1991 Audi V8 quattro 5-speed – REVISIT

If last week’s ’93 V8 quattro wasn’t rare enough for you, I’m kicking it up a notch today. Back in March, a rare bird in the German car world popped up – one of the original 5-speed V8 quattros came up for sale, and unlike most it was in excellent condition. However, with 181,000 miles on the clock and an asking price which was semi-astounding at $17,500, it was no real surprise that it didn’t sell. Fast forward to today, and that lovely example is back up on the block with a massively cut asking price to $10,499. That’s still very strong money for a D11, but all things considered if you want an original 5-speed V8 quattro in good condition, there just aren’t many options for you. I think it’s still unlikely to find a buyer this round, but my guess is it’s getting close and there are a bunch of V8 quattro fans biting their lips right now…

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi V8 quattro 5-speed on eBay

The below post originally appeared on our site March 27, 2015:

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1990 Audi V8 quattro

I have a fun ongoing exchange with our reader John; we send each other pretty much every V8 quattro that comes to the market in the U.S., usually accompanied by some brutally honest and laughable one-liner. Considering the number of V8 quattros imported – less than 4000 – and that they were both expensive and a DTM star, they would have been coveted like the rest of the Audi lineup. Yet, many have fallen into extreme disrepair or neglect, leaving precious few left running today and making good ones a rare find. For example, recently John sent me a pretty worn Pearlesant White ’93 model with the line: ” ‘cheap’ and haven’t seen it before, but that’s about it”. I responded that I’d done the “cheap” V8 route before, and that were I to do it again I would have been better off spending three times as much to get a maintained example. The V8 is truly a car that could bankrupt you trying to restore a poor one to original condition. However, if you find a reasonable example that’s well priced, is it a better proposition?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi V8 quattro on eBay

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1991 Audi V8 quattro 5-speed

Up through 1995, Audi really liked to do things differently. Since then, they have perhaps become a bit more mainstream – but there are plenty of examples of their unconventional engineering before then. It was even a bit of a joke, with some enthusiasts lovingly (or not so much) using the Audi name for the acronym “Always Unusual Designs Incorporated”. One of my favorite unusual Audi stories, though, must by the development of the Audi V8 race car. Audi looked at what Mercedes-Benz and BMW did in the DTM and said “Sure, we can do that. But, we’ll use our full sized luxury-oriented car”. Then, to add insult to injury, they left the wood trim in the race cars as a reminder that this was their top-tier car. And, of course, you’d assume it would lose to the self-proclaimed most successful race car ever made, the E30 M3. But, it didn’t. It won the championship in both 1990 and 1991. Ever since then, I’ve had a bit of a love affair with the Audi V8 quattro, if for no other reason than it was not the normal choice. Rare to see even when new and quite expensive, nearly all of the 3,868 imported were automatics – a new and important development for bringing Audi to a larger market. But for 72 of those cars, the experience was quite different:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi V8 quattro 5-speed on eBay

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1991 Audi V8 quattro 5-speed

In 1989, Audi was in a state of crisis in the U.S.. The 60 Minutes farce had caused them serious market share from the European import scene. Audi had always been a bit fringe with its expensive and seemingly underpowered turbocharged all-wheel drive executive sedans. Aside from that, the major competition had stepped up their game; BMW launched the quite attractive and popular E32 the year before, and upstarts Infinity from Nissan with their Q45 and Lexus from Toyota with what would become the standard – the LS400 – were entering the marketplace. While the BMW remained with its standard inline-6 rear-drive configuration in most E32s sold, the Japanese duo upped the game with powerful quad-cam aluminum V8s under the hood. In the case of the Lexus, Toyota steered towards refinement with adequate power – Nissan, on the other hand, pushed the performance level with a reported 280 horsepower cap on the 4.5 liter VH54DE engine which today many report as underrated by at least 30 horsepower. Audi had its work cutout to claw back market share against these new cars, and to answer it released an updated version of the venerable Type 44/C3 chassis. Now, truth told the Audi 100 (5000 U.S.) really was the basis for the design of most of the large executive sedans that followed – but five years after its introduction, being the first was no longer enough. Audi upped the game by introducing what effectively was two Volkswagen 16Vs mated to each other in the same way that the 944 engine was effectively half of a 928 V8. The new V8 was all-aluminum and featured double-overhead cams. It was small – twice the displacement of the Volkswagen 16V engine at the time at 3.6 liters, but produced about the same power as the 4.0 liter Lexus motor. New too was the transmission in the now named “V8 quattro”, with a 4-speed automatic gearbox coupled to all four wheels through a rear Torsen differential and a multi-plate clutch center differential. The automatic was necessary to compete with the crowd that was buying these large executive sedans, as was the upgraded interior with a new dashboard, more sound deadening and more electronics. Of course, if you still wanted to shift gears yourself, Audi offered what many consider to be one of the best on-the-fly all-wheel drive setups ever to make it to the road; the 5-speed V8 quattro featured a center and rear Torsen differential. Less than 100 made it to U.S. shores in 3.6 form only, making these complicated executive sedans sought out by Audi enthusiasts across the country:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi V8 quattro 5-speed on motorgeek

