Feature Listing: 2015 Audi S4

Just the other day, an old car friend of mine contacted our group of enthusiasts with an interesting challenge. He currently owns a Nissan 370Z, and while he really likes the car he’s got a family and needs something a bit more practical. So he queried the group; what car should he get in the $40,000 range that was special, fast, had 4-doors and a manual transmission?

Several thoughts came to mind, and I’m sure that everyone’s head is already spinning like mine did. While immediately several went to BMW M products like the E39 M5, I had an alternate suggestion which also considered where my friend lives – New Hampshire. ‘What about the Audi S4?’ I suggested. He admitted had hadn’t thought of one, in part because he previously owned a S4 – in his case a B5 – and didn’t love the driving experience.

Well, since the S4 has come a long way since the 1990s in power, technology, size and driving experience. And what has emerged is a very impressive all-arounder which flies under the radar. The supercharged V6 in the B8 gave a healthy 333 horsepower an Russian steppe-flat torque curve with 325 lb.ft available from 3,000 rpms straight through 5,250. This power could be channeled through two increasing rare options to find in electronics-heavy cars – a manual gearbox and a sport differential. Okay, 333 horsepower doesn’t sound outlandish in today’s world. But as with fast Audis of the past, the B8 and 8.5 made efficient use of that power and putting it down on the ground, making them capable of 4.4 second 0-60 sprints and a 13 second quarter-mile. This is a car which punches above its weight class, capable of embarrassing unsuspecting muscle cars.

Yet it retains its luxury-oriented character and go-anywhere all-wheel drive options, along with the practicality of offering 4-doors. And like ‘Q-Ships’ from the past, outside of a few extra exhaust ports and slightly flashier badging, most people would be hard-pressed to differentiate this serious performance package from the normal A4 wrapper. But that doesn’t mean that this car has to be boring, and you could select a few beautiful exterior colors such as this Volcano Red Metallic example:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2015 Audi S4 on Audizine

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Feature Listing: 1989 Volkswagen GTI 16V

I was pretty excited to see the 1986 Volkswagen GTI that popped up for sale last week. While the A2 is a seriously popular platform for enthusiasts and tuners, coming across original examples is exceedingly hard. But within the GTI range from 1985-1992, the ’85-’86 probably rank lowest on desirability.

You can imagine what a treat it was for me, then, to get to follow it up with the car that re-injected excitement into the lineup. For 1987, Volkswagen brought its development of the EA827 inline-4 – the PL – to the Golf. Already in the Scirocco, it boasted 16 valves, 10:1 compression, KE-Jetronic injection and 123 horsepower. That was over a 20% jump in power, and mated to a close-ratio 5-speed manual it more than made up for the additional heft of the A2 compared to the A1.

To help differentiate its new engine, and because it was initially run alongside the 8V model, several styling cues were added to the 16V. Shared with the Scirocco, the easiest to spot were the “Silverstone” (Teardrop) alloys that would be the signature of the 16Vs for the next few years. Less noticeable were minor changes; painted lower valances and a deeper front lip spoiler, a relocated Fuba antenna now residing on the roof, and – of course – 16V badges and red stripes throughout. The 16V also got a special leatherette interior and beefy 205-55-VR14 Pirelli P600 tires.

Measured 0-60 times plummeted; now capable of achieving the feat in 7.9 seconds, Volkswagen also installed a pretty optimistic 140 mph speedometer. But it was an indication that this was a quick car, and indeed the GTI again punched above its weight class in performance. The base price was up, too – now $12,250, but you could opt in air conditioning, metallic paint, a sunroof and nicer Heidelberg radio and be pushing $14,000 pretty easily.

Despite the price increase, the GTI was an immediate success, universally heralded by magazines as the best GTI yet. With most of the A2 16Vs now approaching 30 years old, though, they’ve become reclusive legends and rarely appear like this:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Volkswagen GTI 16V on eBay

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Feature Listing: 1995 BMW M3 Dinan S3-spec

It’s interesting to consider how enthusiasts today view the E36 M3. Generally speaking, you’re either a completely devoted fan who insists that the E36 is not only the best M3, but perhaps the best BMW ever made. Why stop there? Why not go straight for best car in the history of the world, ever? On the other side of the coin, detractors love to point out that the second M3 was softened up for the U.S. market, that it wasn’t as potent, as pure, as Motorsporty as the original curb-hopping, box-flared legend.

