Back Again: 1978 Volkswagen Scirocco

Is it April 1st yet? I thought it might be based upon the number of vehicles I’ve previously written up that are back up for sale this week. Sure enough, this is a Scirocco we’ve seen before more than once; last time back in early February as a revisit. Though it looked nice, that time around this Scirocco sported some BMW wheels and some not-hugely flattering photos. It sold for a touch over $6,100. Well, if you wanted it that time, the joke is on you – the car is back with some more fitting Rial wheels, a new set of photos, and a healthy price bump:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Volkswagen Scirocco on eBay

Coupe Week Double Take: 1977 and 1978 Volkswagen Sciroccos

Just because you want to partake in Coupe Week doesn’t mean that you have to have the deepest pockets. For a modest investment, you can get top-notch designer styling mated to a reliable and economical engine that’s still fun to drive. That’s certainly what Volkswagen sought to achieve with the introduction of its Giugiaro-styled Scirocco. While based upon the pedestrian mechanicals of the sibling Golf/Rabbit, the Scirocco capitalized on a sportier look but was backed up by a substantial racing program undertaken by Volkswagen to promote the car. Despite good looks and a devoted following though, the Scirocco unfortunately has fallen a victim to time, the tin worm and low residual value, meaning few remain in pristine shape unlike the more expensive coupes from Stuttgart and Munich. So it was a special treat when two of our readers sent in dueling 1978 and 1977 Sciroccos this week; one original and one rebuilt. Which is the winner?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Volkswagen Scirocco on The Samba

1982 Volkswagen Jetta Coupe

For many years, my trips to Lime Rock Park in the Coupe GT for Patroon Chapter BMWCCA driver’s events were accompanied by a similar soul; there was a ’84 Volkswagen Jetta GLi that seemed to always be joining me. On paper, the two were probably quite similar in terms of all-out speed; the Jetta had less power, but was also quite a bit lighter than the Coupe. But in fast corners, the better balance of the GT and equal-length driveshafts meant it was a bit easier to carry speed and get power down. Over the years, we both modified our cars in turn. I went to a Ground Control coilover suspension and steadily upgraded the engine and he followed suit. Squint a bit, and in the first generation Jetta you can see the similarities to the Audi GT. Both were Giugiaro designs as was the original Golf/Rabbit; but the Jetta went slightly upscale compared to the Golf. Ironically, in recent years that role has reversed – top of the range Golfs are even more expensive than mid-range Passats. But in the early 1980s, Volkswagen made the U.S. market A1 Jetta have slightly better interiors and, aside from the obvious trunk, a different grill with 4 rectangular sealed-beam headlights led the way – very similar to the U.S. spec Audi GT. They were available in 2 or 4-door configuration with a range of motors which matched the Rabbit; trim levels were base “L”, upscale “GL” and performance oriented “GLi”. Today, Jettas are far less common to come across than the more popular Rabbit variants, especially when they’re in the condition of this Inari Silver example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Volkswagen Jetta Coupe on eBay

Feature Listing Updates – New Lower Prices on Survivor GTi and Low Mile Corrado

The seller of the two recent fan-favorite Volkswagens has been in touch and lowered the price on both offerings; the GTi is now listed at $6,500 and the Corrado is listed at $12,500. He’s included links to more photos on each car, as well.

You can contact the seller if you’re interested directly at jimmyzslc@yahoo.com.

Click Here For The GTI Post

Year: 1984
Model: GTi
Engine: 1.8 liter inline-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 104,500 mi
Price: $6,500

Click Here For Additional GTI Photos

Click Here For The Corrado Post

Year: 1992
Model: Corrado SLC
Engine: 2.8 liter VR6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 36,750 mi
Price: $12,500

Click Here For Additional Corrado Photos

-Carter…

1984 Volkswagen GTi

It’s not often that lightning strikes twice, but today we get to look at another well preserved first generation GTi. Last week I highlighted an example with a bit more patina but well presented; today’s car is another one that we’ve written up that defies belief. There’s a reason that these cars are so well regarded by the automotive press and automotive fans; they’re amazing cars that make you smile. They punch far outside of their weight class – a do-everything automobile, most people that have owned them (this author included) drove them with aplomb – clipping apexes and lifting wheels, nearly daily redline-runs and antagonizing every “sports” car you could find. That likely explains why so few remain in the condition of this car:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Volkswagen GTi on eBay

1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Truck Turbo Diesel

What price would you be willing to pay for perfection? For most people, restoring a car is more a labor of love than a prudent investment. First there’s the massive amount of time that you need to invest to make the car right; presuming it doesn’t have massive body damage or corrosion, even what many would consider only a reasonable paint job will still cost thousands of dollars. Then there are the countless trim items that need to be replaced, seats and carpeting. Do them right and you’re looking at several thousand dollars more. Move to the suspension, brakes and drive line and another few thousand dollars will be gone. At the end, you’ll receive a disproportionately small amount of kudos for the large amount of effort and cash that you’ve infused into your project. But, it’s a labor of love – so it doesn’t matter that no one else appreciates your work, right? That’s why it’s so strange when these projects go up for sale:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Volkswagen Rabbit Truck Turbo Diesel on eBay