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10K Friday: A44ordable Audis – 5000CS quattro Avant v. 5000S quattro v. V8 quattro v. 100 quattro

The Type 44 Audi was an impressive advance for German automobiles, a huge leap forward for Audi in a new marketplace – but also nearly the cause of its demise. It was an aerodynamic, futuristic sedan when both BMW and Mercedes-Benz seemed to be producing cars stuck in the 1970s. It was the blueprint for most modern luxury sedans from not only German companies, but many of the advances were copied by the Japanese, Italians and Americans for their large sedans. Yet, by 1990 Audi nearly pulled out of the American market thanks to some creative journalism from 60 Minutes, who in their effort to prove Audi was at fault for some unintended acceleration cases nearly killed off the company entirely. In part as a result of their efforts, it’s become quite rare to find clean examples of them today – but it’s also because they were such good, long-lived and solidly built machines that few have lower miles today. While I recent featured a few 20V turbocharged examples in the 20V Turbo comparison, today we’ll look at a few of the lesser appreciated examples, starting with a clean 5000CS quattro Avant in Canada:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Audi 5000CS Quattro Avant on Hemmings

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Fan Favorites: 1990 Audi Coupe, 1991 Audi V8 3.6 quattro 5-speed and 1995 Audi S6 Avant

Audi fans are an interesting bunch. To be fair, I think that most devoted followers of a specific brand in any circumstance are an interesting bunch, but knowing the Audi folks a bit I’m closer to the understanding. What I find interesting is that there’s such a schism between the model fans and who they attract. Each has a devoted following, and each of those groups is a microcosm in and of itself. Take my model group, for example – the Type 85. In that model group, there are the three major notables: the 4000 quattro, the Coupe GT, and of course the Quattro. Then within each of those subsets, there are further fan specializations; 84 4000S quattro versus the 85-87; early GT versus 85-87 and then the “87.5” crew; and of course each one of the model years of the Quattro has its followers. As with the GT, Audi fans have come to naming half model years to differentiate the upgrades; 87.5 GTs received a revised engine and brakes along with some other minor details, but then there are “95.5” S6s and “2001.5” S4s; heck, there are even “2005.5” S4s. Fans become semi-obsessed with differentiating each of the subset models and what makes them special. Today, though, seeing any of these cars in great shape is special to me – and these three each have their special fan base. Thanks to our reader John, here’s a roundup of three fan favorites that are sure to make some smile:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi Coupe Quattro on craigslist

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Hidden Pearls Double Take: 1991 Audi V8 3.6 quattro 5-speed and 1994 V8 4.2 quattro

Like the closest counterparts, the BMW M3/M5 and the Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.3 16v/500E, the Audi V8 quattro has long enjoyed a cult following. Unlike those other cars, though, finding a decent V8 quattro these days is quite tough. First, not many were imported – a few thousand may sound like a lot, but it’s less than the total number of E30 M3s imported, for example, by a long shot. By the time they got to their last production year, only a few hundred of the super-sedans were imported. Second, because they’re complicated, older cars that lost a lot of their value in the 1990s, many fell into states of disrepair. Over its short life, the Audi V8 underwent numerous changes; from the introductory options of automatic or manual, the 3.6 liter quad-cam all-aluminum V8 pumped a respectable 240 horsepower but by the end of the run the automatic-only 4.2 liter displacement bump resulted in nearly 280 horsepower. Sure, that’s small potatoes today, but outside of the limited Sport Quattro, these were the most powerful production Audis made before 1995. Today we’ll take a look at two of the more desirable models for different reasons – a 3.6 5-speed and a late 4.2 model, both Pearlesant White with Grey Connolly leather

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi V8 3.6 quattro 5-speed on Craigslist

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1991 Audi V8 Quattro – REVISIT

The 1991 Audi V8 quattro from last fall is still available from Windy City Motorsports, now with a price lowered to $3,900. While these cars certainly need a healthy dose of maintenance to run reliably, at below $4,000 you’re not likely to find one in better condition for less money. This is certainly a cheaper way to live your DTM dreams than jumping into a 190E 2.3-16 or M3 these days!

