you cue the Sarah McLaughlin and sad puppy dog eyes roll across the screen, I can see the hope in salvation of nearly every car. There’s always something that’s good, right? In the case of today’s quarter-million mile Scirocco, there’s a lot that’s good:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V on eBay

1987 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V

1987 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V

Last night, I watched a “Throwback” Motorweek which reviewed the then-new top-tier twin-turbocharged Japanese sport coupes. It pitted the height of the market cars against each other – the Mitsubishi 3000GT VR-4, the Toyota Supra Turbo, the Mazda RX-7 and the Nissan 300ZX Twin Turbo in a head to head. It’s hard to believe only a year or two after that segment aired, all of those cars would have disappeared from the U.S. market. While vestiges of them have returned, we’re still generally left without that glut of fast Japanese GT cruisers that were available in the early 1990s. It reminded me of another segment that all but disappeared around the same time; the sports economy coupe. True, cars like the Scion TC live on, but remember when there were 11 or 12 different small coupes you could buy? Like the “HYBRID!”s of their day, each offered shouty colored badges about what made them special; a DOCH here, a 16 valve there, or if you were really, really cool, you had a TURBO badge somewhere on your car. Preferably, multiple places. I remember fondly my friend in high school’s Plymouth Sundance Turbo; it might as well have been a Ferrari to us. While Volkswagen never went that far, they did continue to offer their version of a sport coupe, the Scirocco, through the late 80s. Still sporting its Giugiaro-inspired but Karmann-stolen all-angles design proudly, the Scirocco had a bit of a mystique as all Volkswagen coupes had that it was the best of the class, even if by the numbers it wasn’t:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V on eBay

1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC – REVISIT

1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC – REVISIT

The low mileage 1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC we featured back in March has reappeared. As I prepare for another trip back to Europe in a few days, one thing I enjoy is getting to see all the vehicles we are denied here in the US. A car that sticks out in my mind lately is the Volkswagen Scirocco. Perhaps Volkswagen might reconsider sending this sports coupe back to the US with the falling value of the Euro, but it seems unlikely. The last sports coupe we would see from Volkswagen would be the car we see here. Whether its the earlier G60 or later SLC, good examples are in short supply these days. This particular car has triggered a bidding frenzy, so it should be a good car to watch to see where the market currently stands for the VR6 engined Corrado.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1992 Volkswagen Corrado SLC on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site March 16, 2015:

1987 Volkswagen Scirocco

1987 Volkswagen Scirocco

There always seem to be cases of survivors that pop up when you least expect it; cars that you just never see and think you’ll likely never see again. Yet, on a fairly regular basis we find excellent condition Sciroccos and Porsche 924s. What is it about these two models that set them apart? Compare the number of mint condition Sciroccos that you find to mint condition Mk.2 GTis, for example. I can’t really even think of the last time we saw a great condition 85-89 GTi, but Sciroccos? I bet we’ve seen 10 excellent examples in the past year. It’s the same thing with 924s; there always seems to be one “survivor” car floating around. The other thing that seems to link these packages are that the asking prices always seem to be a bit…well, ambitious. But if survivor Porsche 924s always seem to be a bit overpriced with no market to support them, we’ve seen a few Sciroccos change hands above the $10,000 mark recently. That’s some serious change for the Karmann coupe, and usually reserved for the later 16V models – although there was one virtually new 1983 Wolfsburg edition that broke into 5 figures. Today we have another excellent condition Scirocco – will this one be a market stunner too?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Volkswagen Scirocco on eBay

Original Owner 1973 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia

Original Owner 1973 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia

When my mother went to buy her first car, she had her sights set on a Volkswagen Karmann Ghia. Ever the practical man, my grandfather told her she shouldn’t be buying something without a backseat. He steered her towards buying a 1972 Super Beetle instead, even if he was a very “buy American” consumer at that point. So a Super Beetle with an Automatic Stick Shift gearbox it was. To this day, every time a Karmann Ghia will pass, my mother always mentions how much she wanted one, but at this point, it’s unrealistic she’ll probably try her hand at ownership. This 1973 Karmann Ghia for sale by The Gallery Brummen in The Netherlands is an amazing survivor with original paint sourced from an owner in Switzerland.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1973 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia at the Gallery Brummen