Arguably, they’re both right. It’s certainly true that BMW made the decision to tone down the M3 for North American consumption. That was a really good thing for two reasons: one, that we got it at all, and two, that it remained affordable. Consider, for a moment, that the E30 M3 had grown quite expensive to sport all of that motorsport heritage. By 1991, the base price of the M3 was $35,900. Of course, it was competing against even more expensive cars like the Porsche 944S2, which was a further $10,000 more dear. While we can talk about driving spirit all day long, if we look at the fact sheets what you got was a bit soggy in comparison to today’s cars. Inflation corrected, the M3 would be around $62,000 – pretty much spot on the entry price for today’s M3. The new car has more than double the horsepower of the original and enough tech to launch all of the Apollo program missions.

So what was really exciting when the new M3 was launched in late 1994 was that price point; $36,000. That was some $14,000 less expensive than the European model, and yet performance was within a few clicks thanks to a revised version of the 325i M50 engine. In fact, many – including notoriously BMW-savvy Car and Driver – suggested that the U.S. spec M3 was a better choice than the more exotic Euro model for our roads.

Today, the E36 M3 remains for many the smart choice within the lineup. Long overlooked as the obvious choice, prices have remained low relative to its predecessor and even its replacement. Modern comparisons often skip the E36 entirely. But that doesn’t mean you can’t get exotic performance and looks from the middle child:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1995 BMW M3 on eBay

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Feature Listing: Venetian Blue 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet M491

Turbo-look Carreras are becoming a regular occurrence around here. That’s good! These are some of our favorite of the classic 911s for their combination of 930 appearance, suspension, and braking, but in a little more refined and less high strung a package. They’re also pretty rare. We like rare.

We especially like rare 911s when they are looking their best and have spent a decent bit of time being driven by the owners who derive so much joy from them. Here all of these facets come together in this Venetian Blue Metallic 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet with Champagne interior. As I’ve noted with previous M491 Carrera posts, the later ’87-’89 model years represent a special subset of these cars given that they came with the G50 5-speed transmission and that there are fewer of them since the 930 was now back and available for the US market. For some wide-body top-down cruising, this 911 should provide just the thing you’re seeking.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: Venetian Blue 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Cabriolet M491 on Rennlist

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Feature Listing: 2011 BMW 335d M-Sport

Since the 1990s, the proliferation of each premium marque’s “special” brands has become dizzying, and for enthusiasts it seems as though they’ve continuously diluted the performance options in favor of profits. From S-Line to AMG to perhaps the biggest offender, BMW’s M division, companies are badge slapping-happy when it comes to sticking a bigger set of wheels, some special trim and maybe, if you’re lucky, a few extra ponies. And on the surface, this 335d would seem to fit that description perfectly. After all, how could you possibly compare the diesel to that sonorous M3’s S65 V8 that cranks out over 400 horsepower and 300 lb.ft of torque with a 8,400 RPM redline? Pull up to a redlight next to one in this 335d, and the snickering owner would undoubtedly be laughing at the ‘M-Sport’ option package you ticked off. Because you’d think there would be absolutely no way that diesel would produce equal power to the M3.

You’d be right. The M57 under the hood of the 335D doesn’t produce as much horsepower as the M3, at least not in stock form. But torque? It produces more. A lot more.

Starting at a leisurely 2,000 rpms, the twin turbochargers augmenting the inline-6 spool up to a mountain of power. In stock form, the 335d cranked out 428 lb.ft of torque. In fact, it’s so much torque that gets used on a regular basis that the first person I met who had one had already consumed a transfer case on his X-Drive model, and he’s not alone. Being a turbocharged model, it was also quite easy and possible to turn up the wick, such as has been done to today’s Feature Listing. The result? The seller claims 410 horsepower, 650 lb.ft of torque, and yet this classy 4-door can still return 35 mpg. Try that in a M3:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2011 BMW 335d M-Sport on eBay

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Feature Listing: 1998 BMW 328iC

By 1995, the BMW 325i had long established itself as the benchmark by which all other sedans were judged. Though it had only appeared in the United States for the 1992 model year, Europeans had access to the E36 as early as 1990. That meant they by 1995, the model was in need of a refresh and BMW was happy to oblige. But as the U.S. market was occupied by the M3 launch, the new non-M range-topper’s appearance would have to wait until 1996.