The below post originally appeared on our site November 13 and December 22, 2013:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Audi V8 Quattro on eBay

If you read my last V8 quattro post during V8 week, you’d understand the love/hate relationship I have with the V8 Quattro. It’s been nearly a decade on from parting company with my 1994 4.2 V8, and while it’s true we didn’t always have the best relationship it’s the car that I miss the most out of those I’ve owned. Every time that one comes up for sale I ponder how much it would take to get it into nice condition; and then, every once in a while, a nice one pops up! Such was the case with the 1990 I wrote up for V8 week, and while that car was probably overpriced (and is still for sale), today it’s 1991 twin has come up for sale at a more reasonable price. In period correct and perfect Pearlesant Metallic over grey Connolly leather comfort seats – pretty much the only optional extras available on the V8 – today’s example is taunting me:

Year: 1991
Model: V8 Quattro
Engine: 3.6 liter V8
Transmission: 4-speed automatic
Mileage: 106,000 mi
Price: $3,900 Buy It Now

Vehicle Overview
We at Windy City Motorsports are very pleased to offer for sale this super clean 1991 Audi V8 Quattro luxury sedan.

***Very Hard To Find

***3.6L V8 Powerplant

***Legendary Audi Quattro All Wheel Drive System

***Rust Free West Coast Car

***Beautiful Pearl White Exterior

***Non-Smoker Gray Leather Cabin

***Original BBS Mesh Wheels

***Eclipse Detachable Face CD Player W/Ipod & USB Inputs

***Heated Leather Seats

***Carfax Certified Vehicle!

*******Free Nationwide Shipping & Rear View Camera System Are Included In The BUY IT NOW Price!

***Facetime Or Tango Users Please Contact Us For A “Virtual Walk-Around”

***Financing Is Available For all Types Of Credit

***Inexpensive Nationwide / Worldwide Delivery Is Our Specialty!

***Rear View Mirror Mounted Back Up Camera System Shown Can Be Installed For Only $299. System Includes Night Vision Camera, Remote, AUX Input For DVD Systems & Much More.

***We sincerely appreciate your interest, and as a trusted eBay award winning seller since 1999, we hope to add you to our quickly growing family of 7,600+ satisfied customers.

Having spent many a day cleaning those original BBS wheels, seeing them in good condition is very refreshing. The BBSs were quite light and a nice upgrade from the original “Aero” wheels 1991 on to 1994. The condition of this car looks to be near perfect, and if you’re interested in a V8 Quattro that’s what you want. As with the last one, you’d want to make sure to check if there are maintenance records – specifically, the timing belt service should have been completed. I see a missing headlight wiper, but that’s not really the end of the world. The early V8s are noted for vacuum leaks and oil leaks, so you’ll want to check for those – and the automatic is fairly trusty but you’d probably want to service that, too. This would be a perfect candidate for a 5 speed swap out of a 200 20V, or go crazy and pop in a 4.2 40V motor out of an A8 and a 01E 6-speed if you want a true sleeper. In stock form, the 3.6 with the automatic is underwhelming around town but fun on the highway. $5,900 may seem like a lot for an older Audi, but finding a V8 in this condition is just about impossible – and I think this one is well worth it!

-Carter

Motorsport Monday: A duo of crazy quattros – 1990 Audi 90s

Want to get into motorsport but lacking the budget to pick up a budget-racer like the Porsche 912 I wrote up earlier? Perhaps you own that 912, and just don’t want to trash it? Well, there are plenty of fun alternatives, and not all of them are on the beaten path. Take today’s twin 90s, for example. One has all the fun stuff to go through corners, and the other gets you there more quickly. Which would you prefer? Let’s start with the carver:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Coupe Quattro on craigslist

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A V8 for every production year – 1990-1994 Audi V8 Quattros

I’m not going to hide my love of the Audi V8 quattro. It was one of the most challenging cars I have ever owned, but it was also the one that I find myself still looking at and wanting in spite of the many repairs and several headaches. I’ve like the V8 quattro since it first came out; a hunkered down, V8 engined, heavily modified 200 quattro, it managed to feel almost nothing like the C3 chassis it was based on. Audi seemed to agree, renaming the V8 “D11”, effectively creating a new chassis class despite the nearly identical dimensions to the 200 that ran alongside the V8. Recently I wrote up a first year 4.2 V8 quattro that was in great shape, evoking memories of both my ownership and the DTM series that Audi dominated with the slightly portly but very powerful V8 quattro. Today, I’ve decided to round up all of the model years; we’ll cover 1990-1994 V8s that are currently for sale. Let’s start where it all began:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1990 Audi V8 Quattro on Portland Craiglist

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