Feature Listing: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini World Championship Edition

Feature Listing: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini World Championship Edition

In 1976, Porsche won the World Sportscar Championship for makes with successful runs in both the 935 and prototype 936 chassis. The 936 was triumphant at Le Mans in the already famous Martini livery, while a series of 935/76s carried the colors in Group 5 FIA sports car racing. It was there that Porsche introduced the ‘slant nose’ aerodynamic bodywork that became the hot mod on 911s in the 1980s; however, in the 1970s you could get a very nice slantnose Porsche – replete with Martini Racing colors – for a lot less than a 911 Turbo.

To commemorate the success of the 1976 season, in 1977 Porsche released a limited run of Martini-colored 924s. Option M426 was the Martini World Championship Edition, and it cost $450. Add in a removable roof like this one for about $350, and the sticker price of this car just passed $10,000. For that sum, Porsche gave you quite a lot of visual enhancement; bathed only in pure white, the 924’s 8-spoke alloy wheels were color-matched to the body. Martini stripes ran the length of the sides, their design mimicking the wedge shape of the 924. Inside, a special two-tone interior of scarlet corduroy and black leatherette was offset with Martini stripes stitched into the upper portion of the seats and blue piping ran throughtout. A commemorative plaque was added to the back of the center console, too, reminding you that the car you were driving was from the house of a champion. You held a real leather steering wheel, and helping execute your commands was achieved by Porsche adding sway bars to the suspension both front and rear. It was a series of small changes that resulted in a neat package, and one that is sought by collectors of the transaxle design today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini Championship Edition on Hemmings

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

Why the enthusiast world hasn’t thoroughly warmed up to the Porsche 924S is a bit beyond me, and that’s especially true of the 1988 model year. Not only was compression slightly up resulting in 160 horsepower channeled through the rear wheels, but Porsche also signed the model out with a fantastic lightweight special. The 924S Special Edition was also marketed in Europe as the 924S Le Mans; limited to 500 copies in each market, the U.S. models were black only. In classic Porsche “add lightness” style, the 924S SE had manual windows, no air conditioning or sunroof, and they even dropped the passenger mirror off the car. While power didn’t increase, the car did get more suspension in the M030 factory Koni suspension and wider Phone Dials in the back with integrated mud flaps. Also lightweight was the interior fabric, which was so thin it doesn’t seem to be able to actually cover the seats even on a low mileage example like this:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition on eBay

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

The last 1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition I wrote up in November was an interesting one, as it languished in a second-hand dealer with low miles and recovered seats with a seller who was apparently unaware exactly what it was but was still asking close to top dollar. Well, the secret is out on that particular example, at least to some extent. Just before Christmas, the listing was updated from around $9,000 to just shy of $19,000 in order to account for the new description which listed the car as one of the 500 “Le Mans” edition cars. While the seller’s claim is semantically incorrect, it appears they finally did some research and figured out that this indeed was one of the Special Edition U.S. spec 924S models (as a reminder to those less versed in the 1988 924S model, the “Le Mans” edition was a European equivalent Club Sport model). While that car isn’t really realistically priced anymore, there’s another of these defacto Club Sport models on eBay right now in the same scenario – at least from the listing, the seller is unaware that it’s the Special Edition model:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition on eBay

Porsche 924 Roundup

Porsche 924 Roundup

The Porsche 924 represents some of the best aspects of automobile enthusiasts, while simultaneously embodying two distinct and very different decades. From the 1970s comes the upright, modernist and simple dashboard, but while it nods to the decade that bore it, the exterior is immediately identifiable as the 1980s signature silhouette with a low-slung, long hood, pronounced bumpers and flip-up headlights. Quite a few cars in the late 1970s and 1980s attempted to mimic the design of the 924, including the notable RX-7 and you could even argue the 280/300ZX. You can even see influence of the groundbreaking 924 design in the Miata of the late 1980s as well as such modern GT cars at the AMG GT-S. For enthusiasts, though, it was the near perfect weight distribution, the torquey inline-4, the manual gearbox and the all-important Porsche badge of engineering and build quality that led to the 924 being a hit. It didn’t hurt that it was the most affordable Porsche, either, and arguably still is so today. I’ve rounded up a group of 3 distinct and neat 924S models from late in the run to see which offers the most bang for your buck:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 924S “GT” on eBay