When the 328i did arrive, it was very much a case of ‘meet the new boss’; while not a fresh design, the light updates were met with more power to continue the 3-series’ reign at the top of the sales charts. The revised M52B28 was installed, and though it was more evolution than revolution, it was pretty good at spinning the needle thanks to 15% more torque than the M50 (207 v. 181). That meant real-world power and acceleration were at your hands, and matched with a manual gearbox the new 328i’s 0-60 time dropped into the low 7-second range. The changes carried over to the popular convertible range, which offered considerably more 4-seat sport than either the Audi Cabriolet or the E320 Convertible. At over $41,000 out the door, perhaps it should have, but then that price guaranteed that the drop-top 3-series would be prized by those lucky enough to order them.

Today, finding an E36 for sale isn’t very hard. But with the newest nearly 20 years old, finding a good one can be. These days, fewer and fewer appear like this very low mileage, well equipped 328iC:

CLICK TO EMAIL SELLER: 1998 BMW 328iC

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Feature Listing: 1967 NSU TT

As Konrad Adenauer slowly rebuilt West German in the post-War era, the resulting Wirtschaftswunder finally realized the economic prosperity necessary for personal automobile ownership; something that Germany had lagged far behind its rivals in until well after the War. Though they had developed the first motorized carriages and had a reputation as a nation of drivers thanks to some clever Nazi propaganda and the development of the revolutionary highway system, the reality was that in the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s Germany was a nation of riders – motorcycles, that is.

It comes as no surprise, then, that the fledgling car companies which were the most successful at first were able to incorporate motorcycle technology into their automobiles. This kept development and production costs down, and in turn meant that the company could bring a small, economical car to market much more inexpensively than a traditional manufacturer. This worked perfectly for BMW, whose Isetta and later 700 models paved the way for the modern car company you know today. But BMW was not the only motorcycle-engine toting company, and though the name isn’t as well-known today, it was NSU Motorenwerke that was the world’s premier motorcycle producer in the 1950s. So, in the late 1950s, NSU put those great engines to work in the back of their new economy car – the Prinz.

The Prinz would go on over the next decade to develop several times. The Prinz I-III models featured continuous upgrades, better driveability, and more power from the twin. But in 1961 the Prinz 4 model took NSU to a much larger market. It featured modern 3-box sedan styling, though it retained the twin drivetrain from the earlier models. The Prinz 1000 model rectified the motivation issues, introducing a new air-cooled 1000cc inline-4. This package was then further developed into a sporting model; the TT. Named after the famous ‘Tourist Trophy’ races of the 1960s, a bigger motor with more power was met with larger wheels and tires and revised styling. Like the BMW 700, these NSU TTs and the subsequent TTS model formed the basis of their respective companies post-War racing efforts, and are still fan-favorites in vintage racing today. But in the U.S., though all NSU models are rare, the TT and TTS are especially so. That’s what makes it such a treat to see an example like this one for sale today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1967 NSU TT on San Diego Craigslist

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Feature Listing: 1995.5 Audi S6 Avant

It’s often difficult for a second act to follow a legend, and that’s just what the C4 S4 had to do when it launched for U.S. customers in 1992. The Type 44 was already a fan favorite before the 20V version appeared here briefly for the 1991 model year, with wider flared track, bigger brakes, and more power. To answer fans, Audi introduced an even more potent version with the S4; even bigger wheels, lower suspension, and a few more horses were encased in a thoroughly modern shape, yet one that was easily recognizable to fans of the brand. With a reputation for smooth power delivery and still the market cornered on all-wheel drive performance luxury vehicles, Audi’s new S4 sold out almost immediately in a period when the European makes had difficulty moving their expensive wares.

But the Type 44 still held one advantage over its replacement; an optional fifth door. While the Avant version of the new 100 was available immediately, there was no range-topping S4 wagon brought here. That was finally remedied with the relaunch of the now renamed S6 Avant for 1995. With smoothed out bumpers, revised passenger mirror, rolling changes such as new Speedline Avus 6-spoke wheels replaced the Fuchs that the S4 wore, and headrests became closed. There were more changes with the ‘95.5’ model; the infrared remote locking became radio frequency and the B-pillar receiver disappeared; so, too, did the option to lock the rear differential yourself, as Audi opted to work in an electronic differential lock utilizing the ABS speed sensors rather than a physically locking rear end.

