Feature Listing: 1995.5 Audi S6 Avant

It’s often difficult for a second act to follow a legend, and that’s just what the C4 S4 had to do when it launched for U.S. customers in 1992. The Type 44 was already a fan favorite before the 20V version appeared here briefly for the 1991 model year, with wider flared track, bigger brakes, and more power. To answer fans, Audi introduced an even more potent version with the S4; even bigger wheels, lower suspension, and a few more horses were encased in a thoroughly modern shape, yet one that was easily recognizable to fans of the brand. With a reputation for smooth power delivery and still the market cornered on all-wheel drive performance luxury vehicles, Audi’s new S4 sold out almost immediately in a period when the European makes had difficulty moving their expensive wares.

But the Type 44 still held one advantage over its replacement; an optional fifth door. While the Avant version of the new 100 was available immediately, there was no range-topping S4 wagon brought here. That was finally remedied with the relaunch of the now renamed S6 Avant for 1995. With smoothed out bumpers, revised passenger mirror, rolling changes such as new Speedline Avus 6-spoke wheels replaced the Fuchs that the S4 wore, and headrests became closed. There were more changes with the ‘95.5’ model; the infrared remote locking became radio frequency and the B-pillar receiver disappeared; so, too, did the option to lock the rear differential yourself, as Audi opted to work in an electronic differential lock utilizing the ABS speed sensors rather than a physically locking rear end.

These were really only minor changes to the recipe, which at its roots remained a fan fantasy. The traditional inline-5 that had hung out of the nose of the high-end Audis was still there, with its dual-cam head augmented by electronic fuel injection and electronic boost control. The turbo spun up quickly and had an overboost function, giving drivers 227 horsepower and 258 lb.ft of torque to be mastered solely by a manual transmission with Torsen center differential. Form-fitting electric sport seats kept front passengers firmly planted in place through the prodigious grip generated by the meaty 225 section tires. Combined with the prodigious space the Avant offered families and the ability of these cars to eat up highway miles with aplomb regardless of weather, not to mention the incredible tuning potential of the AAN 20V turbo, they’ve become highly sought steeds with a very limited pool of around 300 originally imported:

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Feature Listing: 1989 Porsche 930 Cabriolet

At the end of my post yesterday of a Carrera Targa Supersport I mentioned that the asking price was such that you could pretty easily find yourself an actual Porsche 930 in very nice condition for less money. Lo and behold we just so happened to receive this 930 for a feature and I think it does a pretty good job of demonstrating what I discussed with the Targa Supersport. I fully admit it’s an apples to oranges comparison (different market, different model, different mileage, etc.), it just struck me as nice and timely.

Anyway, let’s get to it:

Here we have a Grand Prix White 1989 Porsche 930 Cabriolet with 64,500 miles on it. An ’89 930 always gets our attention. As the only year the 930 came equipped with a 5-speed manual transmission these are incredibly desirable and when one is in good condition it’s always worth further investigation. This one even has a very subtle and unique attribute: Porsche script cloth seat inserts. The first I’ve seen!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1989 Porsche 930 Cabriolet at Auto Kennel

Year: 1989
Model: 911 Turbo Cabriolet
Engine: 3.3 liter turbocharged flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 64,500 mi
Price: $124,990

1989 Porsche 930 911 Turbo Cabriolet
G50/50 5-Speed Gearbox/Limited Slip Diff.

1 of 600 Built for North America

Past PCA President Owner

1-Owner for 23-Years
Stock #0827

VIN: WP0EB0938KS070124

ENG# 68K00178 (930/68)