1984 Volkswagen GTi

Isn’t it amazing how far cars have come? Just yesterday, I was walking with my wife and we were talking about the cost of living today versus when our parents were our age. Certain things are significantly more expensive proportionate to what income was then; housing, for example, and utilities are – at least where we live – much more expensive than when our parents were young. In the early 1980s, the housing market was such that an average amount of money today would have bought you a real mansion – or in some cases, you could have easily owned two or three houses for the same amount as a not particularly extravagant home today. But then you turn to computers, phones, and music technology – remember the CD collection that you used to have? Or perhaps it’s taking up shelf space or boxes in the attic while you walk around with all of the music you can ever listen to on a device that’s smaller than your hand and cost only about a fifth of what a CD player cost new. But technology hasn’t just improved our musical library – technology has made cars safer, faster, and more luxurious – but amazingly, not more expensive. Sure, the dollar figures are higher and it’s worth a laugh looking at the original sticker price of this GTi; a paltry $10,300 in 1984. You can’t even buy a new car for that amount today! Of course, factor in inflation, though, and that $10,300 roughly equates to the best part of $24,000. Guess how much a base GTi costs today? I’ll save you some time….$24,395 gets you a base GTi. But base doesn’t mean what it used to – the “base” model comes with a 210 horsepower turbocharged inline-4, LED foglights, 18″ wheels, iPod connectivity, a touch screen radio, trip computer, and heated front seats – not to mention that things like power windows, air condition and power steering are all standard items now.…

1984 Volkswagen GTi – REVISIT

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The 1984 GTi with a cool G60/turbo engine setup and some great Recaros and BBSs is back up for sale a little over a month after I first wrote it up. With some details fixed like the corner lights and some better photos, you can see some of the work that needs to be completed to finish out this GTi – something that’s much more realistic now that the price has dropped a substantial $2,500 to a nice round $6,000. I think it should go this time around!

-NR

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Volkswagen GTi on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site September 2, 2014:

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Volkswagen projects slowly left my mind as I got more into classic M-cars, but the concept of interchangeable parts and endless custom possibilities made VWs take the place of sheep each night through many of my early car-loving years. A 1984 GTI with a nice swap has always been high on the dream list, and the G60 provides a solid platform that’s a little more contemporaneous and fitting than the VR6 or 1.8T ideas. Despite unassuming aesthetics, this GTI G60 has had the full workover with revised running gear, a turbocharger instead of the normal super, and some desirable exterior items. The “needs” items are few but give the impression this is a project he needs to get rid of, and projects can be a hard thing to transfer.

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Year: 1984
Model: GTI
Engine: 1.8 liter turbocharged inline-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: Unknown
Price: $6,000 Buy It Now

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Up for sale is my recently built 1984 GTi with Turbo G60 setup.

1984 GTi
61,099 miles/ Odometer not working. Unsure of actual mileage.
No rust
New brakes all around w/ stainless braided lines & new hard lines
Raceland coilovers
Eurosport rear strut bar
New control arms and bushings
New gas tank

Engine:
55k original mile G60 with mild rebuild.

Tuner Tuesday Zender Edition: Tuner Accessories Roundup

Zender is one of those names that I really identify with the 1980s. While they continued on after, the real height of Zender’s popularity seemed to be in the 1980s. Body kits, wheels and even steering wheels ultimately resulted in a tuning firm that was able to produce a few of their own show cars; remember the Zender Fact 4 and Vision? Today there are a host of real and copy Zender pieces floating around – here’s a sampling of what I was able to find on Ebay. While the styling may be a bit polarizing, it’s hard to deny that Zender offered customers something unique and having period detail pieces like these can really set your car apart if done properly:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Zender E24 front spoiler on eBay

1984 Volkswagen GTi

There’s a “meme” circulating the halls of the interweb that strikes particularly close to home for me. It depicts a few images of cars – the first one being a total loss, and the last one being absolutely mint and perfect and the description reads “How I view the dent on my car” under the wrecked image and “how my friends view my car” under the mint condition photo. It’s true; all three cars that live at my home are generally considered by many to be “ridiculously” clean, but I can tell you every nick, scratch and dent on all three without even leaving this computer. I’m guessing I’m not alone and that some of you also have the same “problem”, but if not please let me know and my family will be happy to commit me. Either way, when I see this 1984 GTi, my initial response is thrill over such a great looking example – until I see that dent on the hood. Now, it’s all I can see. I can look at the back of the car and still see it there, as if I’m some sort of demented used-car Superman with dent-ray vision. It’s sad, because otherwise there’s a lot like with this GTi:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1984 Volkswagen GTi on eBay