These were really only minor changes to the recipe, which at its roots remained a fan fantasy. The traditional inline-5 that had hung out of the nose of the high-end Audis was still there, with its dual-cam head augmented by electronic fuel injection and electronic boost control. The turbo spun up quickly and had an overboost function, giving drivers 227 horsepower and 258 lb.ft of torque to be mastered solely by a manual transmission with Torsen center differential. Form-fitting electric sport seats kept front passengers firmly planted in place through the prodigious grip generated by the meaty 225 section tires. Combined with the prodigious space the Avant offered families and the ability of these cars to eat up highway miles with aplomb regardless of weather, not to mention the incredible tuning potential of the AAN 20V turbo, they’ve become highly sought steeds with a very limited pool of around 300 originally imported:

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Feature Listing: 1989 Porsche 930 Cabriolet

At the end of my post yesterday of a Carrera Targa Supersport I mentioned that the asking price was such that you could pretty easily find yourself an actual Porsche 930 in very nice condition for less money. Lo and behold we just so happened to receive this 930 for a feature and I think it does a pretty good job of demonstrating what I discussed with the Targa Supersport. I fully admit it’s an apples to oranges comparison (different market, different model, different mileage, etc.), it just struck me as nice and timely.

Anyway, let’s get to it:

Here we have a Grand Prix White 1989 Porsche 930 Cabriolet with 64,500 miles on it. An ’89 930 always gets our attention. As the only year the 930 came equipped with a 5-speed manual transmission these are incredibly desirable and when one is in good condition it’s always worth further investigation. This one even has a very subtle and unique attribute: Porsche script cloth seat inserts. The first I’ve seen!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Cabriolet at Auto Kennel

Year: 1989
Model: 911 Turbo Cabriolet
Engine: 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 64,500 mi
Price: $124,990

1989 Porsche 930 911 Turbo Cabriolet
G50/50 5-Speed Gearbox/Limited Slip Diff.

1 of 600 Built for North America

Past PCA President Owner

1-Owner for 23-Years
Stock #0827

VIN: WP0EB0938KS070124

ENG# 68K00178 (930/68)

Numbers Matching

64,500 Original Miles

Grand Prix White on Blue Leather & Porsche Cloth with Dark Blue Top
5-speed G50/50 Manual Transmission
Clean and Clear Arizona Title
No Accidents/Mostly Original Paint
2-Southwest Owners from New
Past PCA President Owned
Clean AutoCheck Background Report
Porsche Certificate of Authenticity (COA)
Offered at $124,990
More and more enthusiasts are beginning to see not only what wonderful cars the 930s are to drive, but also how important they are to the history of the 911. These Turbos were built between 1975 and 1989. The last year was a shorter production as Porsche was already introducing the new 964 body. As a result, only a handful of last-year 930s were built for North America. Only 600 cabriolets were actually delivered to the U.S out of 824 built in total for the globe. Plus, it was the only year 930 to get the all-new G50/50 5-speed gearbox. These two factors are making the 1989 Porsche Turbos among the most desirable.

This Porsche was built in August of 1988 and sold new by Beverly Hills Porsche on May 26th, 1989. Although these last year 930s were well equipped as standard, the following additional options were ordered:

Custom cloth seat inserts with “Porsche” embroidered
Blaupunkt Reno Radio
Amplifier
Limited Slip Differential (40%)
The total MSRP was nearly $73,000 (approximately $146,000 in today’s dollars).

The first owner serviced the car regularly at the local Porsche dealer until selling it to the current owner in 1994 with around 28k-miles. The current owner has been a long time active PCA member and served on our local OCR (Orange Coast Region) board for over 10-years including the role as President. In the late 90’s, he ended up moving to Arizona and the car has been carefully garaged there ever since. Most of the miles are from PCA events including national Parades. Over the years, this owner has serviced the car regularly and it has never needed any major work. Highlights of services over the years include:

Rebuild A/C system including new lines and compressor
Restore factory wheels with polished lips (by Al Reed)
New soft-top (by the Porsche dealer)
Replaced ignition control unit
Furthermore, we just had our local specialist go through the whole car, inspect it, and perform the following services:

Rebuild warm up regulator
Rebuild fuel distributor
Rebuild fuel pressure regulator
Remove and clean fuel tank and system
Replace hood and decklid shocks
Service A/C system (charge/check for leaks)
New factory horn
Check/fix all interior and exterior lights
General inspection
New correct OEM size Bridgestone tires
Adjust/service power top
New spark plugs
New injectors
Rebuild slide valve
Finally, a leakdown test was performed and the results were excellent (percentages off of 100%):

1) 4% 2) 4% 3) 3% 4) 6% 5) 3% 6) 4%

Our local specialist found this 930 to be in very nice, dry, and original condition. The bottom was dry with no oil leaking from the normal spots. The turbo system was also dry. Furthermore, there were no signs of abuse or damage.