Numbers Matching

64,500 Original Miles

Grand Prix White on Blue Leather & Porsche Cloth with Dark Blue Top
5-speed G50/50 Manual Transmission
Clean and Clear Arizona Title
No Accidents/Mostly Original Paint
2-Southwest Owners from New
Past PCA President Owned
Clean AutoCheck Background Report
Porsche Certificate of Authenticity (COA)
Offered at $124,990
More and more enthusiasts are beginning to see not only what wonderful cars the 930s are to drive, but also how important they are to the history of the 911. These Turbos were built between 1975 and 1989. The last year was a shorter production as Porsche was already introducing the new 964 body. As a result, only a handful of last-year 930s were built for North America. Only 600 cabriolets were actually delivered to the U.S out of 824 built in total for the globe. Plus, it was the only year 930 to get the all-new G50/50 5-speed gearbox. These two factors are making the 1989 Porsche Turbos among the most desirable.

This Porsche was built in August of 1988 and sold new by Beverly Hills Porsche on May 26th, 1989. Although these last year 930s were well equipped as standard, the following additional options were ordered:

Custom cloth seat inserts with “Porsche” embroidered
Blaupunkt Reno Radio
Amplifier
Limited Slip Differential (40%)
The total MSRP was nearly $73,000 (approximately $146,000 in today’s dollars).

The first owner serviced the car regularly at the local Porsche dealer until selling it to the current owner in 1994 with around 28k-miles. The current owner has been a long time active PCA member and served on our local OCR (Orange Coast Region) board for over 10-years including the role as President. In the late 90’s, he ended up moving to Arizona and the car has been carefully garaged there ever since. Most of the miles are from PCA events including national Parades. Over the years, this owner has serviced the car regularly and it has never needed any major work. Highlights of services over the years include:

Rebuild A/C system including new lines and compressor
Restore factory wheels with polished lips (by Al Reed)
New soft-top (by the Porsche dealer)
Replaced ignition control unit
Furthermore, we just had our local specialist go through the whole car, inspect it, and perform the following services:

Rebuild warm up regulator
Rebuild fuel distributor
Rebuild fuel pressure regulator
Remove and clean fuel tank and system
Replace hood and decklid shocks
Service A/C system (charge/check for leaks)
New factory horn
Check/fix all interior and exterior lights
General inspection
New correct OEM size Bridgestone tires
Adjust/service power top
New spark plugs
New injectors
Rebuild slide valve
Finally, a leakdown test was performed and the results were excellent (percentages off of 100%):

1) 4% 2) 4% 3) 3% 4) 6% 5) 3% 6) 4%

Our local specialist found this 930 to be in very nice, dry, and original condition. The bottom was dry with no oil leaking from the normal spots. The turbo system was also dry. Furthermore, there were no signs of abuse or damage.

This 930 is in excellent condition and typical for a low-mile, 2-owner, Southwest Porsche. The paint appears to be mostly original and verified with a paint meter. There is (undetectable to the naked eye) some blending on the front right fender, which shows on the paint meter. However, the car has been inspected and there are no signs of accidents or other repairs. The doors, hood, and deck lid are all wearing their original VIN decals as well as the original option decal under the hood (see pics). There are minimal signs of use as the owner used a car bra when traveling (included). There are two faint door dings in the right rear fender (see pics) and are barely detectible. All the glass is original (including the windshield) and in great shape. All the light lenses are nice with no cracks. The original factory Fuchs have been refinished/polished and are wearing new Bridgestone tires. The brakes have just under half-life remaining. All of the exterior lights function properly.

The interior is equally as nice. The original leather/cloth seats are in excellent condition with minimal signs of wear. The rare Porsche text fabric is in great shape with no rips. There is one small tear on one of the rear seat backs (see pic). The dash is perfect and has no cracks or warping. The door panels and carpet look fresh with no stains or warping either. The soft top was recently replaced by the Porsche dealer and looks near new with a clear rear window, perfect headliner, and no tears or rips. It is a full automatic power top and functions properly. All the gauges function properly. There was an older aftermarket radio system in the car that didn’t work, so we had it professionally removed and a factory delete plate installed. The original Blaupunkt radio broke over 20-years ago and is not available. The A/C system has recently been serviced and blows ice cold. All the rest of the buttons and switches work properly.