1988 Porsche 924SE

1988 Porsche 924SE

As we watch 911 and 928 prices from the 1980s soar and the 944 Turbo, long considered the go-to value of the Porsche world, has started the march up the valuation ladder, where is a budget-minded Porsche enthusiast to turn? Without a doubt, the best place to get your low-cost thrills still is the “poor man’s” 924. Spanning just over a decade in production, values on early 931 Turbo models have also started to creep up, but if you look you can still find a good value on the later and arguably better driving 924S models. Reintroduced in 1987 with the underpinnings of the 944, the 924S was a budget Porsche. While the roughly $23,000 entry price certainly wasn’t cheap in 1987 dollars, it wasn’t much more money than a similarly equipped Audi Coupe GT. Dynamically, there aren’t many differences between the 1987 and 1988 models; ’88s got a few more horsepower than the ’87s thanks to a compression bump, but otherwise they’re the same – that is, except for the limited run “SE” model, perhaps the absolute best value in the Porsche world right now:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 924SE on Phoenix Craigslist

337-off: 2002 Volkswagen GTis

337-off: 2002 Volkswagen GTis

Let’s discount, just for a moment, the reputation of the fourth generation water-cooled, front engined platform from Volkswagen. Yes, they’re known for not having the best build quality, and they were a bit pudgy. The electrics were sketchy and Volkswagen’s venerable 1.8T, which found its way into nearly every VAG product in the late 90s and early 00s, is certainly not without fault. But in many ways, the Mk.4 platform offered some exciting options for the Volkswagen faithful. First, the introduction of the turbocharged engine into the platform redefined the possibilities of the hot hatch. It was available not only in the top-spec GTi, but you could get a 4-door 1.8T, too – a first for Volkswagen, who had offered hot 4-door hatches in Europe but not the U.S. previously. Then, in 2002, Volkswagen upped its game even more with the introduction of the 25th Anniversary Edition in Europe. “But the GTi didn’t come out until 1983” U.S. fans said, forgetting that 1977 was the launch year of the 1.6 original in Europe. It seemed, for some time, that the U.S. would get snubbed again. After all, it wouldn’t be very smart for them to offer a 25th Anniversary Edition of a car that didn’t exist here, and “19th Anniversary” doesn’t have the same ring. But then, at the New York Auto Show in 2002, Volkswagen surprised U.S. fans by offering the near-identical package to them. The name was the GTi 337 Edition; the name harkened back to the original project code for the Golf GTi. Beefed up with 180 horsepower, a 6-speed manual, an awesome set of Recaro seats, aero tweaks and with some awesome shot-peened BBS RC wheels, it was an instant hit. Volkswagen sold 1,500 of these models to U.S. fans, and then when they had sold out, recreated the magic in 2003 with colorful options in the 20th Anniversary Edition.…

1989 Porsche 911 25th Anniversary Edition

1989 Porsche 911 25th Anniversary Edition

Of all the sports car manufacturers, I think Porsche loves special editions the most. Racing focused editions, touring editions, anniversary editions, they’ve done them all and they’ve done them well. I’m a big fan of the 991 50th Anniversary edition, I’d go so far as to say I think it’s the best looking 911 ever made but not necessarily the one I’d want over all others. That would be the 930 Turbo but these days I’d say I have a better chance of owning the former given where the market is headed. I suppose it makes sense then that I’m such a fan of this car, the 911 25th Anniversary Edition.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 911 25th Anniversary Edition