1956 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia

1956 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia

It seems these days the blueprint to own a classic car in good condition is to go to a big-headline auction and pay ever-increasing amounts to get the best and most unique example of a particularly popular run of car possible. Look at the 911 and E30 M3, though they’re not alone; the frenzy over prices has created its own “Hemi” moment as prices double on a year over year basis. Where does that leave enthusiasts? With plenty of options, thank you very much. If you want a classic Porsche like the 356 or early 911s but just can’t stomach the incredible bills associated with those cars, why not consider the early Karmann Ghia? Seriously, to someone who was uninitiated, if you took the badges off of each and swapped them around, it would be easy to believe that the 356 was a Volkswagen product and the Karmann Ghia was the Porsche – its sleek lines look, if anything, more sporty than the 356. Classicly styled, long and low and with that trademark flat-four soundtrack that drove several generations, the Karmann Ghia is one of the few classic German cars that is still quite affordable but will make you feel like a million dollars wherever you pull up – especially when presented in the condition of today’s 1956 example:

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Heap of the Week: 1980 Volkswagen Scirocco S

Heap of the Week: 1980 Volkswagen Scirocco S

After touring around Portugal for the past week and seeing a few of the newer Volkswagen Sciroccos on the street, it had me thinking a lot about the first and second generation of Sciroccos and what made them popular stateside. Introduced as a replacement for the Karmann Ghia in the early 1970s, this fastback wore smart, chiseled bodywork penned by Giorgetto Giugiaro. Based on the recently introduced Mk1 Golf architecture, this car adhered to the old formula of taking a rather ordinary car and making it look extraordinary. Early Mk1 Sciroccos are getting hard to come across in good nick, but this 1980 Scirocco S for sale in Florida is a good baseline for someone looking for a mild restoration project.

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1968 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia Type 34

1968 Volkswagen Karmann Ghia Type 34

It is interesting how classic automotive values evolve and change; take, for example, today’s 1968 Karmann Ghia Type 34. Originally launched as a celebration of the new Type 3 and sporting arguably some of the best looking bodywork ever fit to a Volkswagen, the Type 34 was expensive even by Volkswagen standards in its day; for the asking price, for example, you could buy two Beetles. In some regards, that makes it the Phaeton of its day, and similar to the Phaeton, it has a small and devoted crowd that love these cars. Despite that, values on the Type 34 are below some of the top values for the “lesser” contemporary Volkswagens – notably the Sambas, though good examples do really shine through. Today’s is one of the best; finished in original Lotus White with black roof, this all-original Type 34 is simply stunning:

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1988 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V

1988 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V

A few weeks back, I wrote up a restored Scirocco 16V. With a lot of work completed, I guessed that the reserve was set high at around $10,000 considering some of the better Sciroccos we had seen and what they brought. Well, I was wrong; that car is back up for sale with a “Buy It Now” set below the high bid when I wrote the article at $5,000. Does that mean the world isn’t ready for $10,000 Sciroccos? Well, this seller apparently thinks we’re very close:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Volkswagen Scirocco 16V on Kijiji

1983 Volkswagen Cabriolet 16V

1983 Volkswagen Cabriolet 16V

The Volkswagen market is fairly fickle these days. Some low mile, original cars go for big bucks; other times, its unlikely modified cars that draw the money. But it seems in general that the 16V Scirocco and original GTi are the two shining stars right now for 1980s Volkswagens. What do you get when you put them together and chop the top off? A 16V Cabriolet, of course! Granted, this isn’t how this car was delivered from the factory, but if you’re looking for the best of three world, perhaps you can enjoy this Cabby modified in the style of OEM:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1983 Volkswagen Cabriolet on eBay

1965 Porsche 356C Coupe

1965 Porsche 356C Coupe

The Porsche 356 entered its final year of production just as the Porsche 911 was becoming known to the world and in their respective designs we can see the ways in which Porsche evolved one car so as to transition to the other. Today, many of the rarer 356 variants fetch prices at auction well into six-figure territory, but even a standard Coupe is prized amongst Porsche and vintage-automobile enthusiasts alike. The car we have featured here comes from the final year of 356 production: a Black on Black 1965 Porsche 356C Coupe that has spent its entire life in the easy climate of California.

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1967 Porsche 912 Karmann Coupe

1967 Porsche 912 Karmann Coupe

As prices for well maintained and/or restored long-hood 911s continue to soar, my thoughts always drift back to the 912. The same style and the same driving dynamics, but turned down a notch, all for quite a bit less money in today’s market. And that is the basic story of the 912’s life: an entry-level Porsche for those hoping to get a taste of the marque, but without making huge sacrifices in quality nor performance. As with any car that’s approaching 50 years of age, the numbers of quality examples dwindle with each passing year and the cost of entry goes up. For now, however, the 912 still comes at a quite reasonable cost. The car featured here is a restored 1967 Porsche 912 Karmann Coupe located in California. It no longer wears its original color of Irish Green, but still looks excellent here in Polo Red over a Tan interior.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 Porsche 912 Karmann Coupe on eBay