This 930 cab drives fantastic. The mechanic and I have done extended drives in it and found it to be operating perfectly. It starts easily and holds an even idle. The boost comes on strong with excellent pull. The boost gauge reads .2 bar off, but the system was tested with a manual gauge and it is putting out the factory .8 bar. The brakes feel fantastic with great initial bite and no fading. The 5-speed shifts smoothly with no grinding or clutch slip. The shift bushings will need to be replaced soon though. The parking brake also needs adjustment. This 930 cab would be welcome on any PCA concours lawn as well as being at home on long distant vintage touring events.

This Turbo comes with its original owner’s manuals, space saver spare tire, jack, Certificate of Authenticity, car bra, tonneau cover, and recent service receipts.

When I first saw these seats I thought something was wrong. They looked faded. Then I realized they were cloth. Then I thought the cloth had stripes or lines in it (but not intentionally). Nope, that’s Porsche script. Of course, all of this is made clear in the ad text, but I tend to start with the photos. The point of all of that is that I’ve never seen this seat design before. Porsche is known for making available a wide array of options. Add this one to the list. These seats certainly are rare. How much any individual person might care about that rarity I’m sure will vary, but we must factor it in to any analysis. Of equal importance, those seats look in great shape! Even though 65K miles isn’t a lot for a car of this age it is enough for wear to begin to show if the seats aren’t shown good care. As for flaws: there is a small tear in the seat back of one of the rear seats. The original radio also is missing and currently replaced by a delete panel. That’s too bad, but otherwise the rest looks good. With the exterior we find a similar situation. Everything looks clean and correct and well cared for. The subtle contrast of the dark blue top works well with the Grand Prix White paint.

Overall this 930 presents nicely. It isn’t one of those 930s we see spec’d with a ton of options, but the cloth Porsche script seats do make for a bit of a conversation starter. It’s a two-owner car with current ownership extending back to 1994 by a former PCA president. Added to that, it sounds like it comes with a good bit of documentation. That’s the sort of stuff we like to hear and it fits the condition in which we find the car. With an asking price near $125K this 930 certainly is not inexpensive, but when we combine the condition with the rare seats and the one-year-only 5-speed transmission you can start to see how the price makes some sense.

For those who might have an interest in something with a bit more of a vintage feel to it, Auto Kennel also has a very pretty Signal Red 1964 Porsche 356SC Coupe for sale. Check it out!

-Rob

Feature Listing: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe Backdate

Among Porsche 911 enthusiasts and collectors the 1973 911 Carrera RS is a much adored car and for very good reason. While not the very first performance oriented model of the 911 Porsche produced, previous versions like the 911R were produced in such small numbers that most buyers never would have had any shot at them. While the Carrera RS was still produced in relatively small numbers, production still reached around 1,500 so there were a few to go around and they caused quite a stir.

Naturally, all of this greatness means prices are now very, very, high. Some Lightweights have eclipsed $1M. Because of those high prices and the general demand for the style and performance it has become increasingly common for builders to backdate later 911s, usually the 3.2 Carrera or (more rarely) the 964, bringing the style of the long-hood Carrera RS to the more modern mechanicals and underlying structure of a later 911. We’ve featured quite a few of these builds and they come in all sorts of spec and with a wide range of prices. Here we have another, which I think looks fantastic in its very understated, but still quite pretty, Dolphin Grey exterior and within the typical range in which we see these priced, this one seems pretty reasonable!

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1987 Porsche 911 Carrera Coupe Backdate at Kachel Motor Co.