Rare Wasser Porsches: 1982 924 Turbo and 1988 924SE

Rare Wasser Porsches: 1982 924 Turbo and 1988 924SE

If for some time the Porsche 944 is one of the most under appreciated cars in the 1980s German car world, the 924 is even the more red-headed stepchild. But get past the stigma of the 924 as the “poor man’s Porsche”, and the details are quite good. They’re nice looking, aerodynamic coupes that are rear drive for enthusiasts. Like the rest of the Porsche lineup from the late 1970s and 1980s, they had great build quality overall and were solid products. Many of the “big brother” 944 items work on the 924, too – especially true in the later 924S models, so they can be updated and modified just like the 944s. They enjoyed a rich racing history in both naturally aspirated and turbocharged variants, with the first “Carrera GT” being a 924 model. Plus, the 924 was the development model which resulted in the much more prized 944 and 944 Turbo. And within the lineup, there are really some great hidden gems of classic cars that can be had on a budget. Today I have two nice examples of some of the rarer models of the 924; a late run 924 Turbo and a last of the breed 924S Special Edition:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1982 Porsche 924 Turbo on eBay

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

Pablo from flüssig magazine is back to highlight this late model, one of 500 1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition.

I have a thing for women with wide hips.

The cars that I have in my collection reflect this. The 993, 944, and 968; each of them sensually wide at the flanks giving them a sort of feminine muscularity you seldom see on other marques.

I also have a thing for narrow hips on the fairer sex…not taking a preference for one or the other is a testament to the dual personality that’s typical of all Geminis.

You see, even though the wide hips suggest strength, power if you like, the narrow ones speak of nimbleness, agility; a sort of lightness that gives her edge in all things calling for performance. This is precisely why I fell in love with this 924S.

This is not just any old 924S, however; no, no…this one is a very special version of which only 500 were made for the US market and they’re all clothed in black. In fact, very few Porschephiles know that such a version exists, yet here is one that’s got the numbers to prove it. First let me give you a little primer on the S before getting a bit more intimate with SN450529.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition on eBay

1988 Porsche 924S “Le Mans” Special Edition

1988 Porsche 924S “Le Mans” Special Edition

Porsche must be the king of obscure special models; it seems nearly every week there’s some limited edition model virtually no one has heard of comes up for sale, generally with some premium attached to the asking price because of their rarity. But while many of these limited edition cars didn’t make it to the United States, one that did was the special edition of the 924S. Sure, the 924S wasn’t the most popular car in the Porsche lineup and still isn’t, but it was a competent performer and sold reasonably well. 1988 saw the 924S bump up compression with a touch more horsepower, so if you’re in the market look for one of the already more rare to find 1988 editions. But if you want really rare, to celebrate its Le Mans victories Porsche launched a special edition of the 1988 model; dubbed the “924S SE” in the U.S. and “924S Le Mans” everywhere else, these were effectively 924S Club Sports:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 924S Le Mans on eBay

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition – No Reserve

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition – No Reserve

A few months ago was the last time we featured a nice Porsche 924S. That particular 1988 Porsche 924 Special Edition was the same model that I’m writing up today, but unlike that car this particular model has the original staggered phone dials and shows off that neat model-specific interior a little more. The 924S remains a solid value with clean looks, great performance and low ownership costs. Today’s example looks quite stealthy dressed in black, and kitted out with most of Porsche’s “go faster” bag of tricks from the 1980s these last of the run were the fastest normally aspirated 924s produced:

Year: 1988
Model: 924S Special Edition
Engine: 2.5 liter inline-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 99,400 mi
Price: Reserve Auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1988 Porsche 924S SE on eBay

Selling our 1998 Porsche 924SE
This was the last year Porsche made the 924 & this is a true “real” special edition “SE” model

In 1988, the 924S’ final year of production, power increased to 160 bhp (119 kW; 162 PS) matching that of the previous year’s Le Mans spec cars and the base model 944 (itself detuned by 3 bhp (2 kW; 3 PS) for 1988). This was achieved using different pistons which raised the S’ compression ratio from 9.7:1 to 10.2:1, the knock-on effect being an increase in the octane rating, up from 91 RON to 95. This made the 924S slightly faster than the base 944 due to its lighter weight and more aerodynamic body.