This 930 is in excellent condition and typical for a low-mile, 2-owner, Southwest Porsche. The paint appears to be mostly original and verified with a paint meter. There is (undetectable to the naked eye) some blending on the front right fender, which shows on the paint meter. However, the car has been inspected and there are no signs of accidents or other repairs. The doors, hood, and deck lid are all wearing their original VIN decals as well as the original option decal under the hood (see pics). There are minimal signs of use as the owner used a car bra when traveling (included). There are two faint door dings in the right rear fender (see pics) and are barely detectible. All the glass is original (including the windshield) and in great shape. All the light lenses are nice with no cracks. The original factory Fuchs have been refinished/polished and are wearing new Bridgestone tires. The brakes have just under half-life remaining. All of the exterior lights function properly.

The interior is equally as nice. The original leather/cloth seats are in excellent condition with minimal signs of wear. The rare Porsche text fabric is in great shape with no rips. There is one small tear on one of the rear seat backs (see pic). The dash is perfect and has no cracks or warping. The door panels and carpet look fresh with no stains or warping either. The soft top was recently replaced by the Porsche dealer and looks near new with a clear rear window, perfect headliner, and no tears or rips. It is a full automatic power top and functions properly. All the gauges function properly. There was an older aftermarket radio system in the car that didn’t work, so we had it professionally removed and a factory delete plate installed. The original Blaupunkt radio broke over 20-years ago and is not available. The A/C system has recently been serviced and blows ice cold. All the rest of the buttons and switches work properly.

This 930 cab drives fantastic. The mechanic and I have done extended drives in it and found it to be operating perfectly. It starts easily and holds an even idle. The boost comes on strong with excellent pull. The boost gauge reads .2 bar off, but the system was tested with a manual gauge and it is putting out the factory .8 bar. The brakes feel fantastic with great initial bite and no fading. The 5-speed shifts smoothly with no grinding or clutch slip. The shift bushings will need to be replaced soon though. The parking brake also needs adjustment. This 930 cab would be welcome on any PCA concours lawn as well as being at home on long distant vintage touring events.

This Turbo comes with its original owner’s manuals, space saver spare tire, jack, Certificate of Authenticity, car bra, tonneau cover, and recent service receipts.

When I first saw these seats I thought something was wrong. They looked faded. Then I realized they were cloth. Then I thought the cloth had stripes or lines in it (but not intentionally). Nope, that’s Porsche script. Of course, all of this is made clear in the ad text, but I tend to start with the photos. The point of all of that is that I’ve never seen this seat design before. Porsche is known for making available a wide array of options. Add this one to the list. These seats certainly are rare. How much any individual person might care about that rarity I’m sure will vary, but we must factor it in to any analysis. Of equal importance, those seats look in great shape! Even though 65K miles isn’t a lot for a car of this age it is enough for wear to begin to show if the seats aren’t shown good care. As for flaws: there is a small tear in the seat back of one of the rear seats. The original radio also is missing and currently replaced by a delete panel. That’s too bad, but otherwise the rest looks good. With the exterior we find a similar situation. Everything looks clean and correct and well cared for. The subtle contrast of the dark blue top works well with the Grand Prix White paint.

Overall this 930 presents nicely. It isn’t one of those 930s we see spec’d with a ton of options, but the cloth Porsche script seats do make for a bit of a conversation starter. It’s a two-owner car with current ownership extending back to 1994 by a former PCA president. Added to that, it sounds like it comes with a good bit of documentation. That’s the sort of stuff we like to hear and it fits the condition in which we find the car. With an asking price near $125K this 930 certainly is not inexpensive, but when we combine the condition with the rare seats and the one-year-only 5-speed transmission you can start to see how the price makes some sense.

For those who might have an interest in something with a bit more of a vintage feel to it, Auto Kennel also has a very pretty Signal Red 1964 Porsche 356SC Coupe for sale. Check it out!