Year: 1987
Model: 911 Carrera
Engine: 3.2 liter flat-6
Transmission: 5-speed manual
Mileage: 134,600+ mi
Price: $58,995

KMC is proud to present a unique opportunity to own this bespoke, award-winning, Restomod air-cooled 911. The build was based on a clean, numbers-matching 1987 911 Carrera from California. This was a perfect base for the build, given the well-established reliability of the 3.2L engine, with a slicker-shifting Getrag G50 gear box and revised chain tensioning and lubrication system (which plagued the previous 911 generations). The car has been restored in the style of the venerable 1973 911 RS, with steel long-hood and fenders, and a fiberglass rear-lid with ducktail. All of the chrome trim, door handles and window latches have been re-anodized, which balance out the beautiful, Glasurit Dolphin Grey (an original 356 color) paint. The 17″ pristine replica Fuchs complete the clean and classic look of the car.

The interior has styling cues from the famed Singer 911, including period-correct gauges with a Heuer-logo clock, powder-coated floor-boards and classic-styled, hounds-tooth sport bucket seats. Subtle details like the authentic (and hard to find) Heuer Rally dash timers, Alcantara headliner, dash and door trim, wood 917-style shift knob and made to order Autoflug-style 5-point harness truly make the interior a special and inviting place.

Mechanically, the car is well sorted out with a valve adjustment and clutch service at 134,600 miles. The struts, sway bars and wheel bearings have also been serviced recently, and the car has just been fitted with a brand new set of tires. Tasteful performance upgrades include a Wevo short-shift kit, Steve Wong chip, SSI heat exchangers and Dansk sport mufflers. This car has no cold-start issues, pulls hard and has no oil leaks.

Make no mistake, this is a driver’s car that is as amazing to drive, as it is to behold in your garage or at a car show. If you have ever drooled over Rob Dickinson’s, Lightspeed or Autofarm 911 Restomods, here is your chance to own a one-of-a-kind classic, yet affordable, re-imagined 911.

This particular build began with an ’87 Carrera Coupe, so you’re getting the stout 3.2 liter flat-6 paired with the G50 5-speed transmission. It makes for a nice base and in most cases leads to higher prices though that isn’t much reflected here. The engine sounds like it’s mostly in stock form. There area a few upgrades, but I would expect power levels to be fairly typical for this period Carrera. The exterior is what we expect from such a build: long-hood, ducktail, wider rear, all paired with a nice looking set of Fuchs replicas. The interior looks nicely outfitted as well and in an understated way. They haven’t gone over the top with the details, but things like houndstooth seating and a set of Heuer rally timers are nice additions that provide a sporty feel to the car. Like the RS itself there’s little in the way of extra components to the interior; we have the things we need for piloting the car and little else. In that regard it’s excellent.

And at the end, with an asking price a little below $60K they aren’t asking for something too unreasonable either. Someone interested in replicating such a build will be hardpressed to do so for cheaper without already possessing a well-sorted 3.2 Carrera to use as your base. If you had to buy a car as well it might not be possible. Some may prefer a brighter color (heck, I might prefer a brighter color!), but this isn’t the first 911 I’ve seen painted in one of the lighter shades from the 356 and they tend to look really nice. This one is no different. I wouldn’t say it’s a sleeper, but you can certainly cruise a little freer.

-Rob

Feature Listing: 1991 Audi 200 20V quattro Avant

1991 was a great year for Audi and Volkswagen enthusiasts in America, robust with performance options all around. Fans of normally aspirated motors had multiple double-cam choices; the 16V twins from Volkswagen with the GTI/GLIs, each with heavily bolstered Recaros and awesome BBS wheels. Going slightly less boy racer and more upscale yielded the equally impressive 20V inline-5 duo from Audi, with the Coupe Quattro and 90 20V quattro. They weren’t as quick off the line, but they were certainly well built, solid performing luxury vehicles. Of course, the big daddy of normal aspiration in the lineup was the V8 quattro. Still at 3.6 liters and 240 horsepower for 1991, it was also available with a manual transmission and was in the midst of a winning streak in the DTM series, usurping power from the E30 M3 and 190E 2.5-16 in monumental style.