(Copied from wikipedia under “special models” -) US market SE:
Black only paint scheme with optional SE Edition decal. Equipped with manual steering, manual windows and door locks, sunroof delete, radio delete, AC delete, cruise delete, passenger side door mirror delete, wider 15×7 phone dial alloys for the rear while retaining 15×6 in front, and the M030 package which included stiffer springs and Koni shocks.

1991 Volkswagen Cabriolet Etienne Aigner Edition

1991 Volkswagen Cabriolet Etienne Aigner Edition

Special edition models are nothing new to the automotive world. Many times a manufacturer will release such a model due to lagging sales, to commemorate an anniversary or to signify the end of a model run. By the time the early 1990s rolled around, the Volkswagen Cabriolet was getting a bit long in the tooth, still being based off the MkI Golf introduced back in 1973. A new Cabriolet would appear with the introduction of the MkIII Golf in 1993, but before the MkI Cabriolet rode into the sunset, Volkswagen introduced the Etienne Aigner Edition Cabriolet. This was merely an appearance package for the Cabriolet, consisting of special interior fabric and leather trim, pinstripe and logos on the outside and the rather attractive La Castellet alloy wheels. The majority of these Etienne Aigner edition Cabriolets I’ve seen have been burgundy, making this Mangrove Green version for sale in Arizona a rather interesting find.

Year: 1991
Model: Cabriolet Etienne Aigner Edition
Engine: 1.8 liter inline-4
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 91,700 mi
Price: No reserve auction

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1991 Volkswagen Cabriolet Etienne Aigner Edition on eBay

Please read entire description and research shipping costs before bidding. Car is located in Tucson, AZ and is available to see and drive. Over 100 pics available here. Bids will not be accepted from bidders with less than 10 positive feedbacks without contacting me first. Bids from buyers with unpaid items will not be accepted. Final payment for full auction value due within 5 days of auction close via direct bank transfer, cashier’s check or cash in person. I will accept paypal but buyer to add 2.9% to cover paypal fees. Once payment has cleared I will send the notarized title to the buyer via USPS priority with delivery confirmation and car will not be driven.

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition

There were two main complaints about the 1987 Porsche 924S I wrote up last week – it was too expensive, and it was an automatic. In response to both points, I’d like to revisit a car we featured back in May that remains for sale on eBay. With a more reasonable entry price, the desired 5-speed, and more stylish although not original Design 90 wheels, this 1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition ticks the right boxes if you prefer to fly low on the Porsche ownership radar. This car also epitomizes how the 924S is misunderstood and unappreciated – were they to change the name from “Special Edition” to “Club Sport” (which it effectively is) I really think it would be priced higher and snapped up more quickly. As a friend once told me, it’s not really a special edition unless someone knows why it’s special! As it sits, though, it remains a performance bargain that will provide lots of driving enjoyment for not much investment, especially with the opening bid now below $6,000.

– Carter

1988 Porsche 924S Special Edition – REVISIT

The below post originally appeared on our site May 8, 2013:

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One of the great things about writing for German Cars for Sale is learning about the myriad esoteric special editions produced by our beloved German manufacturers. From the relatively-mundane (Audi Allroad US Ski Team edition, anyone?) to the extreme (How about the E30 M3 Cecotto?), they are the funny bits that keep us car nerds hunting for more. Today we have a special edition of one of the most unloved Porsches ever produced. The 924 came in to provide a basement for the company line as the 914 and 912 were phased out. Using the front-engine platform that led to the 944, the 924 earned its derision by offering just 95hp at the outset.…