Feature Listing: 2006 Porsche Cayman S

Feature Listing: 2006 Porsche Cayman S

I sometimes feel I am neglectful of the Porsche Cayman. I write almost exclusively about Porsches and it turns out equally exclusively about the 911. This is by choice, not necessarily by design. The Cayman is (in relative terms) the new kid on the block for Porsche so it doesn’t always possess the sort of historicity that remains rooted in my brain. In simpler terms: these were not the Porsches that captivated me as a kid; not the Porsches that I saw on posters and dreamed about. All of this may be to my loss.

The Cayman is a fantastic car possessing inherently better dynamic balance than its much more well known sibling, the 911. Porsche has been oft criticized for holding the Cayman back, portrayed as fearful that it would overtake their beloved 911, but that doesn’t make the Cayman a family sedan. Impeccable balance, impeccable feel, and still plenty of power for everyday use characterize the chassis. In S specification with a 6-speed manual transmission you’re getting nearly 300 horses propelling a car weighing just over 3,000 pounds. That’s good for 0-60 in around 5 seconds and should you so desire you’ll top out north of 170 mph – not too shabby. There really is a lot to love with these cars and here we have one that comes from the very beginning: an Indischrot 2006 Porsche Cayman S with Sand Beige leather interior and just 31,000 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Porsche Cayman S at Eurowerkz

1989 Porsche 944 Turbo with 36,000 Miles

1989 Porsche 944 Turbo with 36,000 Miles

Where does the 944 Turbo lie in the collector market? That’s a fantastic question. For such a limited model produced over a relatively short span of time, there’s an amazing array of models and changes that occurred over the run that alter the car’s perception, the car’s performance, and – most importantly – the car’s value.

Starting in 1985, the “951” took the idea which had been pioneer with the 924 Turbo and Carrera GT/GTS/GTR and brought it to a much larger audience in a much easier to digest package. Every successive model year saw some changes, from the addition of anti-lock braking in 1987 to the upgraded “S” package in 1988, replete with Cup-inspired Koni suspension and turned-up engine performance for near 250 horsepower. This package carried over, largely unchanged minus the deletion of the S designation, for the entire 1989 model year in the U.S.. Of course, the power, performance and package of the 944 Turbo immediately brings it into comparison with the other two revolutionary small displacement sports cars of the time; the BMW M3 and the Audi Quattro. Each had their own unique character, each has their heavily devoted, mind-can’t-be-changed-that-they-were-the-best-ever fact sheets, and each has their flaws. So how to they stack up in the market today?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 944 Turbo on eBay

Litmus Test: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S with 37,700 Miles

Litmus Test: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S with 37,700 Miles

Following up on Rob’s “presence” post about the 928, here we have the embodiment of presence and speed in the 944 Turbo S. But we have much more than that, too, in this particular example.

As I talked about at length in the last 1988 Turbo S post, there was a lot that made this car more special than the regular Turbo – and, arguably, more special than the 911, too. But the market on 944 Turbos has been all over the map, with nice examples struggling to break $10,000 at times and excellent examples three to four times that. So where does this Turbo S lie?

Well, we have a great combination of factors that make it quite desirable. First, it’s one of the S models. Second, it’s a claimed one owner car that appears to be close to 100% original. Third, it’s got very low mileage, with only 37,700 accrued. But the coup de grâce that beheads the typical unrealistic asks in the Porsche world is that this is a no reserve auction. Rarely do we get to see all of these things combine and get a real feel for the market.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S on eBay

1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S Silver Rose

1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S Silver Rose

Porsche is famous for launching a special edition just about every six minutes, and in the late 1980s they launched quite a few for 1988. First off, they created a special edition of the 944 Turbo. The new option M758 “Turbo S” included a new turbocharger with redesigned vanes and a remapped DME which increased boost to a max of 1.82 bar. The resulting M44/52 had 30 more horsepower and 15 lb.ft torque to a max of 247 and 258, respectively. But the “S” package was far more than just more boost, as the cooling system was revised, the clutch and transmission were beefed up with hardened first and second gears.