If forced induction was more your choice for speed, there were plenty of options there, as well. 1991 featured a slightly revised Corrado, now also with BBS wheels and the 1.8 liter G-lader supercharged motor. Audi offered you a luxury cruiser still in the 200 Turbo, as well. But the big news was finally the release of the 20V Turbo motor into the lineup. Long featured in the Sport Quattro, then RR Quattro in Europe and later S2, in America Audi brought the 3B turbocharged inline-5 package in the 200. As an added bonus, it was available in both sedan form and the innovative Avant wagon. Producing 217 horsepower and a bit more torque, the Audi was capable of 0-60 runs in the mid-6 second range if you were quick with your shifts. But this wasn’t a bracket racer – the 200 was a luxury car through and through, with a well-appointed cabin full of the things you’d expect – Zebrano wood trim, electric powered and heated leather seats front and rear, and a high-quality Bose stereo. Unusual for a luxury car of the time, but underscoring the German’s feelings towards driving, were the number of driver-oriented items. The dash was full of gauges, and unlike the V8 and 200 Turbo, the 20V was manual-only. Next to the shift lever was the manual rear differential lock, though as with all the second generation quattro drivetrains, the electronic lock disengaged at 15 m.p.h. automatically. The center differential was a Torsen unit capable of varying power as well. And the brakes were unconventional floating-rotor designs, intended to help haul the heavy 200 down from triple-digit Autobahn speed with ease. Unlike the normal 200, the fenders on the 20V were flared slightly to accommodate BBS forged wheels, 15×7.5″ all around and shared with the V8 quattro. It sounded like a recipe for success, and was a well regarded car when new even if the unconventional manual/turbo-5 setup lacked some grunt compared to the V8s of the day.

Yet this was still the fallout period of both the recession of the 1990s and Audi’s fall from grace in the U.S. market, so the 200 was a slow seller. On top of that, the C3 was at the very end of its life cycle, replaced mid-1991 with the C4 chassis. As a result, very few of the 200 20V quattros were built; Audi claims 4,767 sedans and a scant 1,616 Avants were produced with the 3B motor. Of those, only about 900 sedans made it to America. But the number you care about? Well, this 1991 200 20V quattro Avant is one of the 149 originally imported here.

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Feature Listing: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini World Championship Edition

In 1976, Porsche won the World Sportscar Championship for makes with successful runs in both the 935 and prototype 936 chassis. The 936 was triumphant at Le Mans in the already famous Martini livery, while a series of 935/76s carried the colors in Group 5 FIA sports car racing. It was there that Porsche introduced the ‘slant nose’ aerodynamic bodywork that became the hot mod on 911s in the 1980s; however, in the 1970s you could get a very nice slantnose Porsche – replete with Martini Racing colors – for a lot less than a 911 Turbo.

To commemorate the success of the 1976 season, in 1977 Porsche released a limited run of Martini-colored 924s. Option M426 was the Martini World Championship Edition, and it cost $450. Add in a removable roof like this one for about $350, and the sticker price of this car just passed $10,000. For that sum, Porsche gave you quite a lot of visual enhancement; bathed only in pure white, the 924’s 8-spoke alloy wheels were color-matched to the body. Martini stripes ran the length of the sides, their design mimicking the wedge shape of the 924. Inside, a special two-tone interior of scarlet corduroy and black leatherette was offset with Martini stripes stitched into the upper portion of the seats and blue piping ran throughtout. A commemorative plaque was added to the back of the center console, too, reminding you that the car you were driving was from the house of a champion. You held a real leather steering wheel, and helping execute your commands was achieved by Porsche adding sway bars to the suspension both front and rear. It was a series of small changes that resulted in a neat package, and one that is sought by collectors of the transaxle design today:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1977 Porsche 924 Martini Championship Edition on Hemmings

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Feature Listing: 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo

Given the significant love shown to the 993 in general, and especially the 993 twin-turbo, it might seem strange that I would have to be brought around on them. Yet, that’s exactly the case. Don’t get me wrong, I need no convincing that these are phenomenal machines and their status as the last of the air-cooled 911s brings with them obvious additional layers of allure. But I was a kid in the ’80s so it is the ’80s 911s and the ’80s 930s that really tug at my heart. In the case of the 930, they aren’t sexy cars; they attract by a seeming brute force. In that regard, the 993 almost seemed too pretty. The all-wheel drive and twin-turbocharging features further served to tame the beast. The wildness seemed…not gone, but tamped down.

If I’m honest, when I see a standard 993 these feelings largely remain. They’re very pretty, but my mind still drifts back to the classic 911 or, with increasing regularity, to the 964. The Turbo is different. I’ve been brought around. The wide rear and massive tail pair well with the 993’s curves to produce something that is indeed pretty, but also clearly not to be trifled with. I kind of don’t know what took me so long to figure this out, but I’m glad to present this low-mileage example in the classic colors of black and tan: a Black Metallic 1996 Porsche 911 Turbo with Cashmere leather interior and just 28K miles on it.

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Feature Listing: 2004 Porsche Cayenne Turbo

Did the world need a 450 horsepower Porsche off-roader? Maybe not. Is it cool that one exists? Certainly. Porsche came to the SUV party a little later than Mercedes-Benz, BMW and even corporate partner Volkswagen, but when it did it came in with some serious motivation. Alongside the VR6 and V8 models – already fairly potent engines – came a twin-turbocharged 4.5 liter unit. With 450 horsepower and 460 lb. ft of torque mated to a six-speed Tiptronic transmission, acceleration was blistering. The 5,700lb heavyweight hit 60 in a sports car embarrassing 5.3 seconds and was capable of topping 170 mph. Massive six piston Brembo brakes provided 911-like braking capability, too, and while in default the car had a 60 percent power bias to the rear, Porsche Traction Management system could transfer up to 100 percent of the power to whichever axle needed it most – or, more properly, was using it best.

That hinted that this was more than just a tall on-roader like the X5. No, the Cayenne was a serious off-roader. With lockable center and rear differentials, a low-range box with planetary gearing and height adjustable air suspension, it was more than competent when the going got rough. And with short overhangs both front and rear, it could actually conquer big elements. Pushed, it could also head through nearly 2-foot deep water, as well.

For most Cayenne (and especially Cayenne Turbo models), these features were about as useful for most owners as the top speed of the entire 911 range in the U.S. is. Nevertheless, it pointed towards Porsche’s careful engineering of the Cayenne to be a true all-around performer. And that unique focus on performance has inspired some individuals to capitalize on the model’s prowess:

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2004 Porsche Cayenne Turbo on eBay

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Feature Listing: 1986 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.3-16

Creating the W201 series was a monumental undertaking for Daimler-Benz. Design and prototyping ran through the early days of the 1980s as the company spent 2,000,000,000 DM in development costs for the small chassis to compete against the 3-series. This amount included construction of a new factory in Bremen to help produce the W201. Bruno Sacco, head of Mercedes-Benz styling in the late 1970s and early 1980s, created a compact rendering of the S-class formula which worked well. The chassis brought new refinement to the small executive market, with multi-link independent rear suspension and anti-dive front suspension, along with increased levels of sound deadening and lower wind noise from the aerodynamic design.

Mercedes-Benz wasted little time demonstrating that the new “Baby Benz” was, indeed, worthy of the three-pointed star. The culture within the engineering department was still very much funded with an open checkbook, so no stone was left unturned to created a sedan of unparalleled quality and without compromise. To prove this point, shortly after its introduction Daimler-Benz took three of the newly launched, high-performance 190E 2.3-16 variant to the Nardo test track in Italy. At a time when not many family sedans were able to exceed much more than 110 mph, the diminutive Benz topped 150. But it wasn’t just for a moment; over ten days, the W201s lapped Nardo at a fevered pace, conquering world records in distance over time. First fell the 25,000 km World Record time, then the 25,000 mile one. Ultimately, along with a slew of class records, the 190E 2.3-16s averaged 154 mph for 31,000 miles – yet still returned over 10 mpg.