-Rob

Feature Listing: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe Backdate

Among Porsche 911 enthusiasts and collectors the 1973 911 Carrera RS is a much adored car and for very good reason. While not the very first performance oriented model of the 911 Porsche produced, previous versions like the 911R were produced in such small numbers that most buyers never would have had any shot at them. While the Carrera RS was still produced in relatively small numbers, production still reached around 1,500 so there were a few to go around and they caused quite a stir.

Naturally, all of this greatness means prices are now very, very, high. Some Lightweights have eclipsed $1M. Because of those high prices and the general demand for the style and performance it has become increasingly common for builders to backdate later 911s, usually the 3.2 Carrera or (more rarely) the 964, bringing the style of the long-hood Carrera RS to the more modern mechanicals and underlying structure of a later 911. We’ve featured quite a few of these builds and they come in all sorts of spec and with a wide range of prices. Here we have another, which I think looks fantastic in its very understated, but still quite pretty, Dolphin Grey exterior and within the typical range in which we see these priced, this one seems pretty reasonable!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe Backdate at Kachel Motor Co.

Year: 1987
Model: 911 Carrera
Engine: 3.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 134,600+ mi
Price: $58,995

KMC is proud to present a unique opportunity to own this bespoke, award-winning, Restomod air-cooled 911. The build was based on a clean, numbers-matching 1987 911 Carrera from California. This was a perfect base for the build, given the well-established reliability of the 3.2L engine, with a slicker-shifting Getrag G50 gear box and revised chain tensioning and lubrication system (which plagued the previous 911 generations). The car has been restored in the style of the venerable 1973 911 RS, with steel long-hood and fenders, and a fiberglass rear-lid with ducktail. All of the chrome trim, door handles and window latches have been re-anodized, which balance out the beautiful, Glasurit Dolphin Grey (an original 356 color) paint. The 17″ pristine replica Fuchs complete the clean and classic look of the car.

The interior has styling cues from the famed Singer 911, including period-correct gauges with a Heuer-logo clock, powder-coated floor-boards and classic-styled, hounds-tooth sport bucket seats. Subtle details like the authentic (and hard to find) Heuer Rally dash timers, Alcantara headliner, dash and door trim, wood 917-style shift knob and made to order Autoflug-style 5-point harness truly make the interior a special and inviting place.

Mechanically, the car is well sorted out with a valve adjustment and clutch service at 134,600 miles. The struts, sway bars and wheel bearings have also been serviced recently, and the car has just been fitted with a brand new set of tires. Tasteful performance upgrades include a Wevo short-shift kit, Steve Wong chip, SSI heat exchangers and Dansk sport mufflers. This car has no cold-start issues, pulls hard and has no oil leaks.

Make no mistake, this is a driver’s car that is as amazing to drive, as it is to behold in your garage or at a car show. If you have ever drooled over Rob Dickinson’s, Lightspeed or Autofarm 911 Restomods, here is your chance to own a one-of-a-kind classic, yet affordable, re-imagined 911.

This particular build began with an ’87 Carrera Coupe, so you’re getting the stout 3.2 liter flat-6 paired with the G50 5-speed transmission. It makes for a nice base and in most cases leads to higher prices though that isn’t much reflected here. The engine sounds like it’s mostly in stock form. There area a few upgrades, but I would expect power levels to be fairly typical for this period Carrera. The exterior is what we expect from such a build: long-hood, ducktail, wider rear, all paired with a nice looking set of Fuchs replicas. The interior looks nicely outfitted as well and in an understated way. They haven’t gone over the top with the details, but things like houndstooth seating and a set of Heuer rally timers are nice additions that provide a sporty feel to the car. Like the RS itself there’s little in the way of extra components to the interior; we have the things we need for piloting the car and little else. In that regard it’s excellent.

And at the end, with an asking price a little below $60K they aren’t asking for something too unreasonable either. Someone interested in replicating such a build will be hardpressed to do so for cheaper without already possessing a well-sorted 3.2 Carrera to use as your base. If you had to buy a car as well it might not be possible. Some may prefer a brighter color (heck, I might prefer a brighter color!), but this isn’t the first 911 I’ve seen painted in one of the lighter shades from the 356 and they tend to look really nice. This one is no different. I wouldn’t say it’s a sleeper, but you can certainly cruise a little freer.

-Rob