Brakes were borrowed from the 928 S4 and now measured 12″ in front with four piston aluminum calipers. Wheels were Club Sport 16″ forged, polished and anodized units measuring 7 inches in front and 9 in the rear. Suspension was also beefed up with the M030 package; this included adjustable rebound Koni shocks and adjustable perch coilovers in front. Limited slip differentials (Code 220) were not standard, but a must-select option.

Within the already limited edition S (of which about 1,900 were shipped to the US), there was another special edition. The “Silver Rose” launch cars took all of the special aspects of the M758 S package and added a unique color (Silver Rose Metallic, LM3Z) and a very unique Burgundy Studio Check interior. Outside of the Turbo Cup cars, these very limited original models have become the most desirable of the 944 Turbos:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 944 Turbo S on eBay

2012 Porsche Panamera S

2012 Porsche Panamera S

I paid a visit to the local Porsche dealer over the long weekend to check out the wares, specifically the Macan S. As great as the PDK transmission is, I would still prefer the Macan with a 6-speed manual gearbox. Given that is not on the option list, it has fallen down a few notches on the list of potentials for my second vehicle. One car that was available for a time with a manual gearbox of which few are aware is the Panamera. After it first debuted, certain rear-drive models, including this Panamera S for sale on the western border of Germany near Saarbrücken were available with a 6-speed manual. Few, if any, Panameras made it to the US with three pedals. I personally have yet to come across one. Even still, in Europe, these big sedans so equipped are rare.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2012 Porsche Panamera on Mobile.de

Porsche Exclusive: 2016 Porsche Macan S

Porsche Exclusive: 2016 Porsche Macan S

My disdain for the common SUV is well documented here on GCFSB, but a funny thing happened in 2014. Porsche released the Macan. At first glance, I wrote this car off as a smaller Cayenne. And yes, I’ll call this a car because anyone who has seen one in real life knows about its compact dimensions. My attraction to the Macan has grown over time to the point that I would be tempted to pull the trigger if a 6-speed manual were available. I’m not writing off the perfectly fine 7-speed PDK transmission, but three pedals is really how I’d prefer my car to be configured, especially if I’m going to drop down this much coin. Nevertheless, after a discussion with my father, the Macan is a serious contender to replace my mother’s trusty 17 year old C-class. So maybe a Porsche will finally wind up in the family somewhere after all. If you’re looking to be shouty about your P-car purchase, check out this Macan S for sale painted in a vibrant Paint to Sample hue of Gulf Orange.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2016 Porsche Macan S on Cars.com

1989 Porsche 944 Turbo with 37,000 Miles

1989 Porsche 944 Turbo with 37,000 Miles

Kicking and screaming, enthusiasts are watching super heros from the 1980s slowly (or not so slowly, depending on the model) move firmly out of affordable price ranges. The last bastion of performance to rise is one of the best available, proving that the market doesn’t always recognize what theoretically should be the best cars. 944 Turbos, just as they did when new, have been rapidly accelerating in value and the top of the heap for road models are the ’88 Turbo S and the S-spec ’89 Turbos (properly, without S – more later). In my time writing for GCFSB, I’ve watched nice examples move from mid-teens to firmly into the 20K range. But Hagerty currently values them even higher, with a sharp spike in 2015. 2016 forecasts have the market cooling slightly, but it’s still at record highs for several models. The current top value on a 1989, at least according to Hagerty, is $36,400. Today’s car is priced at $39,000. Is it better than perfect?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 944 Turbo on eBay

1995 Porsche 9m93 Speedster S

1995 Porsche 9m93 Speedster S

The great thing about the car hobby is there seems to be an almost endless stream of imagination from tuners and coachbuilders when it comes to concepts and limited production vehicles. One car in recent memory that sticks out in my mind is the Porsche 993 Speedster. Or the lack thereof. This was never officially offered by Porsche, but two were produced, one for Ferdinand Porsche and another for Jerry Seinfeld, comedian and noted Porsche collector. This hasn’t stopped people from trying to emulate those rare 911s. Ninemeister is a company based in the United Kingdom noted for its custom Porsches, and this 1995 Speedster happens to be one of them. With air-cooled Porsche popularity soaring, especially for the final batch of 993s, this could be considered one of the ultimate expressions of classic 911s.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 Porsche 9m93 Speedster S at Hexagon Classics