That achievement signaled the launch of a new level of small sedan performance which soon would be met with improved models from BMW and other marques. And while those subsequent models would go on to be more famous on the race track, the 190E made its mark nonetheless. Following the Nardo record runs, in 1984 Mercedes-Benz handed the keys for 20 identical 2.3-16s to all the Formula 1 stars of the day. The ensuing chaos was enough to make purists cry, but at least one driver who would soon become quite famous took the race seriously. Just like the W201, Senna’s victory at the Nürburgring signaled to the world that there was a new force to be reckoned with; one which quickly would establish itself as a new, higher benchmark.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 1986 Mercedes-Benz 190E 2.3-16 on Washington, D.C. Craigslist

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Feature Listing: 2006 Porsche Cayman S

I sometimes feel I am neglectful of the Porsche Cayman. I write almost exclusively about Porsches and it turns out equally exclusively about the 911. This is by choice, not necessarily by design. The Cayman is (in relative terms) the new kid on the block for Porsche so it doesn’t always possess the sort of historicity that remains rooted in my brain. In simpler terms: these were not the Porsches that captivated me as a kid; not the Porsches that I saw on posters and dreamed about. All of this may be to my loss.

The Cayman is a fantastic car possessing inherently better dynamic balance than its much more well known sibling, the 911. Porsche has been oft criticized for holding the Cayman back, portrayed as fearful that it would overtake their beloved 911, but that doesn’t make the Cayman a family sedan. Impeccable balance, impeccable feel, and still plenty of power for everyday use characterize the chassis. In S specification with a 6-speed manual transmission you’re getting nearly 300 horses propelling a car weighing just over 3,000 pounds. That’s good for 0-60 in around 5 seconds and should you so desire you’ll top out north of 170 mph – not too shabby. There really is a lot to love with these cars and here we have one that comes from the very beginning: an Indischrot 2006 Porsche Cayman S with Sand Beige leather interior and just 31,000 miles on it.

CLICK FOR DETAILS: 2006 Porsche Cayman S at Eurowerkz

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Feature Listing: 2006 BMW 330xi

Although BMW finally equalized the all-wheel drive advantage of its rival Audi as early as the E30, it would take a few generations for the company to offer a truly potent variant of the small four season executive sedan. But when it finally got around to it with the E90, it was a great package. Although the E46 was a hard act to follow, the Bavarians stepped up with an all new 330 model. Now powered by the N52B30 rated at 255 horsepower, it packed even more punch than the outgoing E46. And like its predecessor, the top-of-the-range 330 could be selected with BMW’s constantly variable x-drive all-wheel drive system.

Utilizing a central multi-plate clutch and many computers to monitor vehicle and wheel speed, steering input and throttle/braking, the intelligent all-wheel drive system took the guess work out of poor weather situations. But it was far from the only trick item in the 330’s arsenal. The N52, one of the last developments of the naturally aspirated inline-6 that had been the anchor of the BMW lineup for decades, was a truly special unit. The block was cast from magnesium with an aluminum core. Variable valve timing for both cams meant a guttural screaming at up to 7,000 rpm, yet it was able to return over 30 mpg on the highway. It’s a mind-blowing type of motor that’s just good in every situation and sounds great, too. While the change to the new square dashboard was less driver-oriented, the E90 packed serious computing power beneath its Swiss chalet look; a minimalist design with high quality materials that has stood the test of time well.

Of course, the most desirable of these models were the sport package equipped examples. And, of those, the manual transmission option is the one to get. Welcome, everyone, to just that car:

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