2004 MINI Cooper S MC40

2004 MINI Cooper S MC40

Almost five years on, every time I slip behind the wheel of my 2006 MINI Cooper S, it still puts a smile on my face. I remember the first time I drove one of these supercharged pocket rockets almost a decade ago. I thought to myself “someday, you’ll be mine.” After four years of running a 2007 Mercedes-Benz C230, I finally had enough of the 7-speed automatic AKA the gearbox with a personality disorder. I was lusting after something more fun, and with a manual gearbox. And seeing how much my father enjoyed his 2002 MINI Cooper, I went to work in search of a final year R53 Cooper S. It’s been a fairly trouble free ownership experience and I don’t see myself selling it anytime soon.

Two years before the R53 hardtop disappeared, MINI payed homage to their past with the Cooper S MC40. Dedicated to Mini’s historic win at the Monte Carlo Rally in 1964, this car was equipped with the Sport Package, driving lights, special interior trim, magnetic body decals and a numbered plaque with Paddy Hopkirk’s signature. One color was offered, Chili Red with a White roof. This MC40 for sale in Florida has just over 60,000 miles. Even with the limitless color and trim combinations MINI offers, this special edition is a good way to stand out from the crowd.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 MINI Cooper S MC40 on eBay

Feature Listing: 1987 Porsche 944S

Feature Listing: 1987 Porsche 944S

In the late 1980s, the front-engined Porsche lineup started to get a bit convoluted – especially amongst the 4 cylinder variants. In 1986, you could choose between the the base 944 with the 150 horsepower 2.5 liter inline-4 8 valve motor that had reinvigorated the revised 924 chassis into the 944 for 1982, or if you were gunning for the big boys you could select the 217 horsepower Turbo model. To bridge the gap in performance between the two, Porsche introduced a mid-range model in 1987; the 944S. Based in part on the development of the 924 and 944 GTR Le Mans race cars from a few years earlier, the M44.40 double overhead cam 16 value motor split the difference between the two previous offerings; essentially half the 928S motor, the new “Super” produced 190 horsepower slotting itself almost perfectly in the middle of the other two offerings. Added to the S were a host of Turbo items, including springs and parts of the brake system, as well as some exotic parts such as the use of magnesium in the engine bay to keep weight down. Outside, only discrete “16 Ventiler” badges on the front fender trim differentiated that this was a special model. Coupled with the reintroduction of the 924S model, Porsche now offered four different variants of the 4-cylinder transaxle cars for enthusiasts of differing budgets. The 944S’s base price was around $5,000 more dear than the 924S, but it was considerable $8,000 less than the Turbo model’s base price. Add some options in and these 944Ss could easily crest $30,000, around what it would have cost you to walk out of the dealer with this particular example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 944S on Cleveland Craigslist

Motorsports Monday: 1974 Porsche 911S SCCA B Production

Motorsports Monday: 1974 Porsche 911S SCCA B Production

Getting into the world of historic Porsche race cars is fairly easy. All you really need to do is have a seriously large bank account, and virtually any day of the week a historically important factory race car will be for sale somewhere in the world. What that means most recently in the market is that when you’re viewing those great classic 911 silhouettes from Spa and Le Mans to Laguna Seca and Watkins Glen at classic motorsports events is that you’re looking at – at minimum – multi-hundred thousand dollar vehicles with multi-hundred thousand dollar restorations being run on liquified trust funds. The costs of running vintage cars hard are simply staggering. However, there’s a second tier of vehicles that gets you accepted into the lofty Elysium of vintage racers – period cars that were run by privateers. Today’s 911S is one such car; built in period and raced against the full factory efforts, it has some pretty significant names and achievements attached to it:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1974 Porsche 911 SCCA B Production Race Car on eBay

1980 Volkswagen Scirocco S

1980 Volkswagen Scirocco S

I’m going to get a bit gushy for a moment, if you’ll allow me. I love the original Scirocco. Considering I’m a huge fan of the similarly Giugiaro designed Audi Coupe, that should come as no surprise. Both the GT and the Scirocco have some odd angles, and arguable aren’t the prettiest designs ever to be penned by the Italians. However, it’s that awkwardness that adds to their appeal for me – they stand out not because they’re perfect, but because simply they stand out and not in a bad way. It’s something that the second generation Scirocco wasn’t able to pull off, in my mind. The short and squat original model, though it lacked the performance of many of the top-tier Volkswagen products, has to go down as one of the prettiest Volkswagens ever made. While they were a popular coupe and in many ways helped to spawn the sedan-based 2-door market that was the rage in the 1980s and early 1990s, not many of the original Sciroccos remain thanks mostly to rust and electrical issues. To me, the best looking of the original models are the infrequently seen “S” models, such as the 1980 which popped up this week for sale. The S was mostly an appearance package but featured a front spoiler, some cool stripes and Recaro seats; it was also only available in three colors in 1980 – black, Mars Red or today’s Alpine White:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1980 Volkswagen Scirocco S on eBay

10K Friday Practical Performance Edition: R32 v. S4 v. 330xi v. E500 Estate v. Cayenne Turbo

10K Friday Practical Performance Edition: R32 v. S4 v. 330xi v. E500 Estate v. Cayenne Turbo

Edit: Thanks to several readers for pointing out several details that prove this Cayenne is a Turbo, but not a Turbo S. Only 450 horsepower, then!

It’s been a few weeks since my last 10K Friday entry, and I wanted to get something together for the impending snow New England is once again expecting. To remind us of the terms of the comparison, I’m looking for themed cars around $10,000 (give or take, we’ll see later). I try to generally find the newest cars possible, figuring that for many these will be a daily driver. In this case, I was looking for performance all-wheel drive cars that offered year round practicality with a touch of sport. So lining up the best I could find from Volkswagen, Audi, Mercedes-Benz, BMW and Porsche gives us an interesting amount of diversity for your hard-earned dollars. Today we have two sedans, a hatchback, a wagon and a S.U.V. to contemplated; which is the winner?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2008 Volkswagen R32 on eBay

Double Take: 1978 and 1987 Volkswagen Sciroccos – REVISIT

Double Take: 1978 and 1987 Volkswagen Sciroccos – REVISIT

A few alumni from these pages popped up on eBay again, giving us the rare opportunity to compare two generations of Volkswagen Sciroccos for about the same money. The first is the original Scirocco; a 1978 example which has been thoroughly gone through and restored with some light modifications. The second is a second generation Scirocco in what appears to be all-original condition, but with total mileage unknown and a less desirable automatic. The last time the ’78 popped up, the auction ended at just over $7,000; strong money for an unoriginal car, but a witness to the large amount of work performed. The second was a no-sale, not surprising given the high opening bid price at $5,500. The recent sale of a first generation Scirocco with desirable modifications for over $22,000 has given some weight to these sporty coupes; will that sale help pull this ’78 up to a higher price than before? And the ’87 has been lowered to a “Buy It Now” of $4,500 – is that the right price?

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1978 Volkswagen Scirocco on eBay

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Volkswagen Scirocco on eBay

The below posts originally appeared on our site October 29, 2013 and November 14, 2014:

Motorsports Monday: Porsche 911 GT3 Cup v. Cayman S

Motorsports Monday: Porsche 911 GT3 Cup v. Cayman S

For German car fans who love racing, it doesn’t get much more exciting than Porsche’s long history of endurance racing. Indeed, Porsche’s venerable 911 seems intrinsically linked with racing – undoubtedly, part of its mystique. However, true factory racing Porsches have always been pretty expensive when new and still are so. Watching yesterday’s coverage of the 24 Hours of Daytona had me cringing as the multi-hundred thousand dollar Le Mans class 991 Porsches took each other out, attacked Opossums and exploded crankcases. It wasn’t a great day for Porsche at a track where the company has had an impressive string of successes. So, today I decided to take a look at two racing Porsches as an homage to their first rate engineering, their enduring appeal and incredible performance:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2014 Porsche 911 GT3 Cup